Tag Archives: fried noodle

#2804: Acecook Chinese Style Yakisoba

#2804: Acecook Chinese Style Yakisoba

Here’s one I found up in Canada at Osaka Market in Yaohan Centre, which is in Richmond, BC. Sometimes they’ll have a bunch of interesting varieties that are there for a short period and this is one of them./ Let’s see what’s going on here – wasn’t able to find a whole lot about this one. At least I know how to cook it, right? Let’s begin!

Acecook Chinese Style Yakisoba – Japan

#2804: Acecook Chinese Style Yakisoba

Detail of the outer wraps (click to enlarge). Guessing this contains meat and fish. To prepare, add in vegetable sachet and boiling water to fill line. Cover for 3 minutes. Use spout to drain. Add in liquid base sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2804: Acecook Chinese Style Yakisoba

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2804: Acecook Chinese Style Yakisoba

The noodle block.

#2804: Acecook Chinese Style Yakisoba

A liquid base sachet.

#2804: Acecook Chinese Style Yakisoba

Looks like a rather complex sauce.

#2804: Acecook Chinese Style Yakisoba

The vegetables sachet.

#2804: Acecook Chinese Style Yakisoba

Spring onion among other things.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts. The noodles came out well – nice gauge and chew. The flavor was a kind of overly salted one with a lots of greasiness. Not to say it was bad though – I liked it. The included vegetables were pretty good as well. 3.5 out of 5.0 stars.  JAN bar code 4901071207410.

#2804: Acecook Chinese Style Yakisoba

Acecook JANJAN yakisoba Kokusosu 104g ~ 12 pieces

Hey look it’s Charles Barkley

#2798: Indomie Instant Noodles Mi Goreng Fried Noodles (Taiwan-only Version)

#2798: Indomie Instant Noodles Mi Goreng Fried Noodles (Taiwan-only Version)

Alright so about these – I received a 5-pack from the nice folks at the Indomie booth at the Taiwan International Food Expo in Taipei, Taiwan in November 2017. I asked a little about them. This pack you see here is specifically for Taiwan. So, what’s different? Well for starters, lots of Chinese on the pack. The main difference however is the actual soizie of the package. This one’s a little bit bigger than the ones found elsewhere, and this is unique to Taiwan. You can’t get them like this anywhere else in the world. Period. A huge difference? No, but still a difference. Here’s a little info from Wikipedia –

Indomie is a brand of Instant noodle by Indofood, the largest instant noodle manufacturer in Indonesia, with a market share of 72%.[1] It is distributed in Australia, Asia, Africa, New Zealand, the United States, Canada, Europe, The Philippines, and Middle Eastern countries. Outside its main manufacturing plants in Indonesia, Indomie is also produced in Nigeria since 1995 where it is a popular brand and has the largest instant noodle manufacturing plant in Africa.[2]

The “Mi Goreng” (“stir fry“) range of instant noodles by Indomie, based on the Indonesian dish Mie goreng, entered the market in 1983 and are distributed in North America, Europe, Africa, Australasia and various regions in Asia. The brand flavours are sold in varying weight packets, around 85 g, and contain two sachets of flavourings. The first sachet has three segments and carries the liquid condiments: sweet soy saucechilli sauce, and seasoning oil with garlic flakes. The other sachet has two segments for dry seasoning powder and flake of fried shallot. In some regions, Indomie Mi goreng is also available in jumbo (120 gram) packs.[15]

In 2006, Indomie launched a new variant Indomie Mi Goreng Kriuuk.. 8x. In this product, 8x means “Lebih banyak, Lebih renyah, Lebih gurih, Lebih gede” (“more noodles, crunchier, more savory, larger”), in three flavours: Chicken, Onion, Spicy. Indomie Mi Goreng is certified halal.

Indomie Mi Goreng contains phenylalanine, so individuals suffering from phenylketonuria should avoid the seasoning. Indomie Mi Goreng also contains monosodium glutamate (MSG, listed as flavour enhancer 621).

Additionally flavour enhancer 631 can be prepared from meat extract and/or dried sardines, but it can also be created via a microbial synthesis process from a vegetable source,[16] and flavour enhancer 627 is isolated from sardines and/or yeast extract. The inclusion of flavour enhancer 631 and the way it was prepared means Indomie Mi Goreng may or may not be suitable for vegetarians and vegans.

Note that last line there. Okay so for all of you asking for a top ten vegetarian list – that’s why there isn’t one. Digging through ingredient lists all over and especially ones with these flavor enhancers would be a serious job. Not gonna happen! Anyways, let’s open this one up and have a look!

Indomie Instant Noodles Mi Goreng Fried Noodles – Taiwan

#2798: Indomie Instant Noodles Mi Goreng Fried Noodles (Taiwan-only Version)

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add noodle block to 400ml boiling water and cook for 3 minutes. Drain. Add sachet contents except for onion. Stir well. finally, sprinkle fried onion on top and enjoy!

#2798: Indomie Instant Noodles Mi Goreng Fried Noodles (Taiwan-only Version)

The noodle block.

#2798: Indomie Instant Noodles Mi Goreng Fried Noodles (Taiwan-only Version)

A dual sachet.

#2798: Indomie Instant Noodles Mi Goreng Fried Noodles (Taiwan-only Version)

Powder base.

#2798: Indomie Instant Noodles Mi Goreng Fried Noodles (Taiwan-only Version)

Fried onion garnish.

#2798: Indomie Instant Noodles Mi Goreng Fried Noodles (Taiwan-only Version)

A trio of liquid sachets: from left to right: chilli sauce, sweet soy sauce and seasoned oil.

#2798: Indomie Instant Noodles Mi Goreng Fried Noodles (Taiwan-only Version)

The three co-mingle in a wonderfully scented hot mess.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added mung bean sprouts. The noodles have that standard gauge with a slight backbone which works so well. The flavor is great as always – sweet, spicy, salty, just right. I will use the y-word here. Yummy. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 8994963000783.

#2798: Indomie Instant Noodles Mi Goreng Fried Noodles (Taiwan-only Version)

Indomie Variety Pack – 1 Case (30 Bags)

An Indomie TV spot

#2709: KOKA Signature Black Pepper Fried Noodles

#2709: KOKA Signature Black Pepper Fried Noodles - Singapore - Tat Hui - The Ramen Rater

Well, I thought I was out of KOKA varieties to review and only had a couple duplicates but nope – nada – still got more! See, there are KOKA Signature and KOKA Delight which both look about the same and often have the same flavors. What’s the difference? Well, KOKA Delight is baked noodles – not fried. So I’ve still got a few varieties left. This one is a black pepper flavor noodle – without broth. Black pepper is an interesting thing – very historic as well. Let’s see if I can find something from Wikipedia –

Black peppercorns were found stuffed in the nostrils of Ramesses II, placed there as part of the mummification rituals shortly after his death in 1213 BCE.[22] Little else is known about the use of pepper in ancient Egypt and how it reached the Nile from South Asia.

Pepper (both long and black) was known in Greece at least as early as the 4th century BCE, though it was probably an uncommon and expensive item that only the very rich could afford.

A Roman era trade route from India to Italy

By the time of the early Roman Empire, especially after Rome’s conquest of Egypt in 30 BCE, open-ocean crossing of the Arabian Sea direct to southern India‘s Malabar Coast was near routine. Details of this trading across the Indian Ocean have been passed down in the Periplus of the Erythraean Sea. According to the Roman geographer Strabo, the early Empire sent a fleet of around 120 ships on an annual one-year trip to China, Southeast Asia, India and back. The fleet timed its travel across the Arabian Sea to take advantage of the predictable monsoon winds. Returning from India, the ships travelled up the Red Sea, from where the cargo was carried overland or via the Nile-Red Sea canal to the Nile River, barged to Alexandria, and shipped from there to Italy and Rome. The rough geographical outlines of this same trade route would dominate the pepper trade into Europe for a millennium and a half to come.

Pepper was so valuable that it was often used as collateral or even currency. In the Dutch language, “pepper expensive” (peperduur) is an expression for something very expensive. The taste for pepper (or the appreciation of its monetary value) was passed on to those who would see Rome fall. Alaric the Visigoth included 3,000 pounds of pepper as part of the ransom he demanded from Rome when he besieged the city in 5th century.[24] After the fall of Rome, others took over the middle legs of the spice trade, first the Persians and then the Arabs; Innes Miller cites the account of Cosmas Indicopleustes, who travelled east to India, as proof that “pepper was still being exported from India in the sixth century”.[25] By the end of the Early Middle Ages, the central portions of the spice trade were firmly under Islamic control. Once into the Mediterranean, the trade was largely monopolized by Italian powers, especially Venice and Genoa. The rise of these city-states was funded in large part by the spice trade.

One tablespoon (6 grams) of ground black pepper contains moderate amounts of vitamin K (13% of the daily value or DV), iron (10% DV) and manganese (18% DV), with trace amounts of other essential nutrientsprotein and dietary fibre.[42]

It is commonly believed that during the Middle Ages, pepper was used to conceal the taste of partially rotten meat. There is no evidence to support this claim, and historians view it as highly unlikely: in the Middle Ages, pepper was a luxury item, affordable only to the wealthy, who certainly had unspoiled meat available as well.[27] In addition, people of the time certainly knew that eating spoiled food would make them sick. Similarly, the belief that pepper was widely used as a preservative is questionable: it is true that piperine, the compound that gives pepper its spiciness, has some antimicrobial properties, but at the concentrations present when pepper is used as a spice, the effect is small.[28] Salt is a much more effective preservative, and salt-cured meatswere common fare, especially in winter. However, pepper and other spices certainly played a role in improving the taste of long-preserved meats.

I always thought it was mayonnaise that was used to cover the taste of rotted meat… Well, you learn something new every day – even if it isn’t correct. Let’s look within!

KOKA Signature Black Pepper Fried Noodles – Singapore

#2709: KOKA Signature Black Pepper Fried Noodles - Singapore - Tat Hui - The Ramen Rater

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains fish. To prepare, add noodle block to 400ml boiling water and cook 2 minutes. Drain. Add in sachet contents and combine. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2709: KOKA Signature Black Pepper Fried Noodles - Singapore - Tat Hui - The Ramen Rater

The noodle block.

#2709: KOKA Signature Black Pepper Fried Noodles - Singapore - Tat Hui - The Ramen Rater

A dual sachet.

#2709: KOKA Signature Black Pepper Fried Noodles - Singapore - Tat Hui - The Ramen Rater

A peppery powder.

#2709: KOKA Signature Black Pepper Fried Noodles - Singapore - Tat Hui - The Ramen Rater

Oil.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Dodo fish balls, coriander, fried onion from Waroeng Jajanan, and Salad Cosmo organic mung bean sprouts. The noodles came out as expected – nice gauge and chew and good for a dry instant noodle dish. The flavor was a nice black pepper one – not too strong that it’s unbearable – just right in this one. It coats everything but isn’t soupy at all. 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 8888056820016.

#2709: KOKA Signature Black Pepper Fried Noodles - Singapore - Tat Hui - The Ramen Rater

Koka Instant Noodles B l a c k   P e p p e r  Flavor 85g. Pack 5

KF Seetoh shows you how to make this popular singaporean crab

Meet The Manufacturer: #2661: Maitri Vegetarian Mie Goreng

Meet The Manufacturer: #2661: Maitri Vegetarian Fried Noodles

Maitri is Olagafood’s vegetarian product line. So far, I’ve been pretty impressed; the flavors are quite good and it’s been a lot of fun reviewing them. This one is a vegetarian mie goreng – here’s a little about mie goreng from Wikipedia –

Mie goreng (Indonesianmie goreng or mi gorengMalaymee goreng or mi goreng; both meaning “fried noodles”[3]), also known as bakmi goreng,[4] is a flavourful and spicy fried noodle dish common in Indonesia,[1][5]MalaysiaBrunei Darussalam and Singapore. It is made with thin yellow noodles fried in cooking oil with garliconion or shallots, fried prawnchickenbeef, or sliced bakso (meatballs), chili, Chinese cabbagecabbagestomatoesegg, and other vegetables. Ubiquitous in Indonesia, it can be found everywhere in the country, sold by all food vendors from street-hawkers, warungs, to high-end restaurants. It is an Indonesian one-dish meal favourite, although street food hawkers commonly sell it together with nasi goreng (fried rice).[6] It is commonly available at Mamak stalls in Singapore, Brunei Darussalam and Malaysia and is often spicy.

I’m really excited about this series – and the fact that I’m getting some help from a local business. Jonathan over at Waroeng Jajanan. The store and restaurant combo is just an amazing place to check out authentic Indonesian cuisine, and you’ll be seeing a lot of (pretty much all) that I add in the end being from there in this series. Alright – let’s check out this one from Maitri as part of Meet The Manufacturer!

Maitri Vegetarian Fried Noodles – Indonesia

Meet The Manufacturer: #2661: Maitri Vegetarian Fried Noodles

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, boil noodles for 3 minutes and drain. Add in sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

Meet The Manufacturer: #2661: Maitri Vegetarian Fried Noodles

The noodle block.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2661: Maitri Vegetarian Fried Noodles

A dual sachet.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2661: Maitri Vegetarian Fried Noodles

Chilli powder atop seasoning base.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2661: Maitri Vegetarian Fried Noodles

A liquid sachet.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2661: Maitri Vegetarian Fried Noodles

Oil and kecap manis (sweet soy sauce).

Meet The Manufacturer: #2661: Maitri Vegetarian Fried Noodles

A garnish sachet.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2661: Maitri Vegetarian Fried Noodles

Crispy fried radish chips.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2661: Maitri Vegetarian Fried Noodles

Finished (click to enlarge). Added (prepared by Waroeng Jajanan) sambal goreng gentong, Indonesian pickle, crackers, (from my kitchen) tau pok, Dua Belibis and Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts. The noodles as before lending themselves quite nicely to making mi goreng. The taste isn’t extremely spicy, nor is it overly salty or sweet – kind of like a nice starting point to add things to. Not only that, many vegetarian variants have a kind of funky broccoli or mushroom taste – not this one. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 034126937254.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2654: Maitri Vegetarian Hot Curry Flavor - Indonesia - Olagafood - The Ramen Rater

50 Delicious Vegetarian C u r r y Recipes That Everyone Can Enjoy

Wow, what a bargain!

#2438: World O’Noodle Mi Goreng Original Flavour Fried Noodles

 

#2438: World O'Noodle Mi Goreng Original Flavour Fried Noodles - Indonesia - The Ramen Rater - instant noodle

I found this one during my November 2016 trip to Taiwan. So this was at a Jason’s Market at the bottom of the Taipei 101. Mi Goreng is a very popular stir nodle dish. Mi Goreng instant noodles are most well known from Indonesia, indeed where this one is from. Let’s see what Wikipedia has to say about Mi Goreng –

Mie goreng (Indonesian: mie goreng or mi goreng; Malay: mee goreng or mi goreng; both meaning “fried noodles”[3]), also known as bakmi goreng, is a flavorful and spicy fried noodle dish common in Indonesia,[1]Malaysia, and Singapore. It is made with thin yellow noodles fried in cooking oil with garlic, onion or shallots, fried prawn, chicken, beef, or sliced bakso (meatballs), chili, Chinese cabbage, cabbages, tomatoes, egg, and other vegetables. Ubiquitous in Indonesia, it can be found everywhere in the country, sold by all food vendors from street-hawkers, warungs, to high-end restaurants. It is an Indonesian one-dish meal favorite, although street food hawkers commonly sell it together with nasi goreng (fried rice).[4] It is commonly available at Mamak stalls in Singapore and Malaysia and is often spicy.

Sounds good – I’ve been a fan of mi goreng for decades now! So let’s give this one a try.

World O’Noodle Mi Goreng Original Flavour Fried Noodles – Indonesia

The import sticker (click to enlarge).

#2438: World O'Noodle Mi Goreng Original Flavour Fried Noodles - Indonesia - The Ramen Rater - instant noodle

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains chicken. To prepare, add noodle block to 450~500mL boiling water and cook 2~3 minutes. Drain well. Add in contents of all sachets except shallots. Stir well. Finally, garnish with shallot and enjoy!

#2438: World O'Noodle Mi Goreng Original Flavour Fried Noodles - Indonesia - The Ramen Rater - instant noodle

The noodle block.

#2438: World O'Noodle Mi Goreng Original Flavour Fried Noodles - Indonesia - The Ramen Rater - instant noodle

A dual sachet.

#2438: World O'Noodle Mi Goreng Original Flavour Fried Noodles - Indonesia - The Ramen Rater - instant noodle

Powdered seasonings.

#2438: World O'Noodle Mi Goreng Original Flavour Fried Noodles - Indonesia - The Ramen Rater - instant noodle

Fried shallot.

#2438: World O'Noodle Mi Goreng Original Flavour Fried Noodles - Indonesia - The Ramen Rater - instant noodle

A sachet trifecta! So we have (from left to right) seasoned oil, sweet chilli sauce and finally sweet soy sauce.

#2438: World O'Noodle Mi Goreng Original Flavour Fried Noodles - Indonesia - The Ramen Rater - instant noodle

The liquid ingredients mingling together.

mi goreng

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, kerupuk aci, coriander, fried egg and Dua Belibis sweet chilli sauce. The noodles are the perfect gauge for instant mi goreng – their chew is excellent as well. Indeed the quantity is decent too. Moreover, the flavor just hits everything perfectly – the sweet, the salty, the spicy. A solidly excellent mi goreng. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 9557428000873.

mi goreng

Cradle of Flavor: Home Cooking from the Spice Islands of Indonesia, Singapore, and Malaysia

Mie goreng being prepared at a hawker stall.

#2282: Samyang Foods Gold Jjamppong Fried Noodle

I’ve liked jjamppong for a while now. For those of you not familiar with it, it’s kind of like a spicy Korean seafood hnoodle soup. Let’s check it out!

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains seafood. To prepare, add noodles and sachet contents (except the oil) to 550ml boiling water for 5 minutes. Add in oil. Stir and enjoy!

The noodle block.

The soup base.

A lot of spicy smelling stuff!

The solid ingredients sachet.

Vegetables and seafood.

An oil sachet.

Spicy oil!

Finished (click to enlarge). Added carved squid, pork, shrimp, chopped garlic and spring onion and sauteed with La-Yu chilli oil and added. The noodles are very good – thick, slightly wide and chewy. Definitely on the gourmet spectrum. The broth has a rich kind of smoky and spicy seafood taste to it which is really great. The included garnish hydrated very well. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 8801073113213.

Samyang Godd Jjambbong Spicy Noodle Soup Ramen 5-pack

If you want to make jjamppong from scratch, check out this recipe! Maangchi makes a lot of videos on Korean cooking – great stuff!

#2270: Samyang Foods Fresh Bibimmyun Fried Noodle

The first time I tried bibimmyun a long time ago I really didn’t get it. Spicy, sweet, and worst of all, it was cold. Yep – when I first started reviewing, the thought of cold noodles made me cringe. I found this one recently at HMart and honestly have been holding back on it since I just reviewed a bibimmyun a couple weeks ago – but no more. It’s getting colder outside – rainy too. Bibimmyun is really a dish for the hot summer months when something cool and refreshing really hits the spot. Well, maybe there will be a sun break today even though the forecast is for 10 days straight of rain… Let’s check this one out!

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add noodle block and vegetable sachet contents to 600ml boiling water and cook for 4 minutes. Drain and rinse well with cold water. Add in contents of liquid sachet. Stir and enjoy!

The noodle block.

The liquid sachet.

Has a sweet and spicy scent.

The vegetables sachet.

Lots of stuff in there!

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, hard boiled egg and red pepper strands. The noodles really got thick and were of good quality here. The sauce was good – very standard kind of bibimmyun flavor most brands have. The vegetables hydrated well but were kind of unremarkable. Nonetheless, a nice plate of bibimmyun. 3.75 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 8801073113251.

Samyang BIBIM MEN Oriental Style Noodle Spicy Cold Ramen 5-pack (Mi Kho Dai Han)

Samyang Foods makes the famous Fire Noodle Challenge noodle – here’s a recent video from them.

#2075: Mi Sedaap Mi Segera Mi Goreng Ayam Krispi

Time for some mi goreng! So this is another one I found at the Uwajimaya in Renton, WA by where my son goes to Pokemon League. Today’s a weird day; the local power company has been going from apartment building to apartment building and repairing these big green power boxes outside. I’m guessing that the power could go out at any minute! I guess We’ll see – let’s get started!

Detail of the distributor’s sticker (click to enlarge).Looks to be meat free but check for yourself.

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). To prepare, add noodle block to a pot of water and boil for 3 minutes. Drain. Add in powder and liquid ingredients and stir. Sprinkle crispi bits on top. Enjoy!

The noodle block.

The powder base.

A light powder.

A triple sachet – from left to right, seasoned oil, sweet chilli sauce and sweet soy sauce.

The liquid mingling together.

The krispi garnish sachet.

Lots of little bits!

Finished (click to enlarge). Added kerapuk aci, Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, baked chicken, fried egg and coriander. The noodles have a nice gauge and mouthfeel. The flavor is a kind of sweet and spicy barbecue chicken taste which was very good although a little sweeter than expected. The crispy element of the garnish was good, however in lieu of quantity, less pieces that were larger would have been better I think. 4.5 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 8998866803809.

Mi Sedaap Crispy Chicken Fried Instant Noodle 3.1 oz – Pack of 20 pcs

A TV commercial for Mi Sedaap Ayam Krispi Mi Goreng.

#1699: Vit’s Mi Goreng Pedas Chewy & Springy

Mi Goreng means fried noodles and Pedas means spicy – how can ya beat that? This is one that I picked up at the Econsave on last year’s trip to Penang, Malaysia. I gotta say – it’s weird to say that. I never thought I’d end up making it to Asia; now having been to both Malaysia and Thailand, it’s like I’ve got a different perspective of the world. So many of the people I met over there had visited the United States, either for work or schooling. How many folks do I know from here that have gone the opposite direction though? Definitely a lower ratio at least in my experience. It is quite expensive and I’ve been lucky that companies have said ‘hey! come visit us!’ Instant noodles – who would’ve thought. Anyways, I’ve been a big fan of Mi Goreng for quite a while. It’s combination of sweet and spicy flavors has always been so nice. This one promises to a bit further on the end of the spicy stick – hoping so! Spicy is always nice. Let’s check out this mi goreng by Vit’s of Malaysia!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add noodle block to 450ml boiling water and simmer for 3 minutes. Drain. Add in seasoning powder and oil sachets. Stir well. Garnish with fried onion and enjoy!

The noodle block.

Although this sachet mentions soup, this is a brothless noodle!

A light powder.

Seasoned oil and sweet soy sauce sachets.

The two co-mingling together.

The fried onion garnish.

Crunchy stuff!

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added shrimp, red bell pepper, hard boiled egg with Dua Belibis chilli sauce and coriander. The noodles were as advertised – chewy and springy. They had a thicker gauge than I expected. The flavor does indeed have a nice kick of spiciness as well as the well-known attributes of mi goreng such as a sweetness from the thick soy sauce. However, everything kind of seemed a little on the dry side even with the oil. The onions are a nice touch. 3.5 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 9556354000353.

Singapore & Penang Street Food: Cooking and Travelling in Singapore and Malaysia (from Amazon) Singapore and Penang have a lot in common both in culinary and cultural terms. For centuries they have been at a crossroads of ancient trade, and immigration, giving them a strong multicultural personality. Singapore & Penang Street Food shows the authentic taste of delicious street food in Malaysia and how the street-food scene in Singapore has become more food court nowadays. Regulated out of existence years ago, street food vendors moved into hawker centers where even the most delicate stomachs have the opportunity to partake. Strict safety and hygiene regulations make Singapore’s hawker food some of the safest street food around, keeping high standards of tastiness and authenticity. Beside five different Chinese cuisines, Singapore also offers Indian, Malaysian, Indonesian and Thai street-food dishes. In Penang you will find similar dishes but with a different touch, a different interpretation. The range of regional varieties is endless.

[youtube url=url= https://youtu.be/04bcvXUNbJs[Here’s an advertisement for Vit’s instant noodles.

Meet The Manufacturer: #1472: Ruski Chicken Masala Flavour Instant Fried Noodles

Mi Goreng! It sounds exotic, but it boils down to fried noodles. This is a rather unique one – I don’t think I’ve heard of a masala chicken dry noodle like this before, but it sounds pretty good! It’s been a while since I’ve had any mi goreng, and my son is here today and wants some so I thought why not. Let’s check it out!

As summer winds down, my thoughts return to the days when school’s ugly head would be rearing soon. My son Andy goes back to school September 3rd! Fourth grade… I will definitely say Fourth wasn’t the worst grade I experienced, although it was pretty bad. I’m really hoping he has a much better experience than I did. Here he is doing up a post about his new school stuff. I told him he needed to write some thoughts about his upcoming school year – he tried to weasel out of it, but I bribed him so it should be an interesting post. Quite a setup he’s got in his room – mostly hand me downs, but works for an aspiring blogger. Anyways, onward!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, ass noodles to a bowl and add 400cc boiling water and cover for 3 minutes. Drain well. Add in sachet contents and stir until combined. Enjoy!

The noodle block.

The dry seasoning sachet.

Has a very present masala scent.

The oil sachet.

Has a kind of onion scent.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added sweet onions, grilled chicken, coriander, krupuk aci, cherry tomato, fried egg, Dua Belibis chilli sauce and BonCabe Level 15 chilli seasoning. The noodles came out nicely – a little fluffy which was alright. The flavor was a definitely masala and chicken kind of thing that worked pretty well! 3.75 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 8852523208792.


Here’s the MAMA version of Mi Goreng.

Here’s a recipe for Indian Mi Goreng by KF Seetoh. Who’s he? He’s the guru of Southeast Asian street food and there are tons of his Makansutra videos on YouTube – check him out!

#1390: Indomie Mi Goreng Rasa Iga Penyet

Here’s one I’ve been waiting for just the right day to try. Iga Penyet is a dish which is extremely popular in Jakarta, Indonesia. But, exactly what is it? Well, from looking around, I found that it translates to Smashed Beef Ribs ala Jakarta. I’ve also seen it referred to as Fried Beef Ribs. Either way, beef ribs and a spicy sambal sauce are involved, as well as garlic. I didn’t have any beef ribs to cook alongside, but I’ll figure something out – let’s check out this Indomie Iga Penyet!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Not sure if it contains meat so check for yourself. To prepare, boil 400ml water. Add the noodle block and cook for 3 minutes. While it cooks, put sachet contents in a bowl. When done, drain the noodles. Transfer to bowl and stir until combined. Enjoy!

The noodle block.

A dual dry ingredient sachet: seasoning base on the left, chilli powder on the right.

The chilli powder atop the seasoning base. Notice the little bits intermixed in the base.

A dual sachet of liquid ingredients: seasoned oil on the left and sweet soy sauce (known as kecap manis) on the right.

Interesting. Has a nice beef scent.

Thick, black sweet soy sauce.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Sauteed some beef with Walla Walla sweet onion, minced garlic and BonCabe Level 10 chilli seasoning, and added a folded fried egg with some ABC manis pedas sauce. The noodles are classic Indomie – great texture and feel – nothing more, nothing less. The flavor is different; it’s got the sweetness and spiciness, but the beef taste is rich. It lingers. Definitely something different with this one and I can see why it’s popular. 4.75 out of 5..0 – worthy stuff!UPC bar code 089686043686.

Here’s a Master Chef preparing Indomie Iga Penyet in a special way.

#1258: Meet The Manufacturer: President Chicken Flavoured Fried Noodle

This is an interesting one; there’s ABC and there’s President. I’ve seen the logo on products made in other regions too – Taiwan most notably. Let’s see how this one tastes!

The back of the package (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, boil the noodles for 3 minutes. In a bowl, put all the sachet contents except the fried onion. Drain the noodles and combine them with the ingredients in the bowl and sprinkle with the fried onion.

The noodle block.

The dry seasoning sachet.

A very fine powder.

Three connected liquid sachets (from left to right): seasoned oil, chilli sauce and sweet soy sauce.

Has an onion scent.

Chilli sauce on the left and sweet soy sauce on the right.

The garnish sachet.

Fried onion.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added sweet onion and chicken sauteed with BonCabe chilli spice, fried egg, Dua Belibus chilli sauce and kerupuk aci. The noodles have a good consistency and texture. They have a very standard instant noodle gauge. The flavor is sweet and salty with just a hint of spicy. It’s definitely more chicken than other mi goreng I’ve had. The fried onion ends up giving everything a nice little crunch. 4.5 out of 5.0 stars.UPC bar code 8992388312290.

Here’s a recipe for ayam kecap – sweet soy sauce chicken.