Tag Archives: onion

#3129: Acecook Super Cup Pringles Sour Cream & Onion Yakisoba – Japan

#3129: Acecook Super Cup Pringles Sour Cream & Onion Yakisoba - Japan

Today we have a Zenpop.JP variety – so what’s Zenpop? They’re a subscription service for all things Japanese! Definitely, check them out. By the way, use coupon code RAMENRATER to get $2 off! Here’s what they had to say about this one – ‘To celebrate 50 years in business for the iconic chip brand, and 30 years for Japan’s instant noodle brand Super Cup, they collaborate as Sour Cream & Onion Pringles Yakisoba! A mouthful of soft noodles with the crunch of onion crates a fantastic textural sensation that works to enhance all the punchy flavors.’

I’m really unsure what to expect with this one. It seems kind of gimmicky to say the least, but then again fascinating. Well, only one way to find out!

Acecook Super Cup Pringles Sour Cream & Onion Yakisoba – Japan

#3129: Acecook Super Cup Pringles Sour Cream & Onion Yakisoba - Japan

Detail of side and bottom panels (click to enlarge). Contains pork. To prepare, Add boiling water to line and cover 3 minutes. Drain. Add in sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#3129: Acecook Super Cup Pringles Sour Cream & Onion Yakisoba - Japan

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#3129: Acecook Super Cup Pringles Sour Cream & Onion Yakisoba - Japan

The noodle block.

#3129: Acecook Super Cup Pringles Sour Cream & Onion Yakisoba - Japan

A dry sachet.

#3129: Acecook Super Cup Pringles Sour Cream & Onion Yakisoba - Japan

Lots of light powder.

#3129: Acecook Super Cup Pringles Sour Cream & Onion Yakisoba - Japan

A wet sachet.

#3129: Acecook Super Cup Pringles Sour Cream & Onion Yakisoba - Japan

Oily; smells like sou cream and onion.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion. So… Have you ever wondered what sour cream and onion powder and oil would taste like with yakisoba? Well, here you go. It’s pretty boring, really. A monotony of saltiness and wrongness. It was fun to try, I’ll give it that – but it’s just not something I found palatable. 0.0 out of 5.0 stars.  JAN bar code 4901071207588.

#3129: Acecook Super Cup Pringles Sour Cream & Onion Yakisoba - Japan

Acecook JANJAN yakisoba Kokusosu 104g ~ 12 pieces

Watch me cook up this one on Instant Noodle Recipe Time!

#3038: Wu-Mu Jing Xiang Ban Mian Ramen with Fried Green Onion – Taiwan

#3038: Wu-Mu Jing Xiang Ban Mian Ramen with Fried Green Onion - Taiwan

Thought today would be a good day for some fried green onions! The kind folks at Wu-Mu sent these over a little while back and I thought I’d better review it! Here’s what they have to say about it –

●The wavy noodles reach another level, the middle of them are thick while the both sides of them are thin and curly. The sauce is easily adsorbed on the noodles, creating a better taste!
●The carefully selected soy sauce, 100% brewed and no preservatives.
●The sweetness of the sauce and the fragrance of Scallion blend perfectly in the mouth, create a rich flavor.

Sounds nice – let’s check it out!

Wu-Mu Jing Xiang Ban Mian Ramen with Fried Green Onion – Taiwan

#3038: Wu-Mu Jing Xiang Ban Mian Ramen with Fried Green Onion - Taiwan

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Unsure whether it contains meat – check for yourself. To prepare, add noodles to a pot of boiling water and cook for 3 1/2 minutes. Drain. Add in sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#3038: Wu-Mu Jing Xiang Ban Mian Ramen with Fried Green Onion - Taiwan

The noodle block.

#3038: Wu-Mu Jing Xiang Ban Mian Ramen with Fried Green Onion - Taiwan

A paste sachet.

#3038: Wu-Mu Jing Xiang Ban Mian Ramen with Fried Green Onion - Taiwan

Thick stuff!

Finished (click to enlarge). Added fried onion, scallion, Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts and a soft egg. Noodles have a great chewiness and broad, flat nature. Very good. Flavor is nice, although on the light side for my taste. Not bland, jjust leaves me wanting more. 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 4710175574539.

#3038: Wu-Mu Jing Xiang Ban Mian Ramen with Fried Green Onion - Taiwan

The Food of Taiwan: Recipes from the Beautiful Island

Watch me cook this one on Instant Noodle Recipe Time!

#2836: Shanjinshan Yibin Burning Noodle Green Onion Flavor

#2836: Shanjinshan Yibin Burning Noodle Green Onion Flavor

These came by way of Snackoo – a company that supplies you with great snack boxes, containing all sorts of fascinating things as well as ramen noodles. Why not check them out?

So this is the second Yibin Burning Noodle variety I’ve come across. It sounds interesting every time I come in contact with them, and they usually have interesting packaging like this one. Here’s a little about Yibin from Wikipedia –

Yibin (simplified Chinese宜宾traditional Chinese宜賓Sichuanese Pinyin: nyi2bin1Sichuanese pronunciation[ɲi˨˩pin˥]pinyinYíbīnWade–GilesI-pin) is a prefecture-level city in the southeastern part of Sichuanprovince, People’s Republic of China, located at the junction of the Min and Yangtze Rivers.

Its population was 4,471,840 inhabitants according to the 2010 census of whom 836,340 lived in the built-up (or metro) area made of Cuiping District.

Human habitation of Yibin dates back at least 4,000 years. Yibin was established as a county in the Han dynasty (206 BC − AD 220). Under the Ming and Qing, the town and its hinterland was known as XuzhouCommandery (t 敘州, s 叙州, p Xùzhōufǔ), which was variously romanized as SuifuSuifoo,[citation needed] and Suchow.[2] Its population around 1907 was estimated at 50,000.[3]

There are several hot springs near Yibin, plus many other tourist attractions. Such attractions include the Bamboo Sea in Changning County and the Xingwen Stone Forest. Cuiping mountain in the centre of the city provides wonderful views of Yibin. Yibin is also the confluence of the Min and Jinsha Rivers, which together form the Chang Jiang as the Yangtze River is known in Chinese from Yibin to Shanghai.

Okay then, let’s have a look at this one that was sent by Snackoo!

Shanjinshan Yibin Burning Noodle Green Onion Flavor – China

#2836: Shanjinshan Yibin Burning Noodle Green Onion Flavor

Here’s the bottom of the package (click to enlarge).

#2836: Shanjinshan Yibin Burning Noodle Green Onion Flavor

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add boiling water to fill line in tray with noodles. Cover for (doesn’t say but going to guess at least 4 minutes). Drain using spout. Add in large sachet  contents. Take small sachet and add 200-250ml boiling water in a serving bowl. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2836: Shanjinshan Yibin Burning Noodle Green Onion Flavor

An included fork!

#2836: Shanjinshan Yibin Burning Noodle Green Onion Flavor

A sealed noodle block.

#2836: Shanjinshan Yibin Burning Noodle Green Onion Flavor

A pretty awesome looking sachet.

#2836: Shanjinshan Yibin Burning Noodle Green Onion Flavor

Thick stuff.

#2836: Shanjinshan Yibin Burning Noodle Green Onion Flavor

This is a soup –  you mix it with 200-250ml boiling water.

#2836: Shanjinshan Yibin Burning Noodle Green Onion Flavor

Looks like oil and soy.

#2836: Shanjinshan Yibin Burning Noodle Green Onion Flavor

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo organic mung bean sprouts and spring onion. The noodles are great – nice backbone here and the sauce it goes with has a nice flavor and bit that seem like meat but may be TVP. It does have a happy spring onion skip in its step. As for the burning, the noodle plate isn’t, but the soup is a little bit. Very oily and with a kind of herby taste. 3.75 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 6970657440068.

#2836: Shanjinshan Yibin Burning Noodle Green Onion Flavor

YiBin Burning Noodle (Spicy) 130g

I’m unsure if this is completely related, but it looks tasty

#2591: Myojo Charumera Licca Chan Onion Gratin Soup Noodle

#2591: Myojo Charumera Licca Chan Onion Gratin Soup Noodle - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles ramen

Found these up in Canada at the Osaka market in Yaohan Centre.                            So I’ve seen this on instagram a few times and been wondering what the big deal is. Moreover, what is Licca? Here’s something from Wikipedia –

icca-chan (リカちゃん Rika-chan), full name Licca Kayama (香山リカ Kayama Rika),[1] is a dress-up doll series introduced in Japan on 1967-07-04 by Takara,[1][2] enjoying the same kind of popularity in Japan as the Barbie series does in the United States.[3] The Licca-chan dolls tend toward a more Japanese body as far as height and features. Takara had sold over 48 million Licca-chan dolls as of 2002,[1] and over 53 million as of 2007.[3] Licca-chan was created by former shōjo manga artist, Miyako Maki, who is also the wife of Leiji Matsumoto.

Takara has provided an extensive background story for the Licca-chan doll, including an age (11), where she attends school, names and occupations for her parents, and her favorite books (Anne of Green Gables and A Little Princess). Licca-chan also likes Doraemon.[1]

Rough Trade Records teamed up with Takara in the late 90’s to release “Street Licca”, who was a DJ that carried a Rough Trade record satchel, and mini, doll-sized LPs from the labels’ artists. Along with her Ursula 1000, Gants and Spearmint records, she toted a pair of pink Converse running shoes, grey “leather” pants, headphones, layered hoody and a blond bob haircut. Street Licca was the ultimate “indie rock” doll.

In 2001, a pregnant adult version of Licca-chan was introduced which included a postcard the purchaser could send to Takara for a baby doll. The baby came with a key which allowed the doll to be returned to its standard proportions.[1][4] The release of the doll happened to coincide with the birth of Aiko, the daughter of Crown Prince Naruhito and Crown Princess Masako of Japan, a factor which helped boost the sales of the new doll.[4] Since then, other versions of Licca-chan have been introduced, including a new “Departure Licca”, released just ahead of the 40th anniversary in 2007.[3]

A Licca-chan video game was released for the Nintendo DS in Japan on November 29, 2007.[5] This game was later released in the U.S. on October 14, 2008 as Lovely Lisa.[6]

OK so kind of like a Japanese Barbie doll I suppose. Plus it’s the 50th anniversary of it’s inception. Okay – let’s check out this onion noodle.

Myojo Charumera Licca Chan Onion Gratin Soup Noodle – Japan

#2591: Myojo Charumera Licca Chan Onion Gratin Soup Noodle - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles ramen

The import/distributor sticker (click to enlarge).

#2591: Myojo Charumera Licca Chan Onion Gratin Soup Noodle - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles ramen

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains fish. To prepare, add 290ml boiling water and cover for 3 minutes. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2591: Myojo Charumera Licca Chan Onion Gratin Soup Noodle - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles ramen

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2591: Myojo Charumera Licca Chan Onion Gratin Soup Noodle - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles ramen

The noodle block.

#2591: Myojo Charumera Licca Chan Onion Gratin Soup Noodle - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles ramen

Some loose garnish from the cup.

A fishcake bow. Only found one of these.

Finished (click to enlarge). The noodles actually were quite good – soft and plentiful. The broth is a very rich and onion flavored affair with lots of add-ons including a bow made of fishcake and little bits of meat as well as some vegetable.  Very rich and satisfying. 4.25 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4902881422772.

#2591: Myojo Charumera Licca Chan Onion Gratin Soup Noodle - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles ramen

Myojo L i c c a   c h a n  cup noodles onion gratin soup 66g×12 Japan ramen

Commercials for this character over the years

Meet The Manufacturer: Interview With Kiki Noodle

Interview With Kiki Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - Meet The Manufacturer

Interview With Kiki Noodle * Product Samples From Kiki Noodle (1 of 3) * Product Samples From Kiki Noodle (2 of 3) * Product Samples From Kiki Noodle (3 of 3)Kiki Noodles Sichuan Spices Flavor NoodleKiki Noodles Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle

I got an email from someone at a company I’d never heard of with samples they wanted me to try. I love when this happens; happily,I get to try something new and learn some new things. In this case, a Taiwanese company called Kiki. Without further ado, let’s start things off with this interview with Chester Yeung of Kiki Noodle.

Interview With Kiki Noodle – Taiwan

THE RAMEN RATER> Thank you for agreeing to this interview! To start, can you tell my readers about the history of Kiki Noodle?

KIKI> We have been running our restaurant for 26 years focusing mainly in Sichuan cuisine. Having said that we always put healthy, tasty together with safety as our objectives. We focus very much on noodle – as a main staple food for the Easterners. By using our knowledge and experience in making food, we aim to develop our own type of noodles with the best taste and texture, so as to provide a convenience but yet healthy choice to customers. 2015 marks the birth of pre- packed KiKi noodle, a head start after 26 years of experience accumulation.

TRR> What was the first product you made?

KIKI> Our first pre- packed noodle are Kiki Noodle mixed with Sichuan Spices and Kiki Noodle mixed with Scallion oil & soy sauce

TRR> Your company is located in Taiwan. Can you tell us a little about your country?

KIKI> Taiwan is a beautiful island that dwells 23 million people, with mild climate, our people are friendly and welcoming

TRR> Can you tell us about the varieties of instant noodles you make?

KIKI> We currently producing 2 flavors- Sichuan spices and Scallion oil with soy Sauce. Very soon we will launch new flavor with aged vinegar based sauce mixed noodle with spicy and non- spicy options too

TRR> Why the name Kiki?

KIKI> As we said, the name KiKi is to carry on the brand name of our restaurant

TRR> In what countries are your products available?

KIKI> Apart from Taiwan, currently our product are sold in Hong Kong, China, Korea, Singapore and Australia

TRR> How does your noodle making process differ from other instant noodle manufacturers?

KIKI> Unlike the ordinary deep- fried instant noodle; We adopt the traditional noodle making method – air drying by daylight for 48 hours with absolute zero preservative added. By this mean, the natural flavor of wheat flour is retained in our noodle.

TRR> Are instant noodles the only products you make?

KIKI> We will also launch readymade numb and spicy sauce, seasoning powder and instant Sichuan meal etc.

TRR> A lot of people are concerned with their sodium intake. How would you recommend people enjoy your product as part of a healthy meal?

KIKI> Making Healthy and tasty food is being our main objective, and hence we have spent a lot of time in developing KiKi Noodle, I can tell you that our seasoning has lower sodium content than the other instant noodle. Thanks to the special formula of spices mix that developed in our restaurant

TRR> Are you involved in in your local community or participate in charities?

KIKI> We always actively involved in community activities including donation to those charities that taking care of the Social vulnerable groups.

TRR> Are there any new products coming soon?

KIKI> Definitely, we are quite busy at the moment since we have a packed schedule rolling out our new products including 2 new flavor for KiKi Noodle, instant pack for Sichuan Seasoning, numb & spicy sauce as well as seasoning powder.

TRR> When you make noodles for yourself, what do you like to add to them to make them extra special?

KIKI> I personally would go for a soft boil egg with runny yolk, together with some veggie and slices of meat, if I am staving, I would go for luncheon meat wih sunny side up egg.

THE RAMEN RATER> Thank you very much for this opportunity to learn about Kiki Noodle and your products!

Alright – let’s have a look at their products!

#2423: Ve Wong Kung-Fu Instant Oriental Noodles Soup Artificial Onion Flavor

Another one sent by Colin. I haven’t had any of this brand in quite some time! I should also say I’ve not had an onion flavor instant in quite a while too. Very curious about this one – let’s have a look! NOTE – I just was looking for info on this one and as it turned out, I reviewed it in 2010! It was review #99. I’ll still slap a new number on this one though. What’s funny is if you look at the packaging on it from back then, it says ‘New.’ It still says new! I’m sorry, but this isNOT new.

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add noodle block and sachet contents to a bowl and add 400ml boiling water. Cover for 3-5 minutes. stir and enjoy!

The noodle block.

The dry base sachet.

A powder flecked with herbs.

An oil sachet.

Has an onion scent.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion. The nice and comfortable – pretty good. The broth was a definitely onion flavored one – and it really is strong onion. Kind of like I said in a previous review – this is like Funyuns soup! On this go around over six years later, the package still says new and the flavor seems a bit better. 3.5 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 4710008211686.

Ve Wong Oriental Style Instant Noodle Vegetarian Flavor Soup Base 3 oz

Looks like a drama where one of the characters is enjoying a bowl of instant noodles from Ve Wong.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Here’s one I’ve liked for a while . In fact, it’s on the Taiwanese op Ten list! I really like shrimp as well as onion! I thought since I’ve had the opportunity to try a nice amount of Taiwanese food now, I’d share this info about their food from wikipedia:

Pork, seafood, chicken, rice, and soy are very common ingredients. Beef is far less common, and some Taiwanese (particularly the elderly generation) still refrain from eating it.[1] This is in part due to the considerations of some Taiwanese Buddhists, a traditional reluctance towards slaughtering precious cattle needed for agriculture, and an emotional attachment and feeling of gratitude and thanks to the animals traditionally used for very hard labour.[1] However, due to influences from the influx of out of province Chinese in the early 1900s, the Taiwanese version of beef noodle soup is now one of the most popular dishes in Taiwan.

Taiwan’s cuisine has also been influenced by its geographic location. Living on a crowded island, the Taiwanese had to look aside from the farmlands for sources of protein. As a result, seafood figures prominently in their cuisine. This seafood encompasses many different things, from large fish such as tuna and grouper, to sardines and even smaller fish such as anchovies. Crustaceans, squid, and cuttlefish are also eaten.
A pork keⁿ, a thick soup with tofu and surimi-coated pork
Because of the island’s sub-tropical location, Taiwan has an abundant supply of various fruit, such as papayas, starfruit, melons, and citrus fruit. A wide variety of tropical fruits, imported and native, are also enjoyed in Taiwan. Other agricultural products in general are rice, corn, tea, pork, poultry, beef, fish, and other fruits and vegetables. Fresh ingredients in Taiwan are readily available from markets.

In many of their dishes, the Taiwanese have shown their creativity in their selection of spices. Taiwanese cuisine relies on an abundant array of seasonings for flavour: soy sauce, rice wine, sesame oil, fermented black beans, pickled radish, pickled mustard greens, peanuts, chili peppers, cilantro (sometimes called Chinese parsley), and a local variety of basil (九層塔; káu-chàn-tha̍h; “nine story pagoda”).

An important part of Taiwanese cuisine are xiaochi,[2] substantial snacks along the lines of Spanish tapas or Levantine meze.

The Taiwanese xiaochi has gained much reputation internationally. Many travelers go to Taiwan just for xiǎochī. The most common place to enjoy xiǎochī in Taiwan is in a night market. Each night market also has its own famous xiǎochī.

Moreover, the Taiwanese xiǎochī has been improving to a higher level. Nowadays, Taiwanese xiǎochī not only served in night markets but some luxury and high-end restaurants. The prices usually jump 100% or even higher in the restaurants. Also, the Taiwanese government supports the Taiwanese xiǎochī and has held national xiǎochī events in Taiwan regularly.

Let’s give this one a try.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor – Taiwan

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains shrimp. To prepare, boil a pot of water. Add in noodle block and cook for 5 1/2 minutes. Drain. Finally, add in sachet contents. Stir and enjoy!

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

The package contains 4 servings like this.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

The noodle block.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

A dry sachet.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Looks like shrimp and chives perhaps?

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

A liquid sachet.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Dark – maybe soy sauce.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

A second liquid sachet.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

The onion oil.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spiralized carrot, sliced spring onion and a shrimp. Good gauge and chew once again to these fine noodles. The flavor is amazing! I gave it 5 stars last time but I feel like I should give it 6 although that isn’t possible! The taste is a great shrimp and onion fusion – sweet and absolutely delicious. Okay, I’m saying it. yummy. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 4717011150018.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Find Mom’s Dry Noodle Products at Rakuten

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp among other varieties being featured on a popular Taiwanese TV show.

#2106: Itomen Onion Flavor Shoyu Ramen

Here’s an interesting one from Colin – thanks again! This is an onion flavored shoyu. I’ve had a few onion flavor varieties – let’s give this one from Itomen a try!

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Unsure whether it has meat or not. To prepare, add noodle block and clear sachet to 500ml boiling water and cook 3 minutes. Add in soup base. Stir and enjoy!

The noodle block.

The soup base sachet.

A light tan powder.

A sachet of onions.

A decent quantity.

Finished (click to enlarge). Adde Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, spring onion, chashu pork and hard boiled egg. The noodles were excellent – imagine if you had 2 standard instant noodles that were next to eachother. It’s like that; like a double-wide instant noodle and it works quite well. The broth was good – definitely shoyu, however not getting a huge amount of ‘onionniness’ from it. The onions did hydrate well, but they could definitely have been bigger and in the same quantity – would’ve worked better. 3.5 out of 5.0 stars.  JAN bar code 4901104132269.

Source yakisoba 5 meals pack of Itomen Good

An Itomen TV commercial.

#2070: Tokushima Seifun Negi Ramen

Here’s the last of the Tokushim Seifun varieties sent to me by Wesley, a reader from Japan at school in Canada – thanks again! This last one is negi – green onion! Let’s check it out!

Detail of the side and bottom of the bowl (click to enlarge). Unsure whether it contains meat. To prepare add in contents of onion sachet and boiling water to fill line. Cover for 3 minutes. Add in contents of liquid sachet. Stir and enjoy!

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

The noodle block.

The soup base sachet.

Looks oily and has a sweet soy scent.

The onion sachet.

A lot of spring onion!

Finished (click to enlarge). Added hard boiled egg, Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts and chashu pork. The noodles ended up a little on the spongy side which was a disappointment. They were thick which was nice, but just didn’t have the smoothness I’m accustomed to. The broth has a nice soy taste which went well with the supplied negi which was plentiful as well as little pieces of pork in squares. However, the pork didn’t hydrate altogether that well which was a downside. 1.75 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4904760010421.

Mino octopus arabesque ramen bowl + large spoon

A Tokushima Seifun TV commercial.

The Ramen Rater Reviews The Red Robin ‘Red Ramen Burger’

We were out doing grocery shopping and thought ‘hey there’s that Red Robin over there – wonder if they have those Red Ramen Burgers.’ Well, after a quick phone call to make sure they did, we swooped in to give them a try.

On the door (click to enlarge) we immediately saw some advertising for it. Kind of funny; the cat is clutching a bottle of ‘That’s Not Your Father’s Ginger Ale’ (I tried the root beer version which gave me a horrible gut ache) and nowhere did I see any mention of ordering this product anywhere.

At the table.

So it’s $12.49 – a little on the high end.

However if it were one of our birthdays, we could have gotten one for free!

Ready.

Ready.

Miles decided to sleep through the whole thing – he was out seconds after this.

Here is the one I got (click to enlarge).

A side shot of the burger (click to enlarge).

Let the investigation begin…

Well, there were some problems with this burger I found from the outset. They didn’t fry the bun long enough as it completely fell apart rather quickly. After about 3 bites, I ended up using a fork and eating it off the little plastic tray. The ‘seasoned bun’ really didn’t seem altogether seasoned at all to me; in fact, it just seemed bland. The burger itself was alright, but the aioli of onion, carrot and cabbage was like coleslaw and was just not right. Neither of us detected the presence of any basil really. Honestly, I wouldn’t bother with this overpriced burger. If I were to make a suggestion, do it like they did originally in Japan – use chashu pork! Maybe some tonkatsu sauce! In fact, I know that a short walk away from the Red Robin we visited in Katsu Burger, and last time we were there they had mentioned offering a ramen burger soon using breaded pork and tonkatsu sauce with a ramen bun.

Kit’s ramen burger (click to enlarge) was a little different. As you can see, the bun definitely seems a little darker.

Here’s a side shot. Hers stayed cohesive and I could definitely hear a lot more crunch to it when she took a bite. She had the same complaints about the aioli as well; she thought it was teriyaki sauce on coleslaw. They offered to serve it with or without jalapenos at the beginning which we both declined at the start. Jalapenos would have definitely overwhelmed all the flavor of the teriyaki, that’s for sure. I think we both agreed – the Red Ramen Burger gets about a 2 out of 5 stars – not extremely fun at all. A better idea is to make your own! Here’s the recipe I came up with using Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black South Korean instant noodles – in fact, you use everything from it and come out with fries and dipping sauce as well! Check it out!

The Ramen Rater’s Shin Ramyun Black Burger

  • 1 Package Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black
  • ground beef
  • 1 egg
  • 2 slices processed cheese
  • frozen french fries
  • cooking spray
  • ketchup and mayonnaise

The noodle block. This is where our buns come from.

In this recipe, everything in the package is used. I’ve seen so many recipes for ramen burgers where the flavorings are discarded. Why waste?

Step 1: Boil a pot of water. Add the noodle block and cook for 4 minutes. Drain well. Return to pot and crack egg into it – combine with noodles. Split noodle/egg mixture into two bowls. I used one with a rounded bottom for the bun and one with a flat bottom for the lower bun (actually, the top part of a bun is called the ‘crown’ and the bottom the ‘heel!) Press the noodles down a little and then put in the fridge for a couple hours to set.

Here are the crown and heel all done and out of their bowls.

Step 2: Spray pan and cook both sides of your buns until done as you like. A nice crispness is really enjoyable, but burnt isn’t so great so just keep and eye on them and don’t flip too much – they are a little delicate.

Step 3: For the fries – use a little cooking spray on them and sprinkle liberally with the gold Sul-Long-Tang powder packet and cook.

Step 4: Empty the contents of the green package into a little bowl and add some hot water. Let sit for a minute or so which lets the veggies and other bits hydrate. Drain.

Step 5: Add ketchup and mayonnaise – I used a little more mayo than ketchup – and combin3. This will be the fry sauce as well as the sauce for the burger.

Step 6: For the patty, add the entire red packet to the ground beef and combine well. Form into a patty and cook. Put the buns and burger together – add processed cheese and sauce.

Voila! Click image to enlarge). This came out really nice – the burger has a really great flavor from the red packet. I think you could switch it as well – use the red packet on the fried and the gold packet with the beef. Either way, this was really good – I hope you try it and let me know how it goes!

 

#1648: Wei Lih Instant Noodles With Onion Flavour

This is one I got last month on my birthday trip to Canada! What’s interesting is that it’s one I tried to get along with a couple others from one store up there the previous year but there was some kind of thing that to use a card you’d need to spend at least $20 or something, and since the noodles I found were a far cry from that, I skipped it. I really was bummed – this is nowhere to be found here in the USA so thought this time around I’d see if the place had it – and it did! Let’s check out this Wei Lih onion variety.

 Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add noodles and sachet contents to a bowl. Add 350ml boiling water and cover for 3 minutes. Stir and enjoy! Alternately, you can cook on a stove with 500ml boiling water with the same method.

The noodle block.

The dry seasoning sachet.

Has a kind of sweet scent.

The paste sachet.

Has a very strong onion scent.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added white onion and beef I sauteed. The noodles came out very well – good texture and chew. They sucked up just the right amount of broth as they steeped. The broth is just great stuff. If you like strong onion flavor, this is what you’ll be wanting. It has a nice oiliness to it and a really strong onion taste. 4.25 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 4710199080740.

Here you can try the more popular variety – WEI-LIH Noodle, JA JAN Flavor,3OZ

A Wei Lih Jah Jan Mien TV commercial.

#1640: Long Jun Hang Tainan Yi Mien With Onion Oil Sauce

These tend to be a little hard to figure out; what flavor? What brand? Luckily, I had help from Bobby Y. on the first of these I found, and knowing some of the standard flavors of Taiwanese instants, the translation I got of a page that came up from the bar code on Google was logical. Anyways, Let’s try this onion oil flavor Taiwanese noodle offering.

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, boil a pot of water and cook noodles for 3 minutes. Drain. Add in contents of liquid sachet and stir. Enjoy!

The noodle block.

The onion oil sauce sachet.

Has a kind of onion soy scent.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added spring onion. The noodles are rather chewy and almost a little rubbery. The flavor was light and kind of off-putting in after taste. Nonetheless, it did flavor all the noodles and wasn’t bland. 2.0 out of 5.0 stars.EAN bar code 4719863230658.

TAINAN DRIED NOODLES – GREEN ONION 2x600G

This lady is really happy to be in Taiwan!