Tag Archives: shin ramyun black

#3030: Nongshim Shin Black Spicy Rich Bone Broth Flavor – South Korea

#3030: Nongshim Shin Black Spicy Rich Bone Broth Flavor - South Korea

Here’s one I found at the new T&T Supermarket in Lansdowne Center up in Richmond, BC. A Shin Black bowl! I knew they must exist; I mean, there’s generally a pack, cup and bowl for everything that comes out of South Korea. Well, here it is. What’s interesting is that this isn’t available in the United States, and up in Canada it’s not a product of the Nongshim China factory, which most bowls up there seem to be.

I don’t know if I’ve seen it referred to as ‘spicy rich bone broth flavor’ either, but as ‘spicy pot au feu’ in the past. Also something interesting to note is that this one’s microwavable. Anyways a neat find and sounds like something neat to try today. Let’s get started.

Nongshim Shin Black Bowl – South Korea

#3030: Nongshim Shin Black Spicy Rich Bone Broth Flavor - South Korea

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains beef, pork, shrimp and fish. To prepare, remove lid and add in sachet contents. Fill to line with room temperature water. Microwave (1000W) for 4 minutes. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#3030: Nongshim Shin Black Spicy Rich Bone Broth Flavor - South Korea

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#3030: Nongshim Shin Black Spicy Rich Bone Broth Flavor - South Korea

The noodle block.

#3030: Nongshim Shin Black Spicy Rich Bone Broth Flavor - South Korea

Loose bits from inside the cup.

#3030: Nongshim Shin Black Spicy Rich Bone Broth Flavor - South Korea

A soup base sachet.

#3030: Nongshim Shin Black Spicy Rich Bone Broth Flavor - South Korea

A spicy scented powder.

#3030: Nongshim Shin Black Spicy Rich Bone Broth Flavor - South Korea

Another dry sachet.

#3030: Nongshim Shin Black Spicy Rich Bone Broth Flavor - South Korea

A light powder.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Chinese sausage, scallion and Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts. Noodles hydrated well and had a great texture to them from the microwave. Broth had that standard Shin Black flavor – no surprises here. Tasty! 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.  UPC bar code 031146042517.

#3030: Nongshim Shin Black Spicy Rich Bone Broth Flavor - South Korea

NongShim S h i n   B l a c k  Noodle Soup, Spicy, 2.64 OZ (Pack of 6)

Watch me cook this one up on an episode of Instant Noodle Recipe Time!

The Ramen Rater’s Top Ten South Korean Instant Noodles Of All Time 2018 Edition

UPDATE: Here’s the new 2019 List!

Top Ten South Korean Instant Noodles

Kicking off Top Ten List season, I bring you the South Korean Top Ten Instant Noodles Of All Time for 2018. I looked at how many varieties from South Korea I’ve reviewed to date and got 326 so far. South Korean varieties continue to evolve and innovate in different ways in order to satisfy the changing needs and tastes of the consumer – definitely keeps things interesting. As always, I ask any companies, whether in South Korea or elsewhere – that would like me to review their products to send me an email! I am happy to talk to you!  Without further delay, let’s have a look at the Top Ten South Korean Instant Noodles list for 2018 – the best South Korean varieties available out of the over 360 South Korean varieties from the over 2,500 varieties of instant noodles I’ve reviewed thus far.

The Ramen Rater’s Top Ten South Korean Instant Noodle Of All Time 2018 Edition

Video Presentation

A video presentation of the Top Ten South Korean Instant Noodles Of All Time 2018 Edition.

The Ramen Rater’s Top Ten South Korean Instant Noodle Of All Time 2018 Edition

#10: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black

#10: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black

When Shin Ramyun Black came onto the scene a few years back it was a huge hit and still is. An upgraded version of their popular shin Ramyun, it includes a sachet of Sul-Long-Tang soup base which gives an extra heartiness to the broth. Thick ramyun noodles and a spicy bite round out the scene. It took me some time to get a pack made in South Korea, a requirement of this this. Original review

#9: Paldo Cheese Noodle

#9: Paldo Cheese Noodle

Paldo’s Cheese Noodle has been on the list for awhile now and with good reason. The way the cheese intermingles with the red spicy broth is amazingly good. The noodles are nice and thick ramyun and there’s a large quantity of them. Definitely one that everyone should try – and now there’s a spicier version on the market. Original review

#8: Nongshim Champong Noodle Soup Spicy Seafood Flavor

#8: Nongshim Champong Noodle Soup Spicy Seafood Flavor

Nongshim Champong is a spicy seafood noodle soup. It combines what you are used to with the beefiness of a standard Korean ramyun but replaces the beef with seafood flavor. This more ‘of the sea’ variety works very well with the chewy ramyun noodle. It’s kind of like a seafood stew to be honest.  Excellent when paired with seafood. Original review

#7: Nongshim Neoguri Stir-fry Noodles Spicy Seafood

#7: Nongshim Neoguri Stir-fry Noodles Spicy Seafood

New to the market is Nongshim’s Neoguri Stir-Fry Noodles. Neoguri Spicy Seafood Soup is a long time favorite of many and now it’s been converted in this new version as a dry noodle, sans broth. To be honest, I like this much better – not only does it have the great flavor of Neoguri, it’s got a plethora of garnish included – featuring little pieces of fishcake with the raccoon mascot on them. Original review

#6: Paldo Rabokki Noodle

#6: Paldo Rabokki Noodle

To understand Paldo’s Rabokki Noodle, you have to understand tteokbokki. It’s also spelled topokki – but however you spell it, tteokbokki are thick cylindrical rice tubes that have a nice chewiness to them. They’re often paired with a thick red sauce which is spicy as well as sweet and served with fishcake, egg and other garnish. These noodles are paired with the sauce in a very tasty representation and crossover of the dish. Original review

#5: Nongshin Chal Bibim Myun

#5: Nongshin Chal Bibim Myun

Nongshim’s Chal Bibim Myun is a cold noodle which is great anytime, but especially during the summer months. A kind of sweet and spicy sauce coats the noodles and is also refreshing at the same time. Pairs very well with fresh cucumber and hard boiled egg. Original review

#4: Ottogi Jin Jjambbong Spicy Seafood Ramyun

#4: Ottogi Jin Jjambbong Spicy Seafood Ramyun

Ottogi’s Jin series added a couple of new varieties recently, and this is my favorite of the two. During a recent trip to Taipei, I went to a restaurant called Love Instant Noodles where they doll up packs of instant noodles and serve them piping hot. This is the one I chose from their selection. Jjambbong is a kind of spicy stew and this one has a nice kind of grilled flavor to it, alongside the popular broader ramyun currently spreading around  – great stuff! Original review

#3: Paldo Budae Jjigae

#3: Paldo Budae Jjigae

Here we have last year’s #1 on this list and it is also on the annual The Ramen Rater’s Top Ten Instant Noodles Of All Time 2017 annual list. So, what’s Budae Jjigae? Well, take donated rations from US soldiers from the Korean War and mix them with the local South Korean cuisine. This interesting fusion works so well including tastes from both cultures. Original review

#2: Ottogi Budae Jjigae Ramen

#2: Ottogi Budae Jjigae Ramen

Ottogi also has a Budae Jjigae – and it’s my favorite of the varieties to spring onto the market in the last couple years. With bits of processed meats and other niceties, it combines with South Korean flavors into a crescendo of tasty goodness. Budae Jjigae translates to ‘troop stew’ or army stew’ as it originated from donated rations from US forces during the Korean War. Original review

#1: Samyang Foods Paegaejang Ramen

#1: Samyang Foods Paegaejang Ramen

The number one this is year is Samyang Foods Pagaejang. This is a very tasty beef noodle with strong flavor – a hearty broth and rich taste. The noodles are just perfect for me – a nice light outer edge and chewier insides. Definitely one to try and I hope it comes to the United States for all here to sample. Original review

#2533: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black (SK Version)

#2533: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black (SK Version) - South Korea - The Ramen Rater

So for a long time, I’ve wanted to review the South Korean version of Shin Ramyun Black, and I know lots of people have wanted me to. Here in the United States, we have Nongshim America (NSA) in Rancho Cucamonga. Anywhere you find Shin Ramyun Black in the United States, it originates in California. However, Nonshim Korea (NSK) is its origin. You can thank Anders and his girlfriend Ji-Min from South Korea for sending this along! Thanks again! Here’s a little something about the Shin from Wikipedia –

Shin Ramyun/Ramyeon is a brand of instant noodle (including cup ramyeon) that is produced by a South Korean food company Nongshim since October, 1986. It is now exported to over 100 countries, and is the highest selling instant noodle brand in South Korea.

Shin Ramyun is well known for its spicy flavor. It is produced in two kinds: Shin Ramyun,[1] the original one, and Shin Ramyun Black,[2] which was introduced in 2011. A standard package of Shin Ramyun consists of noodles, a sachet of flavoring powder (soup base), and a sachet of vegetable flakes. Shin Ramyun Black contains extra beef stock soup.

Shin Ramyun was introduced in October 1986 by Nongshim. The Nongshim R&D team came up with the idea of Sogogijanguk, a Cabbage and Beef Stew, which is one of the most popular traditional South Korean dishes.[3]

After Shin Ramyun was introduced, Nongshim’s market share hit 46.3% in 1987, and exceeded 50% for the first time in 1988 (53.8%).[4] With the market share of over 20% just by itself, Shin Ramyun is a leading brand of the instant noodles in Korea.

In 2015, Shin Ramyun has achieved 28 billion units sold since it was first introduced.[5] Shin Ramyun is listed on the National Brand Consumption Index (NBCI)[6] as the number 1 brand in South Korea (2012~2016) for its brand awareness and brand power.[7]

The name of Shin Ramyun is from a Chinese character Shin (), which means “spicy.” Shin Ramyun uses red and black packaging with the emphasized calligraphic word “辛”.[3] The meaning of the Chinese character is shown on the background of the package. Nongshim decided to emphasize the Chinese character Shin (辛) for their brand with a belief that a single Chinese character delivers the brand image better than written in Korean. Additionally, the character is the surname of both the founder of Nongshim and his elder brother, who started Lotte.

Ok bam there’s a little snippet of info. Indeed, Shin Ramyun is quite a phenomenon in the instant noodle world. Let’s check out it’s new companion, Shin Ramyun Black.

Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black – South Korea

#2533: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black (SK Version) - South Korea - The Ramen Rater

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). I think this contains beef. To prepare, add everything into a pot with 550ml boiling water and cook for 4 1/2 minutes. Finall,y stir and enjoy!

#2533: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black (SK Version) - South Korea - The Ramen Rater

The round noodle block.

#2533: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black (SK Version) - South Korea - The Ramen Rater

The powder base.

#2533: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black (SK Version) - South Korea - The Ramen Rater

A lot of powder here.

#2533: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black (SK Version) - South Korea - The Ramen Rater

The sul-long tang powder.

#2533: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black (SK Version) - South Korea - The Ramen Rater

Light and powdery with a pleasant scent.

#2533: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black (SK Version) - South Korea - The Ramen Rater

The vegetables sachet.

#2533: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black (SK Version) - South Korea - The Ramen Rater

A groovy mixture.

#2533: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black (SK Version) - South Korea - The Ramen Rater

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, stewed beef and egg. The noodles hydrated very nicely – good thickness and chew – excellent ramyun. The broth is quite good. You have the spicy side and the smooth side – kind of creamy Shin Ramyun with garlic; more savory. The vegetables they include hydrate well. Very good! 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code

#2533: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black (SK Version) - South Korea - The Ramen Rater

Original Korea Nongshim Shin Black Noodle Soup (Pack of 4)

A timely Shin Ramyun TV spot

The Ramen Rater Reviews The Red Robin ‘Red Ramen Burger’

We were out doing grocery shopping and thought ‘hey there’s that Red Robin over there – wonder if they have those Red Ramen Burgers.’ Well, after a quick phone call to make sure they did, we swooped in to give them a try.

On the door (click to enlarge) we immediately saw some advertising for it. Kind of funny; the cat is clutching a bottle of ‘That’s Not Your Father’s Ginger Ale’ (I tried the root beer version which gave me a horrible gut ache) and nowhere did I see any mention of ordering this product anywhere.

At the table.

So it’s $12.49 – a little on the high end.

However if it were one of our birthdays, we could have gotten one for free!

Ready.

Ready.

Miles decided to sleep through the whole thing – he was out seconds after this.

Here is the one I got (click to enlarge).

A side shot of the burger (click to enlarge).

Let the investigation begin…

Well, there were some problems with this burger I found from the outset. They didn’t fry the bun long enough as it completely fell apart rather quickly. After about 3 bites, I ended up using a fork and eating it off the little plastic tray. The ‘seasoned bun’ really didn’t seem altogether seasoned at all to me; in fact, it just seemed bland. The burger itself was alright, but the aioli of onion, carrot and cabbage was like coleslaw and was just not right. Neither of us detected the presence of any basil really. Honestly, I wouldn’t bother with this overpriced burger. If I were to make a suggestion, do it like they did originally in Japan – use chashu pork! Maybe some tonkatsu sauce! In fact, I know that a short walk away from the Red Robin we visited in Katsu Burger, and last time we were there they had mentioned offering a ramen burger soon using breaded pork and tonkatsu sauce with a ramen bun.

Kit’s ramen burger (click to enlarge) was a little different. As you can see, the bun definitely seems a little darker.

Here’s a side shot. Hers stayed cohesive and I could definitely hear a lot more crunch to it when she took a bite. She had the same complaints about the aioli as well; she thought it was teriyaki sauce on coleslaw. They offered to serve it with or without jalapenos at the beginning which we both declined at the start. Jalapenos would have definitely overwhelmed all the flavor of the teriyaki, that’s for sure. I think we both agreed – the Red Ramen Burger gets about a 2 out of 5 stars – not extremely fun at all. A better idea is to make your own! Here’s the recipe I came up with using Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black South Korean instant noodles – in fact, you use everything from it and come out with fries and dipping sauce as well! Check it out!

The Ramen Rater’s Shin Ramyun Black Burger

  • 1 Package Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black
  • ground beef
  • 1 egg
  • 2 slices processed cheese
  • frozen french fries
  • cooking spray
  • ketchup and mayonnaise

The noodle block. This is where our buns come from.

In this recipe, everything in the package is used. I’ve seen so many recipes for ramen burgers where the flavorings are discarded. Why waste?

Step 1: Boil a pot of water. Add the noodle block and cook for 4 minutes. Drain well. Return to pot and crack egg into it – combine with noodles. Split noodle/egg mixture into two bowls. I used one with a rounded bottom for the bun and one with a flat bottom for the lower bun (actually, the top part of a bun is called the ‘crown’ and the bottom the ‘heel!) Press the noodles down a little and then put in the fridge for a couple hours to set.

Here are the crown and heel all done and out of their bowls.

Step 2: Spray pan and cook both sides of your buns until done as you like. A nice crispness is really enjoyable, but burnt isn’t so great so just keep and eye on them and don’t flip too much – they are a little delicate.

Step 3: For the fries – use a little cooking spray on them and sprinkle liberally with the gold Sul-Long-Tang powder packet and cook.

Step 4: Empty the contents of the green package into a little bowl and add some hot water. Let sit for a minute or so which lets the veggies and other bits hydrate. Drain.

Step 5: Add ketchup and mayonnaise – I used a little more mayo than ketchup – and combin3. This will be the fry sauce as well as the sauce for the burger.

Step 6: For the patty, add the entire red packet to the ground beef and combine well. Form into a patty and cook. Put the buns and burger together – add processed cheese and sauce.

Voila! Click image to enlarge). This came out really nice – the burger has a really great flavor from the red packet. I think you could switch it as well – use the red packet on the fried and the gold packet with the beef. Either way, this was really good – I hope you try it and let me know how it goes!

 

#1678: Nongshim Shin Black Spicy Pot-Au-Feu Flavor (New Edition)

It’s been a long time since I’ve reviewed Nongshim Shin Black – and it’s gotten a packaging facelift. This is made here in the USA in Rancho Cucamonga, California! This is the ‘flagship’ of their new line of ‘Black Class Noodle Soup’ varieties. This one’s got neww clothes – but is it still the same underneath? Let’s have a look at this dressed up pack of Nongshim Shin Black noodles!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Contains  beef. To prepare, boil 550ml water and add contents of package. Cook 4-5 minutes (I’ll be doing 4.5 minutes), stirring occasionally. Enjoy!

The noodle block.

The spicy soup base sachet.

Has a spicy scent.

A sul-long-tang soup base sachet.

Has a very nice garlic and beef scent.

The vegetables sachet/.

A nice mix!

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added beef, egg, spring onion and mung bean sprouts. The noodles are thick and chewy as ramyun always should be. There'[s a lot of them and they are very good. The broth is a strong beef and garlic affair with a good hit of spiciness to it. What I really liked are the vegetables – mushrooms are present as well as a ton of sliced garlic – which hydrates to a crisp fresh pinnacle of yumminess. A great bowl of ramyun! 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 031146013524.

Nongshim Shin Black Noodle Soup, 4.58 Ounce Packages (Pack of 18)

A TV spot for Nongshim Shin Black.

#1178: Nongshim Shin Black Spicy Pot-au-feu Flavor Premium Noodle Soup

You might be thinking, ‘hey – didn’t he already review this?’ Nope – I reviewed the Shin Ramyun Black cup from South Korea. This is the one that is manufactured here in the United States in Rancho Cucamonga, California.So what is this ‘Pot-au-feu’ flavor? I consulted Wikipedia and found this:

Pot-au-feu (French pronunciation: ​[pɔ.to.fø] “pot on the fire”) is a French beef stew. According to chefRaymond Blanc, pot-au-feu is “the quintessence of French family cuisine, it is the most celebrated dish in France. It honours the tables of the rich and poor alike.”[1]

The cuts of beef and the vegetables involved vary, but a typical pot-au-feu contains:

Cooking cartilaginous meat in the stew will result in gelatin being dissolved into the broth. If the stew is allowed to cool, the broth may turn into a jelly, resulting in an interesting texture. Allowing the stew to cool also allows the removal of excess fat, which floats on the surface and solidifies.

The dish is often served with coarse salt and strong Dijonmustard, and sometimes also with gherkins pickled in vinegar.

Pot-au-feu broth may be used as a soup (often enriched with rice, pasta or toasted bread), as a base for sauces, or for cooking vegetables or pasta. Ready-to-use concentrated cubes are available to make what purports to be pot-au-feu broth when water is added.

Pot-au-feu could be a continuous affair in the past, with new ingredients added as some is used; nowadays houses do not have a permanent fire in cold weather, and the dish is cooked for a specific meal. Many countries have similar dishes with local ingredients.

A fiery pot of noodles! Very nice. Let’s have a look!

Here’s the lid (click image to enlarge). Notice the French? I got this one in Vancouver, BC from T&T Supermarket.

Here are the side panels (click image to enlarge). Contains beef.

The noodle block.

The spicy soup base sachet.

Has a nice color and spicy scent.

A second soup base sachet. What is Sul-Long-Tang? Again, I consult Wikipedia:

Seolleongtang is a Korean broth tang (soup) made from ox bones (mostly leg bones), brisket and other cuts. Seasoning is generally done at the table according to personal taste by adding salt, ground black pepper, red pepper, minced garlic, or chopped spring onions. It is a local dish of Seoul.[1]

Seolleongtang is typically simmered over a low flame over a period of several hours to an entire day, to allow the flavor to be gradually extracted from the bones. It has a milky off-white, cloudy appearance and is normally eaten together with rice and several side dishes; the rice is sometimes added directly to the soup.[2]

Very light color and a garlicky scent.

Here are the larger pieces I got out of the cup (they aren’t contained in a sachet). Big pieces of mushroom and green onion.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added egg, Walla Walla sweet onion and beef I sauteed with qa little garlic salt. The noodles are really quite good for a cup version. They are wide and have a nice texture and quality. The broth is excellent. It’s spicy, but not so spicy that it makes you run for something to drink (if you can’t handle the heat, slap a couple sliced of processed cheese on top of and stir it in – it’s really good that way). What’s nice about that is that you can also taste the nice flavor of beef and garlic. Finally, the included veggies are good too – they hydrate very well. Most notably, the mushrooms do really well and have a nice flavor. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 031146021857.

[AMAZONPRODUCTS asin=”B00BEIKRBY”]

Here’s an awesome video about how they make the Shin Black Cup!

This is a great video about the plant tours at Nongshim America. The gentleman who gives the tour in the video gave me and my wife the same tour in May of 2012! At 2m37s you can see a picture of us on the wall from our day at Nongshim America! If you can get down there and do a plant tour, you’ll be greeted by some of the nicest people I’ve had the fortune to meet and have a really fun time! You can find out more about the plant tours here.

Recipe: The Ramen Rater’s Shin Ramyun Black Burger

Recently, I came up with the ramyun slider. I thought since I’ve got some Shin Black on hand, why not a full-fledged ramyun burger? This recipe came out great and really wasn’t that hard to do.

The Ramen Rater’s Shin Ramyun Black Burger

  • 1 Package Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black
  • ground beef
  • 1 egg
  • 2 slices processed cheese
  • frozen french fries
  • cooking spray
  • ketchup and mayonnaise

The noodle block. This is where our buns come from.

In this recipe, everything in the package is used. I’ve seen so many recipes for ramen burgers where the flavorings are discarded. Why waste?

Step 1: Boil a pot of water. Add the noodle block and cook for 4 minutes. Drain well. Return to pot and crack egg into it – combine with noodles. Split noodle/egg mixture into two bowls. I used one with a rounded bottom for the bun and one with a flat bottom for the lower bun (actually, the top part of a bun is called the ‘crown’ and the bottom the ‘heel!) Press the noodles down a little and then put in the fridge for a couple hours to set.

Here are the crown and heel all done and out of their bowls.

Step 2: Spray pan and cook both sides of your buns until done as you like. A nice crispness is really enjoyable, but burnt isn’t so great so just keep and eye on them and don’t flip too much – they are a little delicate.

Step 3: For the fries – use a little cooking spray on them and sprinkle liberally with the gold Sul-Long-Tang powder packet and cook.

Step 4: Empty the contents of the green package into a little bowl and add some hot water. Let sit for a minute or so which lets the veggies and other bits hydrate. Drain.

Step 5: Add ketchup and mayonnaise – I used a little more mayo than ketchup – and combin3. This will be the fry sauce as well as the sauce for the burger.

Step 6: I’m not very good at telling when meat is done, so my wife Kit cooked the patty for me! For the patty, add the entire red packet to the ground beef and combine well. Form into a patty and cook. Put the buns and burger together – add processed cheese and sauce.

Voila! Click image to enlarge). This came out really nice – the burger has a really great flavor from the red packet. I think you could switch it as well – use the red packet on the fried and the gold packet with the beef. Either way, this was really good – I hope you try it and let me know how it goes!

A Nice Surprise From Nongshim America!

Was looking at my posts and found this on that I hadn’t posted for some reason – check it out – it’s from 2013

When we got home from the hospital yesterday, I called the apartment office to see if there were any packages – they said there was one. A mailer from Nongshim America – what’s inside?

There were a couple of sheets of stickers… I immediately put them in one of my noodle binders (yes, I have binders full of instant noodle stuff – mostly the lids and empty packaging).

Holy cow! Two sheets of special postage stamps with PSY and Shin Black Cups! Thank you! What’s funny is that when I was very young, I collected stamps, and then my mother took that over once I lost interest. So one sheet will stay in the binder and one will go to my mom. Thanks to Ray A., Hannah C. and all the great folks down in Rancho Cucamonga at Nongshim America – miss you guys!

The Ramen Rater’s Top Ten Instant Noodle Cups Of All Time 2013 Edition

Cups were the second instant noodle innovation that really took the world by storm. Nissin founder Momofuku Ando of Japan decided that a cup would be a really handy way to have instant noodles on the go. His creation came to the market in 1971. Forty-two years later, the instant noodle landscape is filled with many different cup designs and contents – some all inclusive only needing hot water,m and some requiring a little more with packets – and some even with forks! Of all the varieties I’ve tried to date, here are my favorite ten.

#10: Pot Noodle Bombay Bad Boy Flavour – United Kingdom

Pot Noodle is a UK company whose plastic cups are things of legend. Their myriad of interesting flavors are always fascinating, with such greats as Sticky Rib, Jamaican Jerk and now Piri Piri. Bombay Bad boy has a nice spiciness to it from a little supplied packet. These don’t have so much of a broth, but more of a sauce or gravy. Original review here

#9: Nissin Cup Noodle Seafood Curry – Hong Kong

Since 1971, Nissin Cup Noodle has been synonymous with… Well, noodles in a cup! The noodles come out just perfectly in these. Not only that, there are copious amounts of veggies and seafood. Then there’s the flavor – a really nice Japanese curry with seafood notes – great stuff! Original review here

#8: Paldo Gomtang – South Korea

Gomtang (pronouced gohm-tahng) is a traditional South Korean soup made with brisket or oxtail. It has a rich, hearty taste that will warm your bones on a wintry day. This one has such a warm and creamy flavor and the noodles are nice and full in the ramyun style. Original review here

#7: Eat & Go    Spicy Chicken Mi Instan Cup – Indonesia

I only just had this one recently and was immediately enthralled. Contains five different seasoning packets which provide chili powder, veggies, seasoned oil and even a packet of tofu chips! Plus, you get a fork. Pure deliciousness! Original review here

#6: Ottogi Bekse Curry Myon Cup – South Korea

This little cup has some wonderful attributes. The seasoning and noodles end up nicely – the broth is thick and has a strong curry flavor and a nice spiciness. What was also very memorable was that there were potatoes in there – the only time I’ve seen potatoes in an instant noodle. A true friend for the curry fanatic! Original review here

#5: Paldo Kokomen Spicy Chicken Cup – South Korea

This is the third list this year that Paldo Kokomen has appeared on. The broth has such a great melding of the heat of jalapeno pepper and the flavor of chicken. The noodles are very good and the bits of chicken and vegetables are top notch. Original review here

#4: Seven & I Shoyu Noodle – Japan

Yes – they have 7-11 convenience store in Japan! With a great flavor and lots of vegetables and seafood, this is really a memorable cup. Strong soy sauce flavor and perfectly hydrated bits and noodles make this an all time favorite of mine. Original review here

#3: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black Spicy Beef Cup – South Korea

First, Nongshim made Shin Ramyun which is still incredibly popular. Then they upgraded and came out with Shin Ramyun Black. Finally, Shin Black has made it into a cup – and it’s really good! Rich beef flavor and real beef along with thick ramyun noodles. Premium stuff! NOTE: Previously, this was marked as being from the United States. This one shown here was in fact manufactured in South Korea. I will be reviewing the one made in the United States at Nongshim America soon.  Original review here

#2: Nissin GooTa Demi Hamburg-Men – Japan

Another fairly recent discovery. GooTa is a high end offering from Nissin with premium ingredients. Excellent noodles, a beef and tomato inspired broth, veggies like corn and then the topper – a dehydrated hamburger patty. No joke! What’s better than the novelty of the hamburger is that it works so well with the noodles and broth. Wow. Original review here

#1: Indomie Mi Goreng Instant Cup Noodles – Indonesia

Indomie’s Mi Goreng was a variety I was enjoying long before becoming The Ramen Rater. Quality noodles coated in a spicy and sweet combination of flavors that never get old. The way you do it is you add the boiling water, steep for a few minutes, then use the supplied plastic lid which has holes to drain it. Just like the pack version, it comes with all of the standard flavor packets you’re used to and comes out just right. Original review here

The Ramen Rater Top Ten Instant Noodles Of All Time 2013 Edition

It’s been over a year since the last Top Ten List came out and it’s time for a new one. You’ll see some from the old list and some new ones! With that, Welcome to the new Top Ten Instant Noodles Of All Time – 2013 Edition!

#10 MAMA Shrimp Creamy Tom Yum Flavour Oriental Style Instant Noodles – Thailand


I had tried this ages back and wasn’t very fond of it. At the request of readers, I gave it another try and found it to be the best Thai variety I’ve had thus far. The strong bite of the heat and the crisp citrus flavors are of authentic Tom Yum. The noodles are thin and almost crumble when chewed – the texture is different from any others on the list. The creaminess is not of dairy but a cream-like color from boiling shrimp. Full review

 #9: Paldo Kokomen Spicy Chicken Flavor – South Korea


It all started with a South Korean comedian in a TV show cooking contest – the resit is history. Kokomen Is a South Korean ‘white broth’ instant ramyun. It has a great jalapeno chicken kind of flavor which took South Korea by storm. Full review

#8: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black Premium Noodle Soup – United States


Everyone’s had Nongshim’s Shin Ramyun once. It’s spicy and full of noodles. Shin Ramyun Black is Nongshim’s premium version of Shin Ramyun – containing nice big pieces of mushroom and freeze-dried beef that springs to life. Truly excellent ramyun. Made in the United States.  Full review

#7: Sapporo Ichiban Chow Mein – United States


This has always held a spot on my Top Ten Instant Noodles lists. Why? First off, it’s got some great noodles. They suck up all the water as they cook and once you open the seasoning packet and stir in the flavor, the smell is tantalizing. The best bonus here is the little packet of seaweed powder. It’s just right. Made in the United States.  Full review

#6: Myojo Ippei-chan Yakisoba Japanese Style Noodles – Japan


Yakisoba, delivered wonderfully. The tray is filled with boiling water and also acts as a strainer! Great noodles, top-notch veggies – and a bonus: mayonnaise! Makes for a meal of pure deliciousness. Full review

#5: Indomie Curly Noodle With Grilled Chicken Flavour Special Quality Instant Noodles – Indonesia


They got it right when they said these noodles are special. They’re broad and thin with such an enjoyable texture. The flavor is sweet, spicy and perfect. Full review

#4: Nongshim Jinjja Jinjja Flamin’ Hot & Nutty Noodle Soup – United States

I ate a lot of instant noodles in my time. Within the last year or so, I’ve enjoyed this one multiple times. Jinjja Jinjja’s quality noodles, strong heat and unique pork, peanut and black sesame notes make this a real stand-out in the South Korean ramyun market and now here in the United States. Full review

#3: Indomie Mi Instan Mi Goreng Rendang – Indonesia


A deep and rich curry flavor with just the right amount of spiciness. These noodles have a great texture and consistency and taste so good. This ‘stir noodle’ variety is superb. Full review

#2: Prima Taste Simgapore Curry La Mian – Singapore


Curry is one of my favorite all time flavors. Here you’ll find the same high quality lamian noodles and a pair of packets – one of coconut powder and one of curry paste. So simple and so perfect. Truly exceptional. Full review

#1: Prima Taste Singapore Laksa La Mian – Singapore


Pair steamed lamian noodles with a packet of coconut powder and a packet of paste and you’ve got a real game changer here. The noodles are high quality and the broth is luxuriant; light in color with beads of chili oil float in a ballet of splendor. Full review

NOTE: I add a lot of different things to instant noodles as you can see in the photos above. The ratings I give them however are given before any additions are introduced.

 

Re-Review: Nissin Top Ramen Cucharealo Home-Style Tomato Chicken Flavor Ramen Noodle Soup

Thought I’d try this one again – it’s pretty sad – I have nothing new to review! Looking forward to some new varieties coming soon though hopefully! A couple from the UK have informed me that they’re sending a treasure trove of interesting varieties! Can’t wait! In the meantime, here’s the elusive Cucharealo – haven’t seen it for sale anywhere yet. Good stuff! Here’s the original review here.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added a fried egg, cheese, Taxes Pete hot sauce, sweet onions, chicken lunch meat and Urashima Sesame & Salt furikake. The noodles are great – short and there’s tons of them. The broth has a really nice tomato taste with a hit of cumin. Great stuff! Gonna give it a 3.5 out of 5.0 stars yet again. UPC bar code 070662081013 .

This place was amazing when I was a kid; you could put your hand on the window outside and it would make the train inside move! I miss the old guard of the enormous department store.

Re-Review: Paldo Namja Ramyun (Men’s Ramyun)

I have fallen ill with some kind of head cold it seems and I thought something spicy would be good. My lovely wife Kit was kind enough make me some noodles for breakfast – she’s so good to me! Thought I’d have these – they’re available in the US now, but this is a Re-Review of the pack that is sold in Korea. The version sold in the US will be being reviewed soon! Here’s the link to the original review I did during Paldo’s Meet The Manufacturer.

Finished (click to enlarge). She put some odeng and a slice of processed cheese in. The noodles are great, the flavor is superb. I still agree with the old review – 5.0 out of 5.0 stars! Thanks again to my wife for making me feel better while I feel crummy! I love you! UPC bar code 8809296771018 – get it here.

Dude looks quite serious! Namja commercial