Tag Archives: oil

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: TTL Sesame Oil Chicken Flavor With Rice Wine Instant Noodle – Taiwan

Meet The Manufacturer: #3033: TTL Sesame Oil Chicken Flavor With Rice Wine Instant Noodle - Taiwan

When I think of rice wine, my mind immediately goes to sake from Japan. I was surprised to find that there are many different kinds of rice wine – here’s a pretty extensive list from Wikipedia –

  • Apong – An Indian rice wine indigenous to the Mising tribe, from the Northeastern states of Assam and Arunachal Pradesh.
  • Ara – Bhutanese rice, millet, or maize wine
  • Brem – Balinese rice wine
  • Cheongju – a clear, refined rice wine from Korea
    • Beopju – a variety of cheongju
  • Cholai – A reddish rice wine from West Bengal, India
  • Choujiu – A milky glutinous rice wine popular in Xi’an, China
  • Dansul – a milky, sweet rice wine from Korea
  • Gwaha-ju – a fortified rice wine from Korea
  • Hariya – A white/watery rice wine from India.
  • Huangjiu – A Chinese fermented rice wine, literally “yellow wine” or “yellow liquor”, with colors varying from clear to brown or brownish red.
  • Lao-Lao – A clear rice wine from Laos
  • Lihing – Kadazan-Dusun rice wine from Sabah, Malaysian Borneo
  • Makgeolli – a milky rice wine from Korea
  • Mijiu – a clear, sweet Chinese rice wine/liqueur made from fermented glutinous rice.
  • Mirin – a Japanese rice wine used in cooking.
  • Rượu cần – Vietnamese rice wine drunk through long, thin bamboo tubes
  • Sake – A rice wine from Japan. The most widely known type of rice wine in North America because of its ubiquitous appearance in Japanese restaurants.
  • Sato – A rice wine originating in the Isan region of Thailand
  • Shaoxing – A rice wine from Shaoxing, Zhejiang province, China, probably the best known Chinese rice wine
  • Sombai – Cambodian infused rice wine with sugar cane, fruits and spices still inside the bottle
  • Sonti – Indian rice wine
  • Tapai – Rice wine derived from fermented rice in various Austronesiancultures
  • Tapuy – Clear rice wine from the Mountain Province in the Philippines
  • Tuak – Dayak rice wine (Kalimantan (Indonesian Borneo); Sarawak (Malaysian Borneo)

I will say, I think this is the type of wine that my mind went to at the outset, but I thought this list would be interesting to share. Let’s check this one out!

TTL Sesame Oil Chicken Flavor With Rice Wine Instant Noodle – Taiwan

Meet The Manufacturer: #3033: TTL Sesame Oil Chicken Flavor With Rice Wine Instant Noodle - Taiwan

Here’s detail of the lid (click to enlarge). Contains chicken. To prepare, add in all sachets but the retort pouch. Add boiling water to fill line and cover for 3 minutes. Use retort pouch to hold down lid. Add in retort pouch contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

Meet The Manufacturer: #3033: TTL Sesame Oil Chicken Flavor With Rice Wine Instant Noodle - Taiwan

The noodle block.

Meet The Manufacturer: #3033: TTL Sesame Oil Chicken Flavor With Rice Wine Instant Noodle - Taiwan

The dry base sachet.

Meet The Manufacturer: #3033: TTL Sesame Oil Chicken Flavor With Rice Wine Instant Noodle - Taiwan

Powder with bits and pieces.

Meet The Manufacturer: #3033: TTL Sesame Oil Chicken Flavor With Rice Wine Instant Noodle - Taiwan

A liquid sachet.

Meet The Manufacturer: #3033: TTL Sesame Oil Chicken Flavor With Rice Wine Instant Noodle - Taiwan

Seasoned sesame oil.

Meet The Manufacturer: #3033: TTL Sesame Oil Chicken Flavor With Rice Wine Instant Noodle - Taiwan

The liquor sachet.

Meet The Manufacturer: #3033: TTL Sesame Oil Chicken Flavor With Rice Wine Instant Noodle - Taiwan

Smells li ke rice wine.

Meet The Manufacturer: #3033: TTL Sesame Oil Chicken Flavor With Rice Wine Instant Noodle - Taiwan

The retort pouch.

Meet The Manufacturer: #3033: TTL Sesame Oil Chicken Flavor With Rice Wine Instant Noodle - Taiwan

Chunks of chicken and liquid.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, spring onion and Hachi habanero curry shichimi. The noodles hydrated exquisitely – not at all spongy which I thoroughly appreciated. The broth is complex – wolfberry was prevalent and a nice rich chicken and herbs flavor was throughout. Impressed. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 4710199077849.

Meet The Manufacturer: #3033: TTL Sesame Oil Chicken Flavor With Rice Wine Instant Noodle - Taiwan

National Geographic Traveler: Taiwan, 3rd edition

Watch me prepare these on an episode of Instant Noodle Recipe Time!

Meet The Manufacturer: #2863: Wu-Mu Man Dashi Noodle Master Noodles Mixed With Scallion Oil & Soy sauce

Meet The Manufacturer: #2863: Wu-Mu Man Dashi Noodles Mixed with Scallion, oil and soy sauce

Today we have the last of the straight noodle varieties from Wu-Mu’s Man Dashi range. Here’s what the company has to say about it –

●The noodles taste chewy and smooth.
●The carefully selected soy sauce, 100% brewed and no preservatives.
●The sweetness of the sauce and the fragrance of Scallion blend perfectly in the mouth, create a rich flavor.
●Rich fragrance creates easily the flavor of cooking master.

Alright – let’s begin.

Wu-Mu Man Dashi Noodle Master Noodles Mixed With Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce – Taiwan

Meet The Manufacturer: #2863: Wu-Mu Man Dashi Noodles Mixed with Scallion, oil and soy sauce

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Unsure whether it contains meat. To prepare, boil noodles for 3 1/2 minutes. Drain. Add in sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

Meet The Manufacturer: #2863: Wu-Mu Man Dashi Noodles Mixed with Scallion, oil and soy sauce

One of the two noodle bundles.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2863: Wu-Mu Man Dashi Noodles Mixed with Scallion, oil and soy sauce

The seasoning sauce sachet.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2863: Wu-Mu Man Dashi Noodles Mixed with Scallion, oil and soy sauce

Very thick.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion, sesame seeds and shichimi togarashi. The noodles were thick and had a little too much crumble for my liking. The flavoring was quite nice though – an almost sweet scallion taste to them as well as light on the saltiness. 3.5 out of 5.0 starts.  EAN bar code 4710175567920.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2863: Wu-Mu Man Dashi Noodles Mixed with Scallion, oil and soy sauce

Taiwan: A New History (East Gate Books)

The locale of this video reminds me of when I was in Taiwan in 2016 – a long stretch of the coast on the sdea.

#2592: Maruchan Yokozuna Tonkotsu Ramen

#2592: Maruchan Yokozuna Tonkotsu Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater - Box From Japan -

Here’s one sent by Javier over at Box From Japan. At Box From Japan, you can receive boxes of instant ramen from Japan as well as different subscription boxes like Japanese candy! Sounds interesting, doesn’t it? What’s more, in the two years I’ve been reviewing these, I’ve not ever received one that I’d reviewed before! So what is this Yokosuna all about? Well, I could be wrong, but it looks like Yokozuna is an echelon attained by Japanese sumo wrestlers. The Yokozuna are the best of the best. Let’s check it out!

#2592: Maruchan Yokozuna Tonkotsu Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater - Box From Japan -

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains meat. To prepare, add all but liquid sachet to bowl and add boiling water to fill line. Cover and steep for 5 minutes. Add in liquid base sachet. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2592: Maruchan Yokozuna Tonkotsu Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater - Box From Japan -

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2592: Maruchan Yokozuna Tonkotsu Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater - Box From Japan -

The noodle block.

#2592: Maruchan Yokozuna Tonkotsu Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater - Box From Japan -

A dry base sachet.

#2592: Maruchan Yokozuna Tonkotsu Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater - Box From Japan -

Powder base and some vegetable matter.

#2592: Maruchan Yokozuna Tonkotsu Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater - Box From Japan -

The liquid base sachet.

#2592: Maruchan Yokozuna Tonkotsu Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater - Box From Japan -

A rich liquid.

#2592: Maruchan Yokozuna Tonkotsu Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater - Box From Japan -

A garnish sachet.

#2592: Maruchan Yokozuna Tonkotsu Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater - Box From Japan -

Lots of vegetables!

#2592: Maruchan Yokozuna Tonkotsu Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater - Box From Japan -

Feels like something solid inside.

#2592: Maruchan Yokozuna Tonkotsu Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater - Box From Japan -

A free-dried ingredient block. These hydrate quite fast and usually contain vegetables.

Finished (click to enlarge). The noodles came out superbly with a good tooth and perfect gauge. The broth has a soy and oily thing going on which I really enjoyed. It is rich and full-bodied. The inclusion of meat from the freeze-dried block was very well done – especially since the quality made it very welcome. The vegetables went well and round out the bowl nicely. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.  JAN bar code 4901990327930.

#2592: Maruchan Yokozuna Tonkotsu Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater - Box From Japan -

Maruchan Instant Won-ton Soup, Soy Sauce Taste, 1.1oz(32g) X 6 Bowls (For 6 Servings)[Japan Import]

A TV spot for Maruchan Japan

Meet The Manufacturer: #2478: Kiki Noodles Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle

Meet The Manufacturer: #2478: Kiki Noodles Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi蔥油拌麵

Today we have the second of the Kiki Noodles products – the scallion oil and soy sauce. Definitely a lighter and more mild taste than a Sichuan peppercorn. These noodles come from Tainan in the south of Taiwan. Here’s some background on the city from Wikipedia –

Tainan, officially Tainan City is a special municipality of Taiwan, facing the Taiwan Strait in the west and south. Tainan is the oldest city on the island of Taiwan and also commonly known as the “Capital City” (府城; Fǔchéng; Hú-siâⁿ) for its over 200 years of history as the capital of Taiwan under Koxinga and later Qing dynasty rule. Tainan’s complex history of comebacks, redefinitions and renewals inspired its popular nickname “the Phoenix City”.

Tainan was initially established by the Dutch East India Company as a ruling and trading base called Fort Zeelandia during the period of Dutch rule on Taiwan. After Dutch colonists were defeated by Koxinga in 1661, Tainan remained as the capital of the Tungning Kingdom until 1683 and afterwards the capital of Taiwan Prefecture under Qing Dynasty rule until 1887, when the new provincial capital was moved to Taipei. Tainan has been historically regarded as one of the oldest cities in Taiwan, and its former name, Tayouan, has been claimed to be the origin of the name “Taiwan”. It is also one of Taiwan’s cultural capitals, for its rich folk cultures including the famous local snack food, extensively preserved Taoist rites and other living local traditions covering everything from child birth to funerals. The city houses the first Confucian school–temple, built in 1665,[9] the remains of the Eastern and Southern gates of the old city, and countless other historical monuments. Tainan claims more Buddhist and Taoist temples than any other city in Taiwan.

I can say from experience that Tainan is a really fascinating and amazing place. Indeed, if you visit Taiwan, you really must visit Tainan. Let’s give this second variety by Kiki Noodles a try!

Kiki Noodles Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle – Taiwan

Meet The Manufacturer: #2478: Kiki Noodles Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi蔥油拌麵

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, boil noodles in a pot for 3~5 minutes. Stir to loosen. Drain. Add to bowl and add sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

Meet The Manufacturer: #2478: Kiki Noodles Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi蔥油拌麵

One of the six servings in the large bag.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2478: Kiki Noodles Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi蔥油拌麵

The dry noodles.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2478: Kiki Noodles Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi蔥油拌麵

A liquid sachet.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2478: Kiki Noodles Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi蔥油拌麵

Has a nice scallion scent.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, sliced fishball and spring onion. The noodles are round in gauge and chewy in nature. The flavor is extremely good – definitely soy and scallion here. What I like is that it’s got a nice sweetness along with it. It seems so basic but it’s so tasty! 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. No barcode provided.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2478: Kiki Noodles Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi蔥油拌麵

Kiki Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle

A visit to Tainan, where these noodles come from.

Meet The Manufacturer: Interview With Kiki Noodle

Interview With Kiki Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - Meet The Manufacturer

Interview With Kiki Noodle * Product Samples From Kiki Noodle (1 of 3) * Product Samples From Kiki Noodle (2 of 3) * Product Samples From Kiki Noodle (3 of 3)Kiki Noodles Sichuan Spices Flavor NoodleKiki Noodles Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle

I got an email from someone at a company I’d never heard of with samples they wanted me to try. I love when this happens; happily,I get to try something new and learn some new things. In this case, a Taiwanese company called Kiki. Without further ado, let’s start things off with this interview with Chester Yeung of Kiki Noodle.

Interview With Kiki Noodle – Taiwan

THE RAMEN RATER> Thank you for agreeing to this interview! To start, can you tell my readers about the history of Kiki Noodle?

KIKI> We have been running our restaurant for 26 years focusing mainly in Sichuan cuisine. Having said that we always put healthy, tasty together with safety as our objectives. We focus very much on noodle – as a main staple food for the Easterners. By using our knowledge and experience in making food, we aim to develop our own type of noodles with the best taste and texture, so as to provide a convenience but yet healthy choice to customers. 2015 marks the birth of pre- packed KiKi noodle, a head start after 26 years of experience accumulation.

TRR> What was the first product you made?

KIKI> Our first pre- packed noodle are Kiki Noodle mixed with Sichuan Spices and Kiki Noodle mixed with Scallion oil & soy sauce

TRR> Your company is located in Taiwan. Can you tell us a little about your country?

KIKI> Taiwan is a beautiful island that dwells 23 million people, with mild climate, our people are friendly and welcoming

TRR> Can you tell us about the varieties of instant noodles you make?

KIKI> We currently producing 2 flavors- Sichuan spices and Scallion oil with soy Sauce. Very soon we will launch new flavor with aged vinegar based sauce mixed noodle with spicy and non- spicy options too

TRR> Why the name Kiki?

KIKI> As we said, the name KiKi is to carry on the brand name of our restaurant

TRR> In what countries are your products available?

KIKI> Apart from Taiwan, currently our product are sold in Hong Kong, China, Korea, Singapore and Australia

TRR> How does your noodle making process differ from other instant noodle manufacturers?

KIKI> Unlike the ordinary deep- fried instant noodle; We adopt the traditional noodle making method – air drying by daylight for 48 hours with absolute zero preservative added. By this mean, the natural flavor of wheat flour is retained in our noodle.

TRR> Are instant noodles the only products you make?

KIKI> We will also launch readymade numb and spicy sauce, seasoning powder and instant Sichuan meal etc.

TRR> A lot of people are concerned with their sodium intake. How would you recommend people enjoy your product as part of a healthy meal?

KIKI> Making Healthy and tasty food is being our main objective, and hence we have spent a lot of time in developing KiKi Noodle, I can tell you that our seasoning has lower sodium content than the other instant noodle. Thanks to the special formula of spices mix that developed in our restaurant

TRR> Are you involved in in your local community or participate in charities?

KIKI> We always actively involved in community activities including donation to those charities that taking care of the Social vulnerable groups.

TRR> Are there any new products coming soon?

KIKI> Definitely, we are quite busy at the moment since we have a packed schedule rolling out our new products including 2 new flavor for KiKi Noodle, instant pack for Sichuan Seasoning, numb & spicy sauce as well as seasoning powder.

TRR> When you make noodles for yourself, what do you like to add to them to make them extra special?

KIKI> I personally would go for a soft boil egg with runny yolk, together with some veggie and slices of meat, if I am staving, I would go for luncheon meat wih sunny side up egg.

THE RAMEN RATER> Thank you very much for this opportunity to learn about Kiki Noodle and your products!

Alright – let’s have a look at their products!

Meet The Manufacturer: #2312: Xiao Ban Mian Traditional Shallot & Onion Oil Noodle

Xiao Ban Mian Traditional Shallot & Onion Oil Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

During my trip to Taiwan in November of 2016, I had the opportunity to try the three varieties of the new Xiao Ban Mian line. I remember this one in particular; it was really quite good and I only got a bite or two of it – my sister actually scarfed this one down quickly! Now, back in the controlled environment of my noodle lab (sounds more amazing than it is, really), I’m really excited to give this a try. Let’s check it out!

Xiao Ban Mian Traditional Shallot & Onion Oil Noodle – Taiwan

Xiao Ban Mian Traditional Shallot & Onion Oil Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add noodles to a pot of boiling water and cook for 6-7 minutes. Drain. Add noodles, sachet contents and 2 tablespoons of water to a bowl. Stir and enjoy!

Xiao Ban Mian Traditional Shallot & Onion Oil Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Ther packages contain three servings. This is one of the servings of noodles.

Xiao Ban Mian Traditional Shallot & Onion Oil Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

A dry sachet.

Xiao Ban Mian Traditional Shallot & Onion Oil Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Shallot? Onion? Neither? It’s granular.

Xiao Ban Mian Traditional Shallot & Onion Oil Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

A liquid sachet.

Xiao Ban Mian Traditional Shallot & Onion Oil Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Has a nice kind of onion scent.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added fried onion, cucumber, pork and chilli flake. The noodles have a perfect gauge and chew. Furthermore, they come off extremely premium. The flavor is out of this world – Just a perfect marriage of shallot and sesame – goes together very well. There’s the perfect amount of flavor to this dish – not too salty, not bland. A perfect balance. I’m definitely thrilled to have tried this – mind blowing stuff! 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 4717011150278.

Xiao Ban Mian Traditional Shallot & Onion Oil Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Find Xiao  Ban Mian on Rakuten

A tour of the factory in Taichung where these noodles are manufactured.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Here’s one I’ve liked for a while . In fact, it’s on the Taiwanese op Ten list! I really like shrimp as well as onion! I thought since I’ve had the opportunity to try a nice amount of Taiwanese food now, I’d share this info about their food from wikipedia:

Pork, seafood, chicken, rice, and soy are very common ingredients. Beef is far less common, and some Taiwanese (particularly the elderly generation) still refrain from eating it.[1] This is in part due to the considerations of some Taiwanese Buddhists, a traditional reluctance towards slaughtering precious cattle needed for agriculture, and an emotional attachment and feeling of gratitude and thanks to the animals traditionally used for very hard labour.[1] However, due to influences from the influx of out of province Chinese in the early 1900s, the Taiwanese version of beef noodle soup is now one of the most popular dishes in Taiwan.

Taiwan’s cuisine has also been influenced by its geographic location. Living on a crowded island, the Taiwanese had to look aside from the farmlands for sources of protein. As a result, seafood figures prominently in their cuisine. This seafood encompasses many different things, from large fish such as tuna and grouper, to sardines and even smaller fish such as anchovies. Crustaceans, squid, and cuttlefish are also eaten.
A pork keⁿ, a thick soup with tofu and surimi-coated pork
Because of the island’s sub-tropical location, Taiwan has an abundant supply of various fruit, such as papayas, starfruit, melons, and citrus fruit. A wide variety of tropical fruits, imported and native, are also enjoyed in Taiwan. Other agricultural products in general are rice, corn, tea, pork, poultry, beef, fish, and other fruits and vegetables. Fresh ingredients in Taiwan are readily available from markets.

In many of their dishes, the Taiwanese have shown their creativity in their selection of spices. Taiwanese cuisine relies on an abundant array of seasonings for flavour: soy sauce, rice wine, sesame oil, fermented black beans, pickled radish, pickled mustard greens, peanuts, chili peppers, cilantro (sometimes called Chinese parsley), and a local variety of basil (九層塔; káu-chàn-tha̍h; “nine story pagoda”).

An important part of Taiwanese cuisine are xiaochi,[2] substantial snacks along the lines of Spanish tapas or Levantine meze.

The Taiwanese xiaochi has gained much reputation internationally. Many travelers go to Taiwan just for xiǎochī. The most common place to enjoy xiǎochī in Taiwan is in a night market. Each night market also has its own famous xiǎochī.

Moreover, the Taiwanese xiǎochī has been improving to a higher level. Nowadays, Taiwanese xiǎochī not only served in night markets but some luxury and high-end restaurants. The prices usually jump 100% or even higher in the restaurants. Also, the Taiwanese government supports the Taiwanese xiǎochī and has held national xiǎochī events in Taiwan regularly.

Let’s give this one a try.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor – Taiwan

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains shrimp. To prepare, boil a pot of water. Add in noodle block and cook for 5 1/2 minutes. Drain. Finally, add in sachet contents. Stir and enjoy!

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

The package contains 4 servings like this.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

The noodle block.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

A dry sachet.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Looks like shrimp and chives perhaps?

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

A liquid sachet.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Dark – maybe soy sauce.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

A second liquid sachet.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

The onion oil.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spiralized carrot, sliced spring onion and a shrimp. Good gauge and chew once again to these fine noodles. The flavor is amazing! I gave it 5 stars last time but I feel like I should give it 6 although that isn’t possible! The taste is a great shrimp and onion fusion – sweet and absolutely delicious. Okay, I’m saying it. yummy. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 4717011150018.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Find Mom’s Dry Noodle Products at Rakuten

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp among other varieties being featured on a popular Taiwanese TV show.

#2306: Nissin Demae Iccho Black Garlic Oil Tonkotsu Flavour Instant Noodle

#2306: Nissin  Demae Iccho Black Garlic Oil Tonkotsu Flavour Instant Noodle - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater

Here’s yet another left from the Nissin Hong Kong Meet The Manufacturer – thanks again! Today it’s the cup version of their black garlic oil tonkotsu. Indeed, black garlic is an interesting thing – here’s what Wikipedia has to say about it –

Black garlic is a type of caramelized garlic (a Maillard reaction, not fermentation) first used as a food ingredient in Asian cuisine. It is made by heating whole bulbs of garlic (Allium sativum) over the course of several weeks, a process that results in black cloves. The taste is sweet and syrupy with hints of balsamic vinegar[1] or tamarind.[2] Black garlic’s popularity has spread to the United States as it has become a sought-after ingredient used in high-end cuisine.

Alright – let’s check it out!

Nissin  Demae Iccho Black Garlic Oil Tonkotsu Flavour Instant Noodle – Hong Kong

#2306: Nissin  Demae Iccho Black Garlic Oil Tonkotsu Flavour Instant Noodle - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains pork and chicken. To prepare, add boiling water to fill line and cover for 3 minutes. Finally, add in contants of sachet. Stir and enjoy!

#2306: Nissin  Demae Iccho Black Garlic Oil Tonkotsu Flavour Instant Noodle - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2306: Nissin  Demae Iccho Black Garlic Oil Tonkotsu Flavour Instant Noodle - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater

The noodle block.

#2306: Nissin  Demae Iccho Black Garlic Oil Tonkotsu Flavour Instant Noodle - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater

Loose seasoning and solid ingredients from the cup.

#2306: Nissin  Demae Iccho Black Garlic Oil Tonkotsu Flavour Instant Noodle - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater

The oil sachet (attached to the lid).

#2306: Nissin  Demae Iccho Black Garlic Oil Tonkotsu Flavour Instant Noodle - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater

That’s some dark, black oil!

#2306: Nissin  Demae Iccho Black Garlic Oil Tonkotsu Flavour Instant Noodle - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion, Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts and chashu pork. To begin with, the noodles are decent – nice chewiness and big quantity for a cup. Next, the broth has a hearty tonkotsu taste. Moreover, the broth has a very nice look to it; creamy but with the oil giving it a unique look as well. Indeed, the garlic oil gives it a little extra tastiness which is nice. Finally, bits of vegetable, egg and pork abound! 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 4897878150083.

#2306: Nissin  Demae Iccho Black Garlic Oil Tonkotsu Flavour Instant Noodle - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater

Nissin Demae Black  Garlic Oil Instant Ramen Noodles 30 Packs

A Nissin Hong Kong TV spot.

Meet The Manufacturer: #1935: Love Cook Guanmiao Dried Noodles With Oleum Sesami

Today, we bid a fond farewell to the Love Cook Meet The Manufacturer. Been nice to try some new varieties from Taiwan lately! Oleum sesami is the scientific term for sesame oil. Very curious about this one! Let’s take a look!

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, boil a pot of water and add noodle block. Cook for 3 minutes. Drain and add sachet contents. Stir and enjoy!

One of the five packs like this contained in the big pack.

These are the thinnest noodles we’ve seen yet by this brand.

The liquid sachet.

Definitely has a sesame scent.

2016_1_18_1935_008a

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion, boiled pork and sesame seeds. these noodles are thinner. They still have a very strong chewiness to them which is nice. The flavor is definitely sesame oil and some other flavors in there. Strong and coats everything nicely. 3.75 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 4719863231181.

Tainan City of Culture and Life

A slideshow of places to visit as a tourist in Tainan, Taiwan.

#1640: Long Jun Hang Tainan Yi Mien With Onion Oil Sauce

These tend to be a little hard to figure out; what flavor? What brand? Luckily, I had help from Bobby Y. on the first of these I found, and knowing some of the standard flavors of Taiwanese instants, the translation I got of a page that came up from the bar code on Google was logical. Anyways, Let’s try this onion oil flavor Taiwanese noodle offering.

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, boil a pot of water and cook noodles for 3 minutes. Drain. Add in contents of liquid sachet and stir. Enjoy!

The noodle block.

The onion oil sauce sachet.

Has a kind of onion soy scent.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added spring onion. The noodles are rather chewy and almost a little rubbery. The flavor was light and kind of off-putting in after taste. Nonetheless, it did flavor all the noodles and wasn’t bland. 2.0 out of 5.0 stars.EAN bar code 4719863230658.

TAINAN DRIED NOODLES – GREEN ONION 2x600G

This lady is really happy to be in Taiwan!

Meet The Manufacturer: #1457: Nissin Chu Qian Yi Ding Sesame Oil Flavour Instant Noodles With Soup Base

Many of you familiar with the sight of this package may say – hey waitta minute – what are you calling this? In fact, this is known by a few names! Here in the United States, it’s called Nissin Demae Ramen. In Japan, the four characters in big print translate to Demae Iccho. In Singapore however, Chinese is often spoken, and they translate to Chu Qian Yi Ding. I’m pretty sure it means something like delivery boy’ or something – the little guy on the package. Anyways, this is pretty easily gotten the world over, however this is the Singaporean made one! Let’s check it out!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. to prepare, add noodles to 450ml boiling water and cook for 3 minutes. Add contents of sachets and stir well. Enjoy!

The noodle block.

Dry soup base sachet.

A light powder.

The sesame oil sachet.

Has a strong sesame scent!

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added mung bean sprouts, sliced green onion, and sauteed beef and tofu with soy sauce. The noodles have a great chewiness to them. It’s been a while since I’ve had any Demae Ramen type noodles and I’m quite pleased. The broth has a nice soy flavor with a good hit of sesame which sets it off. 3.75 out of 5.0 stars.EAN bar code number 8888279210014.


Check it out – so these are made in Hong Kong. I’ve been recommending to people to try this set quite often as it represents a beginner’s way to enter the noodle realm.

A TV spot for a couple other varieties of Nissin Chu Qian Yi Ding.