Tag Archives: tray

#3176: Maruchan Gotsumori Shio Yakisoba – Japan

#3151: Maruchan Gotsumori Shio Yakisoba - Japan

Here’s one from Japan Ramen Box – a subscription service out of Japan. Here’s what they have to say about this Maruchan variety –

‘A classic yakisoba dish featuring 130 grams of salted and
fried noodles! Cut with a round blade, these smooth, delicious
noodles are sure to delight your taste buds and fill your
stomach! In just three minutes you can enjoy rich yakisoba
noodles with a chicken base, salty sauces, and tasty spices.
The whole dish is brought together by the use of basil, onions,
garlic, spicy ground chili, and cabbages. ‘

Alright then – let’s delve into this neat box!

Maruchan Gotsumori Shio Yakisoba – Japan

#3151: Maruchan Gotsumori Shio Yakisoba - Japan

Detail of the bottom of the tray (click to enlarge). Probably contains pork and fish but check for yourself. To prepare, add boiling water and garnish sachet content to fill line and cover for 3 minutes. Drain. Add in sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#3151: Maruchan Gotsumori Shio Yakisoba - Japan

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#3151: Maruchan Gotsumori Shio Yakisoba - Japan

The noodle block.

#3151: Maruchan Gotsumori Shio Yakisoba - Japan

A dry sachet.

#3151: Maruchan Gotsumori Shio Yakisoba - Japan

A grainy powder.

#3151: Maruchan Gotsumori Shio Yakisoba - Japan

A dry garnish sachet.

#3151: Maruchan Gotsumori Shio Yakisoba - Japan

Cabbage.

#3151: Maruchan Gotsumori Shio Yakisoba - Japan

A wet sachet.

#3151: Maruchan Gotsumori Shio Yakisoba - Japan

Shio yakisoba sauce.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added baked chicken (seasoned with black pepper, garlic powder, and Nutek Salt for Life), spring onion, barbeque pork, Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, and habanero togarashi. The noodles came out quite nicely with a good quality and large quantity. The flavor was on pint – tasty as can be and logical. Crunchy pieces of cabbage. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.  JAN bar code 4901990335126.

#3151: Maruchan Gotsumori Shio Yakisoba - Japan

Maruchan Midori no Tanuki Tenpura Soba Japan Cup Noodles

https://www.theramenrater.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/2019_1_10_3151_012.jpg

Watch me cook on Instant Noodle Recipe Time!

#3075: Sapporo Ichiban Spicy Otafuku Okonomiyaki Sauce Yakisoba – Japan

#3075: Sapporo Ichiban Spicy Otafuku Okonomiyaki Sauce Yakisoba - Japan

Today we have a Zenpop.JP variety – so what’s Zenpop? They’re a subscription service for all things Japanese! Definitely, check them out. By the way, use coupon code RAMENRATER to get $2 off! Here’s what they had to say about this one – ‘Ripe jalapeno peppers are used to make the Yakisoba addictively spicy. Adding mayonnaise brings out the sour and savory taste of the okonomiyaki sauce. Even in this hot weather, the smell of the yakisoba will always intensify your appetite.’

I should note that although they reference mayonnaise in this one, this one doesn’t include it. Anyways, let’s check it out!

Sapporo Ichiban Spicy Otafuku Okonomiyaki Sauce Yakisoba – Japan

#3075: Sapporo Ichiban Spicy Otafuku Okonomiyaki Sauce Yakisoba - Japan

Detail from the bottom of the outer wraps (click to enlarge). Unsure if it contains meat – check for yourself. To prepare, add boiling water to fill line and cover for 3 minutes. Drain. Add in liquid base sachet. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#3075: Sapporo Ichiban Spicy Otafuku Okonomiyaki Sauce Yakisoba - Japan

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge). Note tab C pulls off to reveal a drain spout.

#3075: Sapporo Ichiban Spicy Otafuku Okonomiyaki Sauce Yakisoba - Japan

The noodle block.

#3075: Sapporo Ichiban Spicy Otafuku Okonomiyaki Sauce Yakisoba - Japan

Loose bits from the tray.

#3075: Sapporo Ichiban Spicy Otafuku Okonomiyaki Sauce Yakisoba - Japan

A wet sachet.

#3075: Sapporo Ichiban Spicy Otafuku Okonomiyaki Sauce Yakisoba - Japan

A dark sauce!

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, spring onion, chashu pork, and sriracha mayonnaise. The noodle came out fine – no problem there. Unfortunately, the japaneo flavor was a bit bitter and just kind of overrode the deliciousness of the wsy the original version was. Kind of bummed out. 2.0 out of 5.0 stars.   JAN bar code 4901734034612.

#3075: Sapporo Ichiban Spicy Otafuku Okonomiyaki Sauce Yakisoba - Japan

Sapporo 1ban Fried Noodles Otahuku Okonomi Sauce Taste 4.6oz 4pcs Japanese Instant Noodle Yakisoba Ninjapo

Watch me cook up this yakisoba on Instant Noodle Recipe Time!

#2906: Myojo Shoyu Sesame Chili Oil Yakisoba

#2756: Myojo Shoyu Sesame Chili Oil Yakisoba

Here’s a big tray of yakisoba I found up in Canada at Osaka Market in Yaohan Centre, Richmond, BC. Yeah, that’s a mouthful. Anyways, sometimes they’ll have a special on Japanese varieties that are somewhat new and this is one of them. Here’s a little about yakisoba from Wikipedia for you –

Yakisoba (焼きそば[jakiꜜsoba]), literally “fried buckwheat,” is a Japanese noodle stir-fry dish. Although soba means buckwheat, yakisoba noodles are actually made from wheat flour, and are typically flavored with a condiment similar to oyster sauce. The dish first appeared in food stalls in Japan during the early 20th century.[1]

Yakisoba is prepared by frying ramen-style wheat noodles with bite-sized pork, vegetables (usually cabbageonions or carrots) and flavored with yakisoba sauce, salt and pepper. It can be served with a variety of garnishes, such as aonori (seaweed powder), beni shoga (shredded pickled ginger), katsuobushi (fish flakes), and mayonnaise.

Yakisoba is most familiarly served on a plate either as a main dish or a side dish. Another popular way to prepare and serve yakisoba in Japan is to pile the noodles into a bun sliced down the middle in the style of a hot dog, and garnish the top with mayonnaise and shreds of pickled ginger. Called yakisoba-pan (pan meaning bread) it is commonly available at local festivals or konbini (convenience stores).

Sometimes, Japanese white Udon is used as a replacement of Chinese style Soba and called Yakiudon. This variation was started in Kitakyushu or Kokura in Fukuoka Prefecture.

In Okinawa, Yakisoba is popular with Okinawans and U.S. service members stationed on the island alike. After the 1945 hostilities ended on Okinawa, the US military command supplied American food products to the malnourished residents. The preferred Okinawan Yakisoba was prepared from spaghetti, spam, ketchup, any available vegetable (usually canned), and mayonnaise for frying. Mess halls and other on-base eateries often serve yakisoba. Chopped hotdogs are a popular addition to yakisoba made on Okinawa, in addition to other meats such as ham, chicken, and pork.

Alright – let’s give it a go.

Myojo Shoyu Sesame Chili Oil Yakisoba – Japan

#2756: Myojo Shoyu Sesame Chili Oil Yakisoba

The distributor/import stickler (click to enlarge).

#2756: Myojo Shoyu Sesame Chili Oil Yakisoba

Detail of the out wraps (click to enlarge). Contains pork and chicken. To prepare, add noodle block and solid ingredients sachet to tray and boiling water to fill line. Cover for 3 minutes. Drain using special lid. Add in liquid base and dry sachet and stir. Finally, ganish with mayonnaise and enjoy!

#2756: Myojo Shoyu Sesame Chili Oil Yakisoba

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2756: Myojo Shoyu Sesame Chili Oil Yakisoba

The noodle block.

#2756: Myojo Shoyu Sesame Chili Oil Yakisoba

A large liquid base sachet.

#2756: Myojo Shoyu Sesame Chili Oil Yakisoba

Yakisoba sauce.

#2756: Myojo Shoyu Sesame Chili Oil Yakisoba

A dry sachet.

#2756: Myojo Shoyu Sesame Chili Oil Yakisoba

Perhaps togarashi and chives?

#2756: Myojo Shoyu Sesame Chili Oil Yakisoba

Solid ingredients.

#2756: Myojo Shoyu Sesame Chili Oil Yakisoba

Chashu, narutomaki and spring onion.

#2756: Myojo Shoyu Sesame Chili Oil Yakisoba

Mayonnaise!

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion amd Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts. The noodles come out great – and plentiful. They indeed have a soy sauce and sesame kind of combo with a touch of heat. The mayo is great as it makes it nice and greasy. The large naruto slice and chashu are very nice, and bits of cabbage are throughout. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4902881419123.

#2756: Myojo Shoyu Sesame Chili Oil Yakisoba

MYOJO IPPEI-CHAN YOMISE Y A K I S O B A INSTANT NOODLE CASE [12pcs] by Myojo

Myojo commercials from 1977-1990

#2721: Yumei Instant Spicy Hot Pot

#2721: Yumei Instant Spicy Hot Pot - China

Alright kiddie, hold onto your butts! So we have something here I had to review the day after I got it; not because it was going to expire but because I was a little wary of storing it. Why’s that? Well, first off I got this up in Canada at Osaka Market at Yaohan Centre in Richmond, BC. I’d just returned from my trip to Taiwan, my jet lag now gone (for the most part). I had some leftover Taiwanese currency and the Kingmark Currency Exchange doesn’t charge for exchanging which is nice. I converted it so I could treat my family to some wheel cake and milk tea at a little Taiwanese shop at the centre.

I had NO INTENTION OF GETTING ANY NOODLES. PERIOD. I have so many noodles at this point and have to pare down my stock on hand as soon as possible because there’s more coming all the time! Well, we wandered into Osaka Market and their usual big display of fancy imports was replaced by Christmastime cookies and treats. We then hit the noodle aisle and I saw some things I didn’t have, but I held back. So far so good. Then my wife Kit spotted a couple things. One was a Yuzu Cup Noodle that was pretty cheap so went for that. The other was this strange bowl.

My first impression: it was heavy. The second was that I noticed something mentioning ‘self-cooking.’ So I thought this is unique so went for it. Let’s look inside and see what’s going on here.

Yumei Instant Spicy Hot Pot – China

#2721: Yumei Instant Spicy Hot Pot - China

First, let’s look at the English instructions (click to enlarge). Here we go:

CONSUME DIRECTION:

1. Open the box, remove the upper layer, tear off the sauce bag and chives bag, and pour them into the upper layer.
2. Tear off the vermicelli bag and vegetable bag, and put them into the upper layer, and stir and mix them together.
3. Add water into the upper layer, but not over the edge of the layer (hot water recommend for the better favor).
4. Open the self-heating package bag, and put the self-heating package into lower layer, add cold water until the self-heating package soaked totally.
5. Put the upper layer on the top, and cover the lid, wait 8 minutes or more and enjoy the hotpot.
CAUTION: THE HOT STEAMING AND PREVENT FROM BURNING HURT.

Okay – a couple interesting things here. I do want to avoid the burning hurt when at all possible. Another is that this has a self-heating package that works via a chemical reaction in the lower level of the packaging. Wow – so this stuff literally cooks itself. Fascinating!

#2721: Yumei Instant Spicy Hot Pot - China

Here’s the distribution/import sticker (click to enlarge). Note the numbers here – 72 calories and over 9000mg of sodium. Judging by the 46% RDA on this, I’m guessing it’s 915.6mg – that’s more logical. But only 72 calories for this thing? That seems a little suspect. But let’s continue on after noting the name of the distributor – JC Bunny Bunny!

#2721: Yumei Instant Spicy Hot Pot - China

The underside of the outer cardboard packaging (click to enlarge).

#2721: Yumei Instant Spicy Hot Pot - China

An included fork!

#2721: Yumei Instant Spicy Hot Pot - China

A napkin.

#2721: Yumei Instant Spicy Hot Pot - China

The package of vermicelli.

#2721: Yumei Instant Spicy Hot Pot - China

A large liquid base sachet.

#2721: Yumei Instant Spicy Hot Pot - China

A huge sachet of vegetables – fresh vegetables.

#2721: Yumei Instant Spicy Hot Pot - China

A sachet of chives.

#2721: Yumei Instant Spicy Hot Pot - China

This is the fascinating item – the heating bag. When cold water is introduced, it starts a chemical reaction which brings the heat – apparently enough to cook this product. I’m really very curious about this – never have I seen such a thing in an instant noodle before. What gets me though is that it recommends using cold water in the lower tray with this and hot water in the upper tray with the food. If you need hot water to make this, why not just cook it with the hot water you’ve already prepared? But hey, this will be fun.

Finished (click to enlarge). This was quite an experience. Definitely, watch the video where I cook this up. As for the vermicelli, it was cooked nicely. The broth was exceedingly spicy and just buzzing of Sichuan pepper. A little too much acidity going on for my taste. The vegetables did alright – all in all definitely a hot pot of noodles! 2.25 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 6952395703353.

#2721: Yumei Instant Spicy Hot Pot - China

Asian Hotpots: How to Cook Simple and Delicious Hot Pot Dishes at Home

Here’s me cooking this one up

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Alright – bring on the confusion, the shock and the WTF’s. Yes, mayonnaise is very popular as a topping in Japan. Why? Well, it’s freaking awesome – it’s tasty and works very well. Yakisoba without it is just not as good.

Speaking of mayonnaise, I once had the chance to partake in a contest with a friend many years ago. Two jars of mayonnaise, I believe 12 ounce, were purchased. The challenge was to see who could eat more in 10 minutes. I was on no problem; I had the title of Mayonnaise King for a long time. But he wanted to challenge me so I figured why the hell not. This was at a party and people were actually betting on who would win. The timer started and the eating began.

Mayonnaise is thick and oily stuff. The first big bite was no problem, however, the second was. Once the first goes down, the next wants to stick to it so it is a very slow process. I did win, but by a slim margin. I think where I won though was as this was a party we were having some beers and I chose a Coors – very bubbly. This broke down the funk I had in my mouth from the mayo and I was back in action quickly. My opponent, however, sat on a couch, whining and moaning for much of the evening.

Here’s a little from Wikipedia about Japanese mayonnaise –

Japanese mayonnaise is typically made with apple cider vinegar or rice vinegar and a small amount of MSG, which gives it a different flavor from mayonnaise made from distilled vinegar.[39][page needed][40] It is most often sold in soft plastic squeeze bottles. Its texture is thicker than most Western commercial mayonnaise in part because only egg yolks and not the entire egg is used when making it.[41]

Apart from salads, it is popular with dishes such as okonomiyakitakoyaki and yakisoba and may also accompany katsu and karaage.[42]

Kewpie (Q.P.) is the most popular brand of Japanese mayonnaise,[43] advertised with a Kewpie doll logo. The vinegar is a proprietary blend containing apple and malt vinegars.[44] The Kewpie company was started in 1925 by Tochiro Nakashima, his goal was to create a condiment that made eating vegetables more enjoyable.[45]

So yeah – mayonnaise is great in yakisoba. I will say right here that I absolutely despise and wretch at the thought of Miracle Whip, so don’t even consider using it on yakisona. Let’s check this one out.

Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise – Japan

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The distribution sticker (click to enlarge). I wish they were better with the names of these products on these labels…

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Here’s detail of the outer wraps (click to enlarge). Unsure whether or not it contains meat. To prepare, open tab 1 to line 2. Take out sachets. Add in boiling water to line and close for 3~4 minutes. Open tab 3 and use to drain. Remove lid. add in powder sachet and combine. Finally, add mayonnaise sachet contents and enjoy!

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The noodle block.

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Loose garnish from inside the tray.

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

A powder sachet.

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The flavoring base.

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The mayonnaise sachet!

Finished (click to enlarge). The noodles are on the dry side although they pull in the yakisoba powder nicely. The powder coats everything and has a very authentic taste to it. The included garnish is great – I especially love the crunchy cabbage. Finally, the mayonnaise has a little kick to it and just brings it all home. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4902105226797.

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Nissin UFO, Instant Japanese Sosu Yakisoba(Pan-fried Noodles), 4.5oz(129g) x 6pcs (For 6 servings)[Japan Import] (get it here)

A great TV spot for Nissin’s U.F.O.

#2640: Myojo Hyobanya Yakisoba

#2734: Myojo Hyobanya Yakisoba - Japan

Here’s one I got up in Canada in 2017. It’s pretty awesome – a quick drive and we’re in another country! Some might say ‘that’s Canada – it’s not so different.’ Well, it is. It’s full of nice people and interesting things. I like it.

So this one looks great. Yakisoba is one of my favorite Japanese dishes and it should be noted that I found a less annoying way of scanning the outer wraps. You see, trays of yakisoba usually have a plastic wrap around them, and photographing the bottom and sides and piecing it together doesn’t work so well. I’ve figured out the best way after multiple times of trying to scan it up. So hopefully you’ll click to enlarge on that pic below here. I spend a lot of time on getting these to look good. So yeah. Let’s check this one out!

Myojo Hyobanya Yakisoba – Japan

#2734: Myojo Hyobanya Yakisoba - Japan

The import/distributor sticker (click to enlarge).

#2734: Myojo Hyobanya Yakisoba - Japan

Detail of the outer wraps (click to enlarge). I believe this contains pork. To prepare, take all sachets out and add boiling water to line. Cover for 5 minutes. Use drain spout and drain. Add in sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2734: Myojo Hyobanya Yakisoba - Japan

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2734: Myojo Hyobanya Yakisoba - Japan

The noodle block.

#2734: Myojo Hyobanya Yakisoba - Japan

Loose bits from the package.

#2734: Myojo Hyobanya Yakisoba - Japan

A liquid base sachet.

#2734: Myojo Hyobanya Yakisoba - Japan

Yakisoba sauce.

#2734: Myojo Hyobanya Yakisoba - Japan

A small sachet.

#2734: Myojo Hyobanya Yakisoba - Japan

Powdered seaweed, aka green laver.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion and Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts. The noodles were on the fluffy side, which is alright but kind of not alright at the same time. I would have liked a tad more chewiness. The flavor is your standard yakisoba taste. The inclusion of scads of cabbage is very nice and the fresh crunch it brings is extremely welcome. 3.75 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4902881426343.

#2734: Myojo Hyobanya Yakisoba - Japan

Myojo Hyoban-ya source y a k i s o b a 114g ~ 12 pieces

I’m unusre but I think this guy does a periodic run-down of the new instant ramen in Japan

#2542: Acecook Super Cup Yochan Ika Yakisoba

#2542: Acecook Super Cup Yochan Ika Yakisoba - Japan - squid - The Ramen Rater

My wife and I have been trying out something new. We trade cooking for the week. I make all the dinners one week, she the next. It’s actually been a lot of fun – some positives (I have learned how to make some pretty awesome yakisoba in the kitchen) and some fails (red curry slow cooked in a crock pot really isn’t the way to go when the beef  released a thick sheen of greasy fat). Nothing better than to make something your significant other really enjoys!

I’ve been asked in the past if I’m a chef which makes me laugh. I make instant noodles and add garnish to them – That definitely doesn’t vault me into the world of top chef, rather into the world of being resourceful and finding where to find logical ingredients for garnish and knowing how to prepare them. I just know what I like – that’s where the stars come in. Anyways, this looks to be a squid yakisoba – here’s a little about yakisoba from Wikipedia –

Yakisoba (焼きそば?), literally “fried buckwheat,” or sōsu yakisoba (ソース焼きそば?) (the same, but in sauce). It first appeared in food stalls in Japan during the early 20th century.[1] Although soba means buckwheat, typically suggesting noodles made from that flour in mainland Japan, yakisoba noodles are made from wheat flour. It is typically flavored with a condiment similar to oyster sauce.

It is prepared by frying ramen-style noodles with bite-sized pork, vegetables (usually cabbage, onions or carrots) and flavored with yakisoba sauce, salt and pepper. It is served with a multitude of garnishes, such as aonori (seaweed powder), beni shoga (shredded pickled ginger), katsuobushi (fish flakes), and mayonnaise.

Yakisoba is most familiarly served on a plate either as a main dish or a side dish. Another popular way to prepare and serve yakisoba in Japan is to pile the noodles into a bun sliced down the middle in the style of a hot dog, and garnish the top with mayonnaise and shreds of pickled ginger. Called yakisoba-pan, pan meaning bread, it is commonly available at local festivals or konbini (convenience stores).

Sometimes, Japanese white Udon is used as a replacement of Chinese style Soba and called Yakiudon. This variation was started in Kitakyushu or Kokura in Fukuoka Prefecture.

In Okinawa, Yakisoba is popular with Okinawans and U.S. service members stationed on the island alike. After the 1945 hostilities ended on Okinawa, the US military command supplied American food products to the malnourished residents. The preferred Okinawan Yakisoba was prepared from spaghetti, spam, ketchup, any available vegetable (usually canned), and mayonnaise for frying. Mess halls and other on-base eateries often serve yakisoba. Chopped hotdogs are a popular addition to yakisoba made on Okinawa, in addition to other meats such as ham, chicken, and pork.

Had no idea about the hot dogs! Interesting! I should mention – yes, I know this isn’t a cup, but from everything I’ve read, this range is called Super Cup. Alright – let’s have a look at this Acecook Super Cup yakisoba.

Acecook Super Cup Yochan Ika Yakisoba – Japan

#2542: Acecook Super Cup Yochan Ika Yakisoba - Japan - squid - The Ramen Rater

The distributor/import sticker (click to enlarge).

#2542: Acecook Super Cup Yochan Ika Yakisoba - Japan - squid - The Ramen Rater

Detail of the underside of the outer plastic wrap (click to enlarge). To prepare, peel back tab A to line B. Add contents of garnish sachet and boiling water to fill line. Cover for 3 minutes. Peel off tab C to expose drain spout and drain off water. Remove lid completely and add dry and liquid base sachets. Stir and enjoy!

#2542: Acecook Super Cup Yochan Ika Yakisoba - Japan - squid - The Ramen Rater

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2542: Acecook Super Cup Yochan Ika Yakisoba - Japan - squid - The Ramen Rater

The noodle block.

#2542: Acecook Super Cup Yochan Ika Yakisoba - Japan - squid - The Ramen Rater

A dry base sachet.

#2542: Acecook Super Cup Yochan Ika Yakisoba - Japan - squid - The Ramen Rater

Has a sweet scent.

#2542: Acecook Super Cup Yochan Ika Yakisoba - Japan - squid - The Ramen Rater

A liquid base sachet.

#2542: Acecook Super Cup Yochan Ika Yakisoba - Japan - squid - The Ramen Rater

A very dark liquid.

#2542: Acecook Super Cup Yochan Ika Yakisoba - Japan - squid - The Ramen Rater

The garnish sachet.

#2542: Acecook Super Cup Yochan Ika Yakisoba - Japan - squid - The Ramen Rater

Guessing some of this is squid.

 

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, shichimi togarashi, spring onion and Kewpie mayo. The noodles are good – and very plentiful. However, the flavor is like a very acrid punch with a kind of yakisoba sauce back to it and it just doesn’t make me very enthusiastic about eating. The included garnish hydrated well and I did enjoy the bit of squid. Unfortunately, I’m experiencing disappointment. 1.5 out of 5.0 stars.  JAN bar code 4901071207342.

#2542: Acecook Super Cup Yochan Ika Yakisoba - Japan - squid - The Ramen Rater

Acecook Ika Big Noodle, Instant Source Yakisoba with Squid, Pack of 12

An Acecook TV spot

Unboxing Time With The Ramen Rater: Zenpop Summer Fresh Ramen Box

Unboxing With The Ramen Rater: Zenpop Summer Fresh Ramen Box

So Zenpop.jp has sent me another box and I thought I ought to do a video. They asked about this last time and so I figured I’d go ahead and do it. I think if, at all possible, I’m going to do this whenever I get a box from now on – kind of fun to crack these boxes open and see what’s inside! These will be called ‘Unboxing Time With The Ramen Rater.’So let’s check out this box from the noodle box purveyor! I should note that they also do other boxes – stationary for example among other things.

Zenpop Summer Fresh Ramen Box – Japan

Here’s a video of the unboxing – enjoy!

#2302: Nissin Yakisoba Instant Noodles

#2302: Nissin Yakisoba - Japan - The Ramen Rater

It’s kind of interesting. Indeed, I review two products a day but generally only post one. This ensures two things. First, I get to everything before it expires. Second, I have a buffer in case I don’t have time to do a review. Meanwhile, the buffer has grown and is quickly reaching 80 reviews! I did this review on November 13th, 2016 and today is Inauguration Day, January 20th, 2017. It’s kind of funny; I did this review about as many days before my daughter Miriam was born as days since she was born (December 17th). Another interesting thing is while unplanned, this review follows Momofuku Ando Day yesterday where I did a video about Nissin Yakisoba. Weird. Finally Happy Birthday to my sister Sue!

I reviewed this Nissin Yakisoba so many years ago that I think it deserves a new number today. Why? Well, back then it had a mayonnaise and mustard pack which is not present here; kind of a bummer since it went so well. But hey – I have a feeling this will be good. I thought I’d review this one today as my wife Kit really likes yakisoba and I’m about to go on a big trip to Taiwan tonight. Going to be gone for five days. This will be the longest I’ve been away from my son Miles since he was born – going to miss them both so much! I should mention that this review will be coming out long after I’ve returned – its November 13th right now and I wouldn’t be surprised if this doesn’t come out until around New Year’s Eve. Anyways, what’s yakisoba? Let’s ask wikipedia –

Yakisoba (焼きそば?), literally “fried buckwheat,” or sōsu yakisoba (ソース焼きそば?) (the same, but in sauce), is considered a Japanese dish but may have originated in Japan as a variant of fried noodles. It first appeared in food stalls in Japan during the early 20th century.[1] Although soba means buckwheat, typically suggesting noodles made from that flour in mainland Japan, yakisoba noodles are made from wheat flour. It is typically flavored with a condiment similar to oyster sauce. Prepared by frying ramen-style noodles with bite-sized pork, vegetables (usually cabbage, onions or carrots) and flavored with yakisoba sauce, salt and pepper. It is served with a multitude of garnishes, such as aonori(seaweed powder), beni shoga (shredded pickled ginger), katsuobushi (fish flakes), and mayonnaise.

Let’s check it out!

#2302: Nissin Yakisoba – Japan

#2302: Nissin Yakisoba - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Detail from the bottom and sides of the cellophane outer wraps (click to enlarge).

#2302: Nissin Yakisoba - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge). Probably contains fish. To prepare, open tab 1 to line 2 and take out sachets. Add boiling water to line and close for 3 minutes. Next, remove tab 3 to expose drain spout and drain. Finally, add in contents of sachets. Stir and enjoy!

#2302: Nissin Yakisoba - Japan - The Ramen Rater

The noodle block.

#2302: Nissin Yakisoba - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Bits from under the noodle block – primarily cabbage.

#2302: Nissin Yakisoba - Japan - The Ramen Rater

A dry base sachet.

#2302: Nissin Yakisoba - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Smells like yakisoba sauce!

#2302: Nissin Yakisoba - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Another dry sachet.

#2302: Nissin Yakisoba - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Looks like shichimi togarashi.

#2302: Nissin Yakisoba - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Finished (click to enlarge). Added beef and mayonnaise (put mayonnaise in a sandwich bag in one end then poke holes with a toothpick in one side on the other end and squirt) and beef. The noodles came out well – a little thinner than expected. Indeed, the quantity is serious here – only for those with a serious appetite! The yakisoba flavor is a little lighter than expected but it’s very good – not overdone. The cabbage is nice and crunchy and the sprinkle of togarashi is a plus. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4902105226780.

#2302: Nissin Yakisoba - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Nisshin source yakisoba cup mustard mayonnaise 108g ~ 12 pieces

A video from the Sixth Annual Momofuku Ando Day of me preparing Nissin Yakisoba.

#2158: A-Sha Chow Mein Original Flavor

Here’s another one of the newer A-Sha tray designs. This one’s original flavor, which is kind of a soy sauce flavor I believe. Let’s check it out!

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add noodle block and vegetable sachet contents to tray. Fill to line with water. Microwave uncovered for 4 minutes at 800W (for different wattage microwaves, use this handy tool). Put lid on and use spout to drain off excess water. Add in liquid sachet contents. Stir and enjoy!

Here’s the tray underneath the cardboard outer.

The bag of noodles.

Detail of the back of the package (click to enlarge).

The noodle block.

The vegetables sachet.

A nice little mixture.

A liquid sachet.

Kind of a slightly thick soy sauce.

Finished (click to enlarge). The noodles came out extremely well – beautiful gauge and texture. Again, these are the noodles that when I first tried them cooked I considered to be ‘masterful in their simplicity,’ using very few ingredients and delivering a fine chew and mouthfeel. They don’t disappoint here whatsoever. As for the flavoring, it’s a salty soy which coats everything well. The vegetables are a very nice addition to this product. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 4715635852943.

A-Sha Chow Mein – Original Sauce

A video clip with news coverage about A-Sha Dry Noodle of Taiwan.

#2156: A-Sha Chow Mein Oyster Sauce BBQ Flavor

The next edition of The Ramen Rater’s top Ten Taiwanese Instant Noodles Of All Time will be coming out in about a month, and so I’ll be cramming in as many late ones to arrive as possible. Today, one of a trifecta by A-Sha Dry Noodles – microwavable trays! Definitely something I’ve not seem out of Taiwan before that I can think of. Anyways, let’s give it a whirl in the ol’ microwave!

Here’s the back of the cardboard outer (click to enlarge). Contains shrimp. To prepare, add noodle block and vegetable sachet contents to tray. Fill to line with water. Microwave uncovered for 4 minutes at 800W (for different wattage microwaves, use this handy tool). Put lid on and use spout to drain off excess water. Add in liquid sachet contents. Stir and enjoy!

Here’s the tray, unopened as seen under the cardboard outer.

A noodle block.

The back of the included noodle package (click to enlarge).

The noodle block.

The vegetables sachet.

A nice selection.

The liquid sachet.

Has a sweet scent.

Finished (click to enlarge). The noodles came out a little on the al dente side but were still quite good. the issue I had with this was the profoundly salty nature of the flavoring. It was just too much and just didn’t work right here; kind of like the sauce was at adds with the noodle. The vegetables did well. 2.25 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 4715635852936.

A-Sha Chow Mein – Oyster Sauce (Hoisin)

An A-Sha Dry Noodle promotional video.

#2061: Kamfen Dried-mix Noodles Scallop Seafood Flavoured

Here’s one I picked up at 99 Ranch Market a couple months ago. I have a couple brands that I have as ‘reserves’ – if I run low on instant noodles, I know certain stores have always had certain varieties and I can get them at any time. This is one of them. At that point I was running low (although now I’m not). Let’s crack this tray open and give it a try!

The distributor/import stickers (click to enlarge).

From the bottom of the package (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself.

A card with preparation details (click to enlarge). To prepare, add in vegetable sachet and 500ml boiling water. Cover and let stand for 3 minutes. Use cover drain spout to draiun off excess water. Add in liquid sachet and stir well. Enjoy!

An included fork!

The noodle block.

The liquid sachet.

Thick and dark.

The vegetables sachet.

A nice mixture.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added shrimp and carved squid. The noodles are broad and flat with a very light chew to them. The sauce covers well and gives a nice sweet and salty seafood flavor throughout. The included vegetables were more than ample and really made this one feel premium. 4.25 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 6920363402218.

Instant Noodle Wonton (Beef Flavor) – 82g

A video about travelling to Shenzhen, China – where this product is produced.