Tag Archives: fried

#3216: Sapporo Ichiban Small Fried Shrimp Soba – Japan

#3216: Sapporo Ichiban Small Fried Shrimp Soba - Japan

Today, we have one that was part of Japan Crate’s Umai Crate. So Japan Crate is a subscription service which has all sorts of different options for you. pretty neat stuff from Japan! There’s a coupon code for you too – just use THERAMENRATER to get a special discount at check out.

So here’s what the folks at Japan Crate had to say about this variety -“Savor a bowl of soba this winter with bits of dried shrimp! Hot soba like this one is usually served as a noodle soup in a bowl of hot tsuyu (dashi soup stock and a mixture of soy sauce, mirin and sugar) as a sou p base. It’s a thinner version than the dipping sauce used for cold soba. For a busy day, take this one to go for a quick lunch at work.”

Alright, let’s go!

Sapporo Ichiban Small Fried Shrimp Soba – Japan

#3216: Sapporo Ichiban Small Fried Shrimp Soba - Japan

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains shrimp. To prepare, fill to line with boiling water and cover for 3 minutes. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#3216: Sapporo Ichiban Small Fried Shrimp Soba - Japan

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#3216: Sapporo Ichiban Small Fried Shrimp Soba - Japan

The noodle block.

#3216: Sapporo Ichiban Small Fried Shrimp Soba - Japan

Loose seasoning from the cup.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added 31-44ct shrimp, spring onion, and tempura. The noodles are very thin and hydrated well. Not soggy. The flavor is a salty shrimp tasty – pretty strong too. Not bad – especially with included kamaboko and tempura, however included shrimp was full of shell. 2.5 out of 5.0 stars.  JAN bar code 4901734035961.

#3216: Sapporo Ichiban Small Fried Shrimp Soba - Japan

Sapporo Yakisoba Chow Mein Noodles, 3.60 Ounce (Pack of 24)

Watch me cook on Instant Noodle Recipe Time!

#2874: Samyang Foods Buldak Bokkeummyun Hot Chicken Flavor Almonds

#2874: Samyang Foods Buldak Bokkeummyun Hot Chicken Flavor Almonds

I’ll be first to say that I enjoy almonds, usually the smokehouse ones. You know the ones I’m talking about. I’m pretty partial to chocolate ones too although I don’t usually have them. I’ve had ones with crunchy candy coating too. I also tasted almond milk the other day – tasty but just seemed so weird – but I liked it.

These on the other hand are a chicken of a different color as it were. Let’s take a look and see how they are.

Samyang Foods Buldak Bokkeummyun Hot Chicken Flavor Almonds – South Korea

#2874: Samyang Foods Buldak Bokkeummyun Hot Chicken Flavor Almonds

Here’s the back of one of the individual packages (click to enlarge). They come in a display box also. No meat here. To prepare, open package, insert pair of grabby fingers. Grasp one or more almonds. Insert into primary face hole. Finally, masticate andf enjoy!

#2874: Samyang Foods Buldak Bokkeummyun Hot Chicken Flavor Almonds

A single almond.

#2874: Samyang Foods Buldak Bokkeummyun Hot Chicken Flavor Almonds

Finished (click to enlarge). The almonds are smooth and shiny from the thin crunchy coating. They are indeed hot – very hot. I really expected a heat level more along the lines of the Zzaldduck snack but these are rip-roaring feisty spicy. The almonds are of good quality and the flavor is undoubtedly Buldak Bokkeummyun original. For a snack, I give these 4.0 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 8801073910157.

#2874: Samyang Foods Buldak Bokkeummyun Hot Chicken Flavor Almonds

Samyang Buldak Spicy Chicken Squid 40g X 5 Pack Buldak Almond 3 Pack (Buldak Combo Set ( Squid 5Pack + Almond 3Pack))

California probably makes the most almonds anywhere I’m guessing. This looks to be a promo video for use in South Korea.

#2568: Nongshim Mr. Bibim Stir Fried Kimchi Flavour

#2568: Nongshim Mr. Bibim Stir Fried Kimchi Flavour - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - ramyun

So I have a new contact named Danny at Nongshim Korea – one of the guys from Happy Souper helped me get a hold of him via email – thanks! Danny was kind enough to send along these new Mr. Bibim varieties. They’re dry noodles with a liquid base and kimchi included. Here’s a little about kimchi from wikipedia –

The origin of kimchi dates back at least to the early period of the Three Kingdoms (37 BCE‒7 CE).[19] Fermented foods were widely available, as the Records of the Three Kingdoms, a Chinese historical text published in 289 AD, mentions that “The Goguryeo people [referring to the Korean people] are skilled in making fermented foods such as wine, soybean paste and salted and fermented fish” in the section named Dongyi in the Book of Wei.[20][21] Samguk Sagi, a historical record of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, also mentions the pickle jar used to ferment vegetables, which indicates that fermented vegetables were commonly eaten during this time.[20][22]

A poem on Korean radish written by Yi Gyubo, a 13th century literatus, shows that radish kimchi was a commonplace in Goryeo (918–1392).[4][23][24]

Pickled radish slices make a good summer side-dish,
Radish preserved in salt is a winter side-dish from start to end.
The roots in the earth grow plumper everyday,
Harvesting after the frost, a slice cut by a knife tastes like a pear.

— Yi Gyubo, Dongguk isanggukjip (translated by Michael J. Pettid, in Korean cuisine: An Illustrated History)

However, early records of kimchi do not mention garlic or chili peppers.[25] Kimchi was not red until the late 16th century, when chili peppers were introduced to Korea by Portuguese traders based in NagasakiJapan.[25][26][27] The first mention of chili pepper is found in Jibong yuseol, an encyclopedia published in 1614.[20][28] Sallim gyeongje, a 17‒18th century book on farm management, wrote on kimchi with chili peppers.[20][29] However, it was not until the 19th century that the use of chili peppers in kimchi was widespread.[30] The recipes from early 19th century closely resemble today’s kimchi.[31][32]

A 1766 book, Jeungbo sallim gyeongje, reports kimchi varieties made with myriad of ingredients, including chonggak-kimchi (kimchi made with chonggak raddish), oi-sobagi (with cucumber), seokbak-ji (with jogi-jeot), and dongchimi.[20][33] However, napa cabbage was only introduced to Korea at the end of 19th century,[30] and whole-cabbage kimchi similar to its current form is described in Siuijeonseo, a cookbook published around that time.[34]

Kimchi is a national dish of both North and South Korea. During South Korea’s involvement in the Vietnam War its government requested American help to ensure that South Korean troops, reportedly “desperate” for the food, could obtain it in the field;[35] South Korean president Park Chung-hee told U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson that kimchi was “vitally important to the morale of Korean troops”. It was also sent to space on board Soyuz TMA-12 with South-Korean astronaut Yi So-yeon after a multimillion-dollar research effort to kill the bacteria and lessen the odor without affecting taste.[35]

Mr. Bibim seems to be a kind of play on the popular bibimbap dish. If I’m correct, bibim means ‘mixed’ but I could be wrong. Let’s go ahead and learn a little about Mr. Bibim!

Nongshim Mr. Bibim Stir Fried Kimchi Flavour – South Korea

#2568: Nongshim Mr. Bibim Stir Fried Kimchi Flavour - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - ramyun

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains fish. To prepare, add noodle block and vegetables sachet  to 500ml boiling water and cook for 2.5 minutes. Drain noodles. Add in liquid base. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2568: Nongshim Mr. Bibim Stir Fried Kimchi Flavour - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - ramyun

The noodle block.

#2568: Nongshim Mr. Bibim Stir Fried Kimchi Flavour - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - ramyun

The liquid base sachet.

#2568: Nongshim Mr. Bibim Stir Fried Kimchi Flavour - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - ramyun

Has a kimchi scent.

#2568: Nongshim Mr. Bibim Stir Fried Kimchi Flavour - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - ramyun

The vegetables sachet.

#2568: Nongshim Mr. Bibim Stir Fried Kimchi Flavour - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - ramyun

Kimchi!

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion and Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts. The noodles came up just a hint al dente – probably due to the shorter cook time. This however worked quite well. The saucer coated all surfaces very well. It was indeed a kimchi flavored affair with a wallop of heat not for the faint of heart. The included kimchi was of good quality and quite nice. 4.25 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 031146038930.

#2568: Nongshim Mr. Bibim Stir Fried Kimchi Flavour - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - ramyun

Nongshim Noodle Soup, Kimchi, 4.2 Ounce (Pack of 10)

A great way to prepare instant ramyun noodles from South Korea

Re-Review: Paldo Bulnak Bokkeummyun Pan Stirfried Noodle

Re-Review: Paldo Bulnak Bokkeummyun Pan Stirfried Noodle - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - octopus - spiciest

Okay, okay. After being bombarded with people disagreeing with the odrer of the ranking on my The Ramen Rater’s Top Ten Spiciest Instant Noodles list, I thought I’d give this one another go-round.

The little octopus on the pack seems to be beckoning me to try again – I’ve seen him alkmost every trip to a Korean grocery, although it’s pretty hard for me to do re-reviews. Why? Well, I’ve already tried it. I’ve got so many that I need to try here… But lately that number has been dwindling so just seemed like a good time and especially a good time since I’m preparing for the 2017 edition of the spicy list.

I think I’ll do a mukbang video for this one. That’s when you scarf it down really fast in front of all to see. Kind of weird but why not – that’ll be at the bottom. Okay – let’s check out this Bulnak variety!

Paldo Bulnak Bokkeummyun Pan Stirfried Noodle – South Korea

Re-Review: Paldo Bulnak Bokkeummyun Pan Stirfried Noodle - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - octopus - spiciest

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains octopus. To prepare, add noodles and vegetables sachet to 500ml boiling water and cook for 3 minutes, 30 seconds. Drain. Add in liquid base sachet and cook for 30 seconds. Finally, stir and enjoy!

Re-Review: Paldo Bulnak Bokkeummyun Pan Stirfried Noodle - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - octopus - spiciest

The noodle block.

Re-Review: Paldo Bulnak Bokkeummyun Pan Stirfried Noodle - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - octopus - spiciest

The liquid base sachet.

Re-Review: Paldo Bulnak Bokkeummyun Pan Stirfried Noodle - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - octopus - spiciest

Thick with a spicy scent.

Re-Review: Paldo Bulnak Bokkeummyun Pan Stirfried Noodle - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - octopus - spiciest

The vegetables sachet.

Re-Review: Paldo Bulnak Bokkeummyun Pan Stirfried Noodle - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - octopus - spiciest

Lots of green onion.

Finished (click to enlarge). The noodles hydrate just right. An excellent gauge and chew as well. The liquid base coats everything thoroughly – no skimping here. The flavor is an extremely fiery one. It’s a little sweet and then has a nice seafood kind of taste as well. The included garnish works just right. Definitely not for the innocent bystander spicy fan – only for the hardcore. 4.0 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 648436101030.

Re-Review: Paldo Bulnak Bokkeummyun Pan Stirfried Noodle - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - octopus - spiciest

Paldo Octopus Pan Noodle Irresistable Sweet Spicy Ramen (Pack of 4)

Watch me do an on camera critique

#2302: Nissin Yakisoba Instant Noodles

#2302: Nissin Yakisoba - Japan - The Ramen Rater

It’s kind of interesting. Indeed, I review two products a day but generally only post one. This ensures two things. First, I get to everything before it expires. Second, I have a buffer in case I don’t have time to do a review. Meanwhile, the buffer has grown and is quickly reaching 80 reviews! I did this review on November 13th, 2016 and today is Inauguration Day, January 20th, 2017. It’s kind of funny; I did this review about as many days before my daughter Miriam was born as days since she was born (December 17th). Another interesting thing is while unplanned, this review follows Momofuku Ando Day yesterday where I did a video about Nissin Yakisoba. Weird. Finally Happy Birthday to my sister Sue!

I reviewed this Nissin Yakisoba so many years ago that I think it deserves a new number today. Why? Well, back then it had a mayonnaise and mustard pack which is not present here; kind of a bummer since it went so well. But hey – I have a feeling this will be good. I thought I’d review this one today as my wife Kit really likes yakisoba and I’m about to go on a big trip to Taiwan tonight. Going to be gone for five days. This will be the longest I’ve been away from my son Miles since he was born – going to miss them both so much! I should mention that this review will be coming out long after I’ve returned – its November 13th right now and I wouldn’t be surprised if this doesn’t come out until around New Year’s Eve. Anyways, what’s yakisoba? Let’s ask wikipedia –

Yakisoba (焼きそば?), literally “fried buckwheat,” or sōsu yakisoba (ソース焼きそば?) (the same, but in sauce), is considered a Japanese dish but may have originated in Japan as a variant of fried noodles. It first appeared in food stalls in Japan during the early 20th century.[1] Although soba means buckwheat, typically suggesting noodles made from that flour in mainland Japan, yakisoba noodles are made from wheat flour. It is typically flavored with a condiment similar to oyster sauce. Prepared by frying ramen-style noodles with bite-sized pork, vegetables (usually cabbage, onions or carrots) and flavored with yakisoba sauce, salt and pepper. It is served with a multitude of garnishes, such as aonori(seaweed powder), beni shoga (shredded pickled ginger), katsuobushi (fish flakes), and mayonnaise.

Let’s check it out!

#2302: Nissin Yakisoba – Japan

#2302: Nissin Yakisoba - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Detail from the bottom and sides of the cellophane outer wraps (click to enlarge).

#2302: Nissin Yakisoba - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge). Probably contains fish. To prepare, open tab 1 to line 2 and take out sachets. Add boiling water to line and close for 3 minutes. Next, remove tab 3 to expose drain spout and drain. Finally, add in contents of sachets. Stir and enjoy!

#2302: Nissin Yakisoba - Japan - The Ramen Rater

The noodle block.

#2302: Nissin Yakisoba - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Bits from under the noodle block – primarily cabbage.

#2302: Nissin Yakisoba - Japan - The Ramen Rater

A dry base sachet.

#2302: Nissin Yakisoba - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Smells like yakisoba sauce!

#2302: Nissin Yakisoba - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Another dry sachet.

#2302: Nissin Yakisoba - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Looks like shichimi togarashi.

#2302: Nissin Yakisoba - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Finished (click to enlarge). Added beef and mayonnaise (put mayonnaise in a sandwich bag in one end then poke holes with a toothpick in one side on the other end and squirt) and beef. The noodles came out well – a little thinner than expected. Indeed, the quantity is serious here – only for those with a serious appetite! The yakisoba flavor is a little lighter than expected but it’s very good – not overdone. The cabbage is nice and crunchy and the sprinkle of togarashi is a plus. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4902105226780.

#2302: Nissin Yakisoba - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Nisshin source yakisoba cup mustard mayonnaise 108g ~ 12 pieces

A video from the Sixth Annual Momofuku Ando Day of me preparing Nissin Yakisoba.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2122: Nissin Chilli Noodles Stir Fried Holy Basil Flavour

This one sounds particularly interesting – from the picture, it looks like a seafood fried noodle. However, holy basil sounds alluring – let’s check this unique variety out!

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Unsure if it contains meat. To prepare, add noodle block to 300ml boiling water and let steep for 3 minutes covered. drain water and add in seasoning sachet contents. stir and enjoy!

The noodle block.

The dry seasoning base.

A light powder.

An oil sachet.

A light oil.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added coriander and chopped garlic on top. The noodles are great this way – nice gauge and chew and their brilliant color shines when unencumbered by a broth. The flavor in this one is truly unique; a strong taste of basil to start with and then a hit of spiciness. It’s really quite good! 4.75 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 8852528002811.

Nissin Chilli Instant Noodles Stir Fried Holy Basil Flavour…

A Nissin Chilli Noodles TV commercial.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2083: Nissin Taisho Fried Noodle Sesame Paste Flavour Instant Noodle

Last night, we went to a little Taiwanese restaurant nearby and I brought home some leftovers. I got some Hakka style fried tofu, squid and pork belly with vegetables; not covered in sauce but nicely seasoned. I immediately though ‘what noodles night this go well with for Meet The Manufacturer?’ This one sounds like a good bet! Let’s check it out!

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains pork, oyster and chicken. To prepare, add noodle to 500ml boiling water and cook for 3 minutes. Drain. Add in contents of sachet. Stir and enjoy!

The noodle block.

The liquid seasoning sauce sachet.

Has a rich sesame scent.

 2016_5_24_2083_007a

Finished (click to enlarge). Added leftover from last nights dinner – fried tofu, pork belly and squid with vegetables from a Taiwanese restaurant called Looking For Chai. The noodles came out very well – great gauge and chew to them. They were perfect for the sesame paste flavor – which wasn’t too strong or too weak and coated nicely. This was really good! 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 4897878610044.

Nissin Demae Ramen Variety Pack (6 Flavors)

A Nissin HK TV commercial for their Cup Noodles.

MyOri Creates New Packaging – Endorsed By The Ramen Rater

Got this package in the mail yesterday – let’s look inside!

MyOri’s new packaging (click to enlarge) – looks really snazzy!

But wait a second (click to enlarge) – it’s me on the package! I have accepted an offer to be the brand ambassador for MyOri’s products! It’s an honor and really exciting to be able to represent these – I’ve reviewed them in the past and they did really well. The green gurry vermicelli was #1 on the rice noodle top ten list – really good stuff!

Here’s their other product (click to enlarge), their Red Curry. This used to be called white curry, but they wanted to be differentiated from other white curries insofar as having their noodles being the only ones that are non-fried in that flavor profile. So, I’ll be reviewing both of these soon! Not only that, these will be available in the United States really soon! When I find out where ytou can get them, I’ll let you know. Thanks to Leslie at MyOri USA for sending these as well as everyone at MyOri in Malaysia!

#1730: Wu-Mu BBQ Pork Flavor Chow Mein

Here’s yet another I got up in Canada during my birthday trip this last year. This one sounded especially good – chow mein! BBQ pork! How can you go wrong? Well, my hope is that one can’t go wrong! Let’s find out.

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, boil the noodle block for 4 minutes and drain. Add in sachet contents and stir. Enjoy!

The non fried noodle block.

A liquid sachet.

Has a nice BBQ pork scent.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added barbecue pork, mung bean sprouts and white onion. The noodles had a strong chew to them and were plentiful. The flavor was very much like barbecue pork you would get when you get the Chinese appetizer at an American restaurant; sweet and tasty. It worked very well. 4.5 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 4710175570722.

DRY NOODLE-THIN 1x4LB

Egad – okay so here’s a Wu Mu TV advert shrouded in a T&T commercial. For those of you who don’t know about my dealings with T&T, check this out.

Meet The Manufacturer: #1028: Samyang Foods Buldalk Bokkeummyeon (Hot Fried Chicken Ramyun)

Well this one looks to be extremely spicy. Samyang Foods sent some instructions along as everything on the back of these packages are in Korean. Well, they also added a little advice:

If it is too spicy for you to finish, you’d better add a soft-fried egg, vegetables or some chicken 🙂 My fingers are crossed for you!

Wow – I think I’ve got my work cut out for me on this one! Spicy chicken stir noodles… Let’s do it!

The back of the package (click to enlarge). Notice the little grumpy chicken talking about SHU. SHU are Scoville Heat Units, a way to rate the degree of spiciness. The scornful fowl is warning us about this being 4,404 SHU. I’ve found a variety in the past that has 5,930 SHU – that was really hot! Curious how I’ll do with this one…

The noodle block.

The liquid packet.

Oh dude. It kind of looks like fire with smoke coming up from it, doesn’t it? Gave a taste with a toothpick – it’s tasty and then super hot! Being a stir noodle, this will be undiluted by water.

A black and white packet. Hot pepper flake, perhaps?

Looks like some seaweed and sesame seeds.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added baked chicken seasoned with adobo and Cavender’s Greek seasoning, sweet onion, fried egg and green onions. As I always do in my reviews, I sampled the product before adding all my own garnishes. The noodles are thick and chewy. The flavoring is pretty good – extreme spiciness! Has a nice kind of fried chicken taste. The sesame and seaweed ass a nice little finish. If you don’t like spicy foods, stay away! If you do, this will satisfy! Eyes watering and nose running! 4.0 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 8801073110502.

A Samyang commercial.

Pardoning The Turkey Until Tomorrow: The Ramen Rater’s Thanksgiving Breakfast Feast

I am in charge of throwing the turkey in the oven this year at noon. I figured breakfast shouldn’t have anything turkey like involved and pardon the turkey at least ramen-wise for a day. Then Black Friday will be a day that the turkeys will cower – planning on using turkey in some ramen meals for the next week or so – should be awesome! But for now, here’s something I decided to make for breakfast. By the way, here’s what I did for 2011’s Thanksgiving.

Everything But Turkey Thanksgiving Breakfast

Ingredients

  • 1 Nongshim Bowl Noodle Soup Savory Beef (or any other noodles, although these were easy in the microwave)
  • 2 eggs, scrambled
  • ham
  • minced garlic
  • 2 slices processed cheese
  • minced garlic
  • Dua Belibis chili sauce (Sriracha or any other spicy sauce – omit if you don’t like)
  • 1 tbsp oil

Method

  1. Put a pan on the stove and add oil. Heat.
  2. Break your eggs into a little bowl and scramble. Take the ham you have and cut it up.
  3. Cook the Bowl Noodle in the microwave. Usually you cook for three minutes then let it sit for one – don’t! After the three minutes, take it out, stir well and drain very well.
  4. Drop noodles in the pan and fry it up. Stir and stir so it doesn’t stick. Add garlic.
  5. Once the noodles are becoming crisp, add ham and stir in, then add eggs and combine.
  6. Cover and lower heat. Cook for a couple minutes.
  7. At this point, the bottom will be nice and crisp. Flip the whole thing into a bowl. Garnish with cheese and Dua Belibis.

Here’s what you end up with. Note that there’s beef flavored noodles, chicken eggs and pork ham. Even some cheese made from cow’s milk. Everything in there’s not turkey! It came out really good – dig in and Happy Thanksgiving!

Some Thanksgiving FAILS!

A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving

Finally, here’s 15 minutes of last yewar’s insanest Black Friday footage. Is acting liker a complete moron really workth a product that costs pennies for a company to make? Home electronics aren’t a great trade for injuries and silliness such as this…  I mean it’s just stuff…

Speaking of stuff… Here’s George Carlin’s take on it.

Re-Review: Wei Lih Jah Jan Mien Instant Noodles With Fried Soybeans Paste

Went to the 99 Ranch Market near us a few weeks ago and my son Andy picked this as something he would like to try. Well, today is the day to try it out! The first time I tried this one, I made it completely wrong. Here it is in review #68! Not good!

Back of the package (click to enlarge). Check out the instructions – this isn’t a single bowl of noodles, but rather a bowl of broth and a bowl of noodles that are enjoyed separately.

The noodle block.

The smaller packet, which seasons the broth.

Not a whole lot in this one.

The soybean paste which will coat the noodles.

This makes the noodles end up kind of like Jjajangmen but this is a Taiwanese version.

Here, Andy shows the proper technique: eat some noodles, slurp some soup!

Finished (click image to enlarge). Excellent! The noodles are nice – kind of stick together but that’s not a bad thing really. They have a slightly spicy and salty taste that is really nice. The broth cools the heat (Andy noticed that right away) and has a nice rich flavor. Good stuff – if you haven’t tried it, this is something unique people have really enjoyed. 4.0 out of 5.0 stars!  UPC bar code 4710199050484 .

Here’s a Wei Lih commercial!

The paste is also quite popular on its own – get it here.