Tag Archives: ramyun

#3276: Nongshim Neoguri Seafood & Spicy Ramyun – South Korea

#3276: Nongshim Neoguri Seafood & Spicy Ramyun - South Korea

So you might be wondering – you haven’t reviewed this popular South Korean variety before? Well, yes and no. I’ve had it quite a few times – South Korean versions as well as ones manufactured in the United States. However this particular version is made for Europe and Oceania, so a different export version. I try to hit every version of everything- especially ones people have lots of access to. This one is generally a nice spicy seafood soup – let’s check it out.

Nongshim Neoguri Seafood & Spicy Ramyun – South Korea

#3276: Nongshim Neoguri Seafood & Spicy Ramyun - South Korea

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains fish and crustaceans. To prepare, add everything to 550ml boiling water and cook for 5 minutes. Note the instructions mention dried kelp, which was not present. Finally, stir and enjoy!

The noodle block.

A dry base sachet (watch this being used on the episode of Instant Noodle Recipe Time below).

A sachet of flake.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion, shrimp, carved squid, Busan fishcake, egg yolk, sesame seeds, and pepper flake. The noodles are just about the thickest ramyun I’ve found and work just perfectly with a broth. Strong seafood flavor and great heat and hallmarks of this variety. Lots of seaweed and bits of vegetable galore. 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.  UPC bar code 031146150304.

Korean Hit Nongshim Noodles Ramen Variety 10 pack (Shin,Shin Black,Neoguri Udon,Kimchi Ramyun,Soon Veggie 2each) + (4) Mixx Snack Boxx Chopstick

Watch me cook on Instant Noodle Recipe Time!

Re-Review: Paldo Teumsae Ramyun

Paldo Teumsae Ramyun

This is one that’s been in the Top Ten Spiciest Instant Noodles Of All Time lists for quite some time. It’s also now in the Gourmet Ramen Club Spicy Pack – a box that I’ve selected the varieties for! I thought it was time for a Re-Review as I’m going to be rolling out the new spicy list in early August! Let’s check out this hot one!

Paldo Teumsae Ramyun – South Korea

Paldo Teumsae Ramyun

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add everything to 500cc boiling water and cook 3~4 minutes. Finally, stir and enjoy!

Paldo Teumsae Ramyun

The noodle block.

Paldo Teumsae Ramyun

The soup base sachet.

Paldo Teumsae Ramyun

A deep reddish powder.

Paldo Teumsae Ramyun

The vegetables sachet.

Paldo Teumsae Ramyun

A nice little melange.

Paldo Teumsae Ramyun

Finished (click to enlarge). Noodles come out very well – great chew and quite the quantity. The broth is very very spicy – and has a nice flavor to it as well. Included garnish was great. 3.75 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 448436100613.

Paldo Teumsae Ramyun

Spicy Pack endorsed by The Ramen Rater

 

Unboxing Time: Exotic Noods May Green Box

Unboxing Time: Exotic Noods May Green Box

Every month, the folks at www.exoticnoods.com send me over a box so I can show you what they’ve got going on. There’s some really great stuff in this month’s box and I’ve alkso got a coupon code for you – it’s BOOM! Use it to get a discount! Let’s see what’s in here!

Unboxing Time: Exotic Noods May Green Box – United States

Thank you to Exotic Noods for sending this along! Give em’ a look!

#2769: Ottogi Kimchi Ramen

#2769: Ottogi Kimchi Ramen

Another one I found in Taiwan. This one is quite interesting as far as the packaging goes. Not only do you see Korean print but Chinese as well. This product is definitely for sale in Taiwan only – an export version. As far as the recipe changing from place to place, I have no clue. Here’s a little about kimchi from Wikipedia –

Kimchi (/ˈkɪm/Korean김치translit. gimchi, IPA: [kim.tɕʰi]), a staple in Korean cuisine, is a traditional side dish made from salted and fermented vegetables, most commonly napa cabbage and Korean radishes, with a variety of seasonings including chili powderscallionsgarlicginger, and jeotgal (salted seafood).[1][2] There are hundreds of varieties of kimchi made with different vegetables as the main ingredients.[3][4] In traditional preparations, kimchi was stored underground in jars to keep cool, and unfrozen during the winter months.[2] With the rise of technologykimchi refrigerators are more commonly used to make kimchi.

I’ve been a fan of kimchi for a while – tasty and tangy and spicy. I’ve gotten a lot of reactions to it – most notably my friend Matt B. who literally freaked out and ran out of my kitchen when he smelled it. Honestly, I really don’t know why he had such a reaction – I really like it. Anyways, let’s give this variety a try.

Ottogi Kimchi Ramen – South Korea

#2769: Ottogi Kimchi Ramen

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Unsure whether it contains meat or not. Some interesting things here – lower right, it mentions insurance. In instructions, mentions seasonings and condiments – however there’s only a powder sachet. To prepare, add noodles and sachet contents to 550ml boiling water and cook for 4 minutes. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2769: Ottogi Kimchi Ramen

The noodle block.

#2769: Ottogi Kimchi Ramen

The seasoning sachet.

#2769: Ottogi Kimchi Ramen

Looks like powder and some vegetable matter.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, spring onion, processed cheese and egg. The noodles are great – nice gauge ramyun with a kind of slick outer and chewier inner. The broth was nice as well – tangy kimchi hit to it. Good on the spicy as well. The aftertaste was a bit bitter. 3.5 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 8801045521312.

#2769: Ottogi Kimchi Ramen

Ottogi, Instant K i m c h i  Ramen, net weight 120 g (Pack of 2 pieces) / Beststore by KK8

An Ottogi TV spot – don’t you want to enjoy some mayonnaise right now?

Unboxing Time: The Ramen Rater Spicy Pack By Gourmet Ramen Club

Unboxing Time: The Ramen Rater Spicy Pack By Gourmet Ramen Club

I’m happy to announce that in cooperation with Gourmet Ramen Club, the availability of a new box of noodles! This box has a fiery mix of the hottest of the hot – the spiciest instant noodles in the world! So have a look at the video and get yours today!

Unboxing Time: The Ramen Rater Spicy Pack By Gourmet Ramen Club – United States

There’s some seriously spicy varieties in this pack – and it’s a pretty darn good deal. A lot of these varieties would require you to buy 4 or 5 packs at a time. We’ve gotten rid of that kind of commitments – you get single packs! Not only that , the shipping is included! Finally, you get a card with garnish and recipe tips! All this for $25 – a pretty good deal if you ask me! Also, use coupon code at checkout – HOTLIKEFIRE to get an extra buck off the price!  So, what are you waiting for? Feel the burn!

Unboxing Time: The Ramen Rater Spicy Pack By Gourmet Ramen Club

#2729: Samyang Foods Kimchi Song Song Ramen

#2729: Samyang Foods Kimchi Song Song Ramen ramyun ramyeon spicy buldak stir

Today we have Song Song Kimchi Ramen. These fermented cabbage varieties out of South Korea are among my favorites. I really like the tangy as well as bright, spicy flavors. Kimchi is interesting; it’s cabbage as well as many other ingredients that is allowed to ferment for an amount of time.

#2729: Samyang Foods Kimchi Song Song Ramen ramyun ramyeon spicy buldak stir

Personally, I really like this stuff. Here’s a pic from a local Korean grocery store – they make huge amounts of kimchi in store. We saw them doing it one time a few years back and it’s a serious operation. I’ve introduced kimchi to friends and family in the past with mixed results. My son Andy really doesn’t like it – he tried it when he was around 6 or 7 years old and got the most disgusted look on his face. I opened a jar for my friend Matt B. to give it a try and he literally freaked out and almost ran out of our apartment.

I’ve felt that I’ve had a more adventurous palate than most. The more exotic, the better. Food is a language in which we can learn so much about the daily lives of people from around the world – better to embrace it – whatever we are used to.

It’s not a too distant cousin of sauerkraut, but different. It is said to have some important health benefits. Let’s see what Wikipedia has to say about kimchi –

Kimchi is a traditional Korean dish consisting of pickled vegetables, which is mainly served as a side dish with every meal, but also can be served as a main dish.[47] Kimchi is mainly recognized as a spicy fermented cabbage dish globally, but there are currently more than 200 variations, and continues to grow.[48] These variations of kimchi continues to grow, and the taste can vary depending on the region and season [49]

Kimchi has been a staple in Korean culture, but historical versions were not a spicy dish.[50] Theories of the origin of Kimchi varies including a belief that it appeared during the Shilla Dynasty, and became prevalent once Buddhism caught on throughout the nation and fostered a vegetarian lifestyle.[51] However, the addition of spicy peppers to this cultural dish did not appear until the arrival of Portuguese missionaries in the 1700s who brought chili peppers.[52] The pickling of vegetables was an ideal method, prior to refrigerators, that helped to preserve the lifespan of foods. In Korea, kimchi was made during the winter by fermenting vegetables, and burying it in the ground in traditional brown ceramic pots, and further allowed a bonding between women within the family.[53]

The origin of kimchi dates back at least to the early period of the Three Kingdoms (37 BCE‒7 CE).[19] Fermented foods were widely available, as the Records of the Three Kingdoms, a Chinese historical text published in 289 AD, mentions that “The Goguryeo people [referring to the Korean people] are skilled in making fermented foods such as wine, soybean paste and salted and fermented fish” in the section named Dongyi in the Book of Wei.[20][21] Samguk Sagi, a historical record of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, also mentions the pickle jar used to ferment vegetables, which indicates that fermented vegetables were commonly eaten during this time.[20][22]

A poem on Korean radish written by Yi Gyubo, a 13th century literatus, shows that radish kimchi was a commonplace in Goryeo (918–1392).[4][23][24]

Pickled radish slices make a good summer side-dish,
Radish preserved in salt is a winter side-dish from start to end.
The roots in the earth grow plumper everyday,
Harvesting after the frost, a slice cut by a knife tastes like a pear.

— Yi Gyubo, Dongguk isanggukjip (translated by Michael J. Pettid, in Korean cuisine: An Illustrated History)

However, early records of kimchi do not mention garlic or chili peppers.[25] Kimchi was not red until the late 16th century, when chili peppers were introduced to Korea by Portuguese traders based in Nagasaki, Japan.[25][26][27] The first mention of chili pepper is found in Jibong yuseol, an encyclopedia published in 1614.[20][28] Sallim gyeongje, a 17‒18th century book on farm management, wrote on kimchi with chili peppers.[20][29] However, it was not until the 19th century that the use of chili peppers in kimchi was widespread.[30]The recipes from early 19th century closely resemble today’s kimchi.[31][32]

A 1766 book, Jeungbo sallim gyeongje, reports kimchi varieties made with myriad of ingredients, including chonggak-kimchi (kimchi made with chonggak raddish), oi-sobagi (with cucumber), seokbak-ji (with jogi-jeot), and dongchimi.[20][33] However, napa cabbage was only introduced to Korea at the end of 19th century,[30] and whole-cabbage kimchi similar to its current form is described in Siuijeonseo, a cookbook published around that time.[34]

Kimchi is a national dish of both North and South Korea. During South Korea’s involvement in the Vietnam War its government requested American help to ensure that South Korean troops, reportedly “desperate” for the food, could obtain it in the field;[35] South Korean president Park Chung-hee told U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson that kimchi was “vitally important to the morale of Korean troops”. It was also sent to space on board Soyuz TMA-12 with South-Korean astronaut Yi So-yeon after a multimillion-dollar research effort to kill the bacteria and lessen the odor without affecting taste.[35]

So this Song Song Kimchi Ramen is a little different – it is a broth-free variety. I did look up ‘Song Song’ and tried to figure out what it means but with no luck. However, I asked Samyang Foods – here’s what they had to say:

I’ll answer the question about ‘Song Song’ meaning.
The word ‘Song Song’ we use is not the Song Dynasty regarding a family name.
It’s a Korean word that means chopping into small pieces.
We use it as an adverb(mimetic word). 
For example, Korean can use Song song like this.
chop scallions into small pieces.= Scallions Song Song.

Let’s check out this new variety from Samyang Foods – Song Song Kimchi Ramen.

Samyang Foods Kimchi Song Song Ramen – South Korea

#2729: Samyang Foods Kimchi Song Song Ramen ramyun ramyeon spicy buldak stir

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add boiling water to fill line and cover 3 minutes. Use marks on lid and poke holes to drain. Add in liquid base sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2729: Samyang Foods Kimchi Song Song Ramen ramyun ramyeon spicy buldak stir

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2729: Samyang Foods Kimchi Song Song Ramen ramyun ramyeon spicy buldak stir

The noodle block.

#2729: Samyang Foods Kimchi Song Song Ramen ramyun ramyeon spicy buldak stir

Loose vegetables from the cup.

#2729: Samyang Foods Kimchi Song Song Ramen ramyun ramyeon spicy buldak stir

The liquid base sachet.

#2729: Samyang Foods Kimchi Song Song Ramen ramyun ramyeon spicy buldak stir

Thick stuff!

Finished (click to enlarge). The noodles are pretty good although they seem thinner than their regular ramyun. Could just be me. The flavor screams kimchi and the pieces of kimchi all around are very good. 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 8801073211247.

#2729: Samyang Foods Kimchi Song Song Ramen ramyun ramyeon spicy buldak stir

Samyang Ramen Spicy Hot Chicken Roasted Noodles Variety (12-Pack) | Mala 2X spicy, Original, Cheese, Curry, Ice

The First Noodle Challenge in Indonesia!

#2723: No Brand Delicious Ramen

#2723: No Brand Delicious Ramen - South Korea

Here’s one I found at a Carrefour on my trip to Taiwan in November of 2017. Okay, so it says No Brand. I think that’s pretty evident – and it also says Delicious Ramen. That too is nondescript. I searched for the bar code and found nothing from the pack code and very little from the 5 pack code – basically that it is what it is. An eBay seller had it marked as ‘Korean Noodle Ramyun Rameon’ although that’s a little less than what it says in English on the pack already. My thought is that this might just be a store brand but who knows. Ah ha – I just looked it up by the phone number on the package – 080-023-8593 – and it comes up with a lot of Paldo stuff. Perhaps this is by Paldo. Anyways, I’m guessing it’s time to crack this open and look within.

No Brand Delicious Ramen – South Korea

#2723: No Brand Delicious Ramen - South Korea

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Unsure whether it contains meat. To prepare, add noodle block and seasoning sachet content to 500ml boiling water and cook for 3 minutes 30 second. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2723: No Brand Delicious Ramen - South Korea

The noodle block.

#2723: No Brand Delicious Ramen - South Korea

The soup base sachet.

#2723: No Brand Delicious Ramen - South Korea

The red powder.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion, Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, and processed cheese. The noodles are thick and chewy – much to my liking. Definitely ramyun noodles – unmistakeably so. The broth is a strong beef flavor with a hint of spiciness. 3.5 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 8809296883586.

#2723: No Brand Delicious Ramen - South Korea

Rapid Hot Dog Cooker – Microwave Hot Dogs in 2 Minutes or Less – BPA Free and Dishwasher Safe

This is a thing of beauty to behold

The Ramen Rater’s Top Ten South Korean Instant Noodles Of All Time 2018 Edition

UPDATE: Here’s the new 2019 List!

Top Ten South Korean Instant Noodles

Kicking off Top Ten List season, I bring you the South Korean Top Ten Instant Noodles Of All Time for 2018. I looked at how many varieties from South Korea I’ve reviewed to date and got 326 so far. South Korean varieties continue to evolve and innovate in different ways in order to satisfy the changing needs and tastes of the consumer – definitely keeps things interesting. As always, I ask any companies, whether in South Korea or elsewhere – that would like me to review their products to send me an email! I am happy to talk to you!  Without further delay, let’s have a look at the Top Ten South Korean Instant Noodles list for 2018 – the best South Korean varieties available out of the over 360 South Korean varieties from the over 2,500 varieties of instant noodles I’ve reviewed thus far.

The Ramen Rater’s Top Ten South Korean Instant Noodle Of All Time 2018 Edition

Video Presentation

A video presentation of the Top Ten South Korean Instant Noodles Of All Time 2018 Edition.

The Ramen Rater’s Top Ten South Korean Instant Noodle Of All Time 2018 Edition

#10: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black

#10: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black

When Shin Ramyun Black came onto the scene a few years back it was a huge hit and still is. An upgraded version of their popular shin Ramyun, it includes a sachet of Sul-Long-Tang soup base which gives an extra heartiness to the broth. Thick ramyun noodles and a spicy bite round out the scene. It took me some time to get a pack made in South Korea, a requirement of this this. Original review

#9: Paldo Cheese Noodle

#9: Paldo Cheese Noodle

Paldo’s Cheese Noodle has been on the list for awhile now and with good reason. The way the cheese intermingles with the red spicy broth is amazingly good. The noodles are nice and thick ramyun and there’s a large quantity of them. Definitely one that everyone should try – and now there’s a spicier version on the market. Original review

#8: Nongshim Champong Noodle Soup Spicy Seafood Flavor

#8: Nongshim Champong Noodle Soup Spicy Seafood Flavor

Nongshim Champong is a spicy seafood noodle soup. It combines what you are used to with the beefiness of a standard Korean ramyun but replaces the beef with seafood flavor. This more ‘of the sea’ variety works very well with the chewy ramyun noodle. It’s kind of like a seafood stew to be honest.  Excellent when paired with seafood. Original review

#7: Nongshim Neoguri Stir-fry Noodles Spicy Seafood

#7: Nongshim Neoguri Stir-fry Noodles Spicy Seafood

New to the market is Nongshim’s Neoguri Stir-Fry Noodles. Neoguri Spicy Seafood Soup is a long time favorite of many and now it’s been converted in this new version as a dry noodle, sans broth. To be honest, I like this much better – not only does it have the great flavor of Neoguri, it’s got a plethora of garnish included – featuring little pieces of fishcake with the raccoon mascot on them. Original review

#6: Paldo Rabokki Noodle

#6: Paldo Rabokki Noodle

To understand Paldo’s Rabokki Noodle, you have to understand tteokbokki. It’s also spelled topokki – but however you spell it, tteokbokki are thick cylindrical rice tubes that have a nice chewiness to them. They’re often paired with a thick red sauce which is spicy as well as sweet and served with fishcake, egg and other garnish. These noodles are paired with the sauce in a very tasty representation and crossover of the dish. Original review

#5: Nongshin Chal Bibim Myun

#5: Nongshin Chal Bibim Myun

Nongshim’s Chal Bibim Myun is a cold noodle which is great anytime, but especially during the summer months. A kind of sweet and spicy sauce coats the noodles and is also refreshing at the same time. Pairs very well with fresh cucumber and hard boiled egg. Original review

#4: Ottogi Jin Jjambbong Spicy Seafood Ramyun

#4: Ottogi Jin Jjambbong Spicy Seafood Ramyun

Ottogi’s Jin series added a couple of new varieties recently, and this is my favorite of the two. During a recent trip to Taipei, I went to a restaurant called Love Instant Noodles where they doll up packs of instant noodles and serve them piping hot. This is the one I chose from their selection. Jjambbong is a kind of spicy stew and this one has a nice kind of grilled flavor to it, alongside the popular broader ramyun currently spreading around  – great stuff! Original review

#3: Paldo Budae Jjigae

#3: Paldo Budae Jjigae

Here we have last year’s #1 on this list and it is also on the annual The Ramen Rater’s Top Ten Instant Noodles Of All Time 2017 annual list. So, what’s Budae Jjigae? Well, take donated rations from US soldiers from the Korean War and mix them with the local South Korean cuisine. This interesting fusion works so well including tastes from both cultures. Original review

#2: Ottogi Budae Jjigae Ramen

#2: Ottogi Budae Jjigae Ramen

Ottogi also has a Budae Jjigae – and it’s my favorite of the varieties to spring onto the market in the last couple years. With bits of processed meats and other niceties, it combines with South Korean flavors into a crescendo of tasty goodness. Budae Jjigae translates to ‘troop stew’ or army stew’ as it originated from donated rations from US forces during the Korean War. Original review

#1: Samyang Foods Paegaejang Ramen

#1: Samyang Foods Paegaejang Ramen

The number one this is year is Samyang Foods Pagaejang. This is a very tasty beef noodle with strong flavor – a hearty broth and rich taste. The noodles are just perfect for me – a nice light outer edge and chewier insides. Definitely one to try and I hope it comes to the United States for all here to sample. Original review

#2648: Paldo Bulnak Pan Stirfried Noodle

#2648: Paldo Bulnak Pan Stirfried Noodle - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - bokkeummyun

Today we have an interesting little cup of noodles from South Korea – a little spicy one. This has been on my top ten spicy list for a while now and it’s some mean stuff.

So, as you can see, there’s a little octopus. This is octopus flavor! Nothing like a little octopus and violent heat to begin your day, eh? Well, let’s get to this Bulnak!

Paldo Bulnak Pan Stirfried Noodle – South Korea

#2648: Paldo Bulnak Pan Stirfried Noodle - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - bokkeummyun

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains octopus. To prepare, add boiling water to fill line and cover for 3 minutes. Poke holes in scored spots on the lid and use as a drain spout. Add in the liquid base. Finally, stir and enjoy yourself! (I really love how this one doesn’t just say enjoy, but enjoy yourself)

#2648: Paldo Bulnak Pan Stirfried Noodle - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - bokkeummyun

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge). Note the three little spots toward the top to poke with a chopstick to use as a drain spout.

#2648: Paldo Bulnak Pan Stirfried Noodle - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - bokkeummyun

The noodle block.

#2648: Paldo Bulnak Pan Stirfried Noodle - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - bokkeummyun

Loose bits of vegetable and noodle from the cup.

#2648: Paldo Bulnak Pan Stirfried Noodle - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - bokkeummyun

The spicy liquid base.

#2648: Paldo Bulnak Pan Stirfried Noodle - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - bokkeummyun

Spicy stuff here!

Finished (click to enlarge). Alright so yeah it’s a pretty bad picture. But actually, this is because I did a mukbang with this one. I do YouTube videos quite a bit these days. Anyways. The noodle came out nicely with a strong tooth and excellent gauge. The sauce coated everything and was sweet as well as exceedingly spicy. Vegetable bits hydrated. 3.75 out of 5.0 stars.  UPC bar code 648436101269.

#2648: Paldo Bulnak Pan Stirfried Noodle - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - bokkeummyun

Paldo B u l n a k  Pan Noodle Irresistable Sweet Spicy Ramen (Pack of 4)

Here I am chowing down the pack version

#2623: Samyang Foods Assorted Vegetable Ramen

#2623: Samyang Foods Assorted Vegetable Ramen - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles ramyun

I’ve always loved the beef flavor, spiciness, and thick noodles that define ramyun. I’ve noticed in the past few years a few brands coming out with vegetable flavor ramyun – and they’ve all been pretty good! Looking forward to giving this one a try today!

As I’ve mentioned, I’m usually quite a way ahead on reviews as of late. It’s Tuesday, August 29th, 2017 today, but I’m guessing it’s October when it’s being posted. I really enjoy this time of year here – shadows get longer, it’s cooling off a little bit (although it’s been in the upper 80’s low 90’s here this week).

The big news is Hurricane Harvey in Texas and record flooding, Trump threatening to shut down the government by not funding it over getting his border wall with Mexico, and North Korea launching a missile that flew over Japan.

I’m guessing in 80 days or so people will hopefully have gotten rid of all that water in Texas, Trump will have had his tantrum and North Korea will still be testing its missiles at certain times.  The leaves will be falling off the trees and it’ll be cooler. People will be using their fireplaces and in the evening we’ll get rain. The new Star Trek series will have started as well – something we’re eagerly anticipating here.

Hopefully, the world is in a bit better shape and everyone’s having a good day. Anyways, let’s have some vegetable ramyun!

Samyang Foods Assorted Vegetable Ramen – South Korea

#2623: Samyang Foods Assorted Vegetable Ramen - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles ramyun

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add in sachet contents and fill to line with boiling water. Cover for 4 minutes. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2623: Samyang Foods Assorted Vegetable Ramen - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles ramyun

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2623: Samyang Foods Assorted Vegetable Ramen - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles ramyun

The noodle block.

#2623: Samyang Foods Assorted Vegetable Ramen - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles ramyun

Loose vegetables from the bottom of the cup.

#2623: Samyang Foods Assorted Vegetable Ramen - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles ramyun

The dry base sachet.

#2623: Samyang Foods Assorted Vegetable Ramen - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles ramyun

Smells spicy!

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion and Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts. The noodles plump up nicely and do quite well even though they’re steeped ramyun. The broth has a nice tanginess and heartiness to it. It’s spicy but pretty accessible. The included veggies were good. 3.75 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 8801073210127.

#2623: Samyang Foods Assorted Vegetable Ramen - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles ramyun

Samyang Korean Ramen Family Pack

Do you know the names of Korean vegetables??

#2575: Samyang Foods Kimchi Song Song Ramen

#2575: Samyang Foods Kimchi Song Song Ramen - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Today we have Song Song Kimchi Ramen. Kimchi varieties out of South Korea are among my favorites. I really like the tangy as well as bright, spicy flavors. Kimchi is interesting; it’s cabbage as well as many other ingredients that is allowed to ferment for an amount of time.

#2575: Samyang Foods Kimchi Song Song Ramen - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Personally, I really like kimchi. Here’s a pic from a local Korean grocery store – they make huge amounts of kimchi in store. We saw them doing it one time a few years back and it’s a serious operation. I’ve introduced kimchi to friends and family in the past with mixed results. My son Andy really doesn’t like it – he tried it when he was around 6 or 7 years old and got the most disgusted look on his face. I opened a jar for my friend Matt B. to give it a try and he literally freaked out and almost ran out of our apartment.

I’ve felt that I’ve had a more adventurous palate than most. The more exotic, the better. Food is a language in which we can learn so much about the daily lives of people from around the world – better to embrace it – whatever we are used to.

It’s not a too distant cousin of sauerkraut, but different. It is said to have some important health benefits. Let’s see what Wikipedia has to say about kimchi –

Kimchi is a traditional Korean dish consisting of pickled vegetables, which is mainly served as a side dish with every meal, but also can be served as a main dish.[47] Kimchi is mainly recognized as a spicy fermented cabbage dish globally, but there are currently more than 200 variations, and continues to grow.[48] These variations of kimchi continues to grow, and the taste can vary depending on the region and season [49]

Kimchi has been a staple in Korean culture, but historical versions were not a spicy dish.[50] Theories of the origin of Kimchi varies including a belief that it appeared during the Shilla Dynasty, and became prevalent once Buddhism caught on throughout the nation and fostered a vegetarian lifestyle.[51] However, the addition of spicy peppers to this cultural dish did not appear until the arrival of Portuguese missionaries in the 1700s who brought chili peppers.[52] The pickling of vegetables was an ideal method, prior to refrigerators, that helped to preserve the lifespan of foods. In Korea, kimchi was made during the winter by fermenting vegetables, and burying it in the ground in traditional brown ceramic pots, and further allowed a bonding between women within the family.[53]

The origin of kimchi dates back at least to the early period of the Three Kingdoms (37 BCE‒7 CE).[19] Fermented foods were widely available, as the Records of the Three Kingdoms, a Chinese historical text published in 289 AD, mentions that “The Goguryeo people [referring to the Korean people] are skilled in making fermented foods such as wine, soybean paste and salted and fermented fish” in the section named Dongyi in the Book of Wei.[20][21] Samguk Sagi, a historical record of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, also mentions the pickle jar used to ferment vegetables, which indicates that fermented vegetables were commonly eaten during this time.[20][22]

A poem on Korean radish written by Yi Gyubo, a 13th century literatus, shows that radish kimchi was a commonplace in Goryeo (918–1392).[4][23][24]

Pickled radish slices make a good summer side-dish,
Radish preserved in salt is a winter side-dish from start to end.
The roots in the earth grow plumper everyday,
Harvesting after the frost, a slice cut by a knife tastes like a pear.

— Yi Gyubo, Dongguk isanggukjip (translated by Michael J. Pettid, in Korean cuisine: An Illustrated History)

However, early records of kimchi do not mention garlic or chili peppers.[25] Kimchi was not red until the late 16th century, when chili peppers were introduced to Korea by Portuguese traders based in Nagasaki, Japan.[25][26][27] The first mention of chili pepper is found in Jibong yuseol, an encyclopedia published in 1614.[20][28] Sallim gyeongje, a 17‒18th century book on farm management, wrote on kimchi with chili peppers.[20][29] However, it was not until the 19th century that the use of chili peppers in kimchi was widespread.[30]The recipes from early 19th century closely resemble today’s kimchi.[31][32]

A 1766 book, Jeungbo sallim gyeongje, reports kimchi varieties made with myriad of ingredients, including chonggak-kimchi (kimchi made with chonggak raddish), oi-sobagi (with cucumber), seokbak-ji (with jogi-jeot), and dongchimi.[20][33] However, napa cabbage was only introduced to Korea at the end of 19th century,[30] and whole-cabbage kimchi similar to its current form is described in Siuijeonseo, a cookbook published around that time.[34]

Kimchi is a national dish of both North and South Korea. During South Korea’s involvement in the Vietnam War its government requested American help to ensure that South Korean troops, reportedly “desperate” for the food, could obtain it in the field;[35] South Korean president Park Chung-hee told U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson that kimchi was “vitally important to the morale of Korean troops”. It was also sent to space on board Soyuz TMA-12 with South-Korean astronaut Yi So-yeon after a multimillion-dollar research effort to kill the bacteria and lessen the odor without affecting taste.[35]

So this Song Song Kimchi Ramen is a little different – it is a broth-free variety. I did look up ‘Song Song’ and tried to figure out what it means but with no luck. However, I asked Samyang Foods – here’s what they had to say:

I’ll answer the question about ‘Song Song’ meaning.
The word ‘Song Song’ we use is not the Song Dynasty regarding a family name.
It’s a Korean word that means chopping into small pieces.
We use it as an adverb(mimetic word). 
For example, Korean can use Song song like this.
chop scallions into small pieces.= Scallions Song Song.

Let’s check out this new variety from Samyang Foods – Song Song Kimchi Ramen.

Samyang Foods Kimchi Song Song Ramen – South Korea

#2575: Samyang Foods Kimchi Song Song Ramen - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add noodles and flake into 600ml boiling water and cook for 5 minutes. Drain saving 8 spoons water (120ml). Add in liquid sachet and stir-fry for 30 seconds. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2575: Samyang Foods Kimchi Song Song Ramen - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The noodle block.

#2575: Samyang Foods Kimchi Song Song Ramen - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The liquid base.

#2575: Samyang Foods Kimchi Song Song Ramen - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

A spicy kimchi smell wafts from the cup.

#2575: Samyang Foods Kimchi Song Song Ramen - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The flake sachet.

#2575: Samyang Foods Kimchi Song Song Ramen - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Looks like kimchi to me!

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion and Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts. The noodles come out very well – good gauge and chew to them. The flavor is a strong sort of tomato kimchi and the included kimchi with it is of very good quality – hydrates well and has a nice crunchiness. 4.75 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 8801073113466.

#2575: Samyang Foods Kimchi Song Song Ramen - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Samyang Hek Buldak Extra Spicy Roasted Chicken Ramen Nuclear Edition 5 PackHot Spicy Fire Noodle New spiciest

Samyang Foods makes Buldak Bokkeummyun – the fire noodle challenge range. One of them is ‘ice’ or ‘cool’ – this is served as a cold noodle. Cold noodle varieties are popular for the summer months.

#2559: Jackpot Teriyaki – Beef Ramen

#2559: Jackpot Teriyaki - Beef Ramen - Tulalip - Washington - The Ramen Rater - ramyun korea korean

On June 22nd, we met my sister up in Tulalip, Washington to check out the outlet mall. It’s kind of a misnomer; you think outlet mall, you think cheap prices, right? Well, these are outlet stores for stuff like Coach, Burberry, etc – so you can get overpriced things that are still overpriced but not as cool as if you got it currently for this season. Ugh.

Nonetheless, it was a beautiful day and we had a lot of fun walking around. What’s interesting about Tulalip is that it’s on the Tulalip Indian Reservation next door to Marysville. You may be thinking ‘so what?’ Well, back in 2007 I was in a Computer Info Systems degree program at the local community college. My teacher also taught a Casino Slot Technology class and I decided to take it. He was a great guy – miss him a lot. Anyways, he told me how Tolalip has a zip code. ‘So what?’ came to mind. Well, being on a reservation, that makes it Federal land.

Again, so what?

Well, there’s only one other city in the United States that is on Federal land with a zipcode – Washington, DC. So basically, you commit a crime here, technically it’s a Federal crime. They have their own police department and all, but technically it’s the case. Interesting!

We;;. after walking all over the mall, my sister Sue invited us to have a bite to eat. She said there was this nice teriyaki joint nearby…

Jackpot Teriyaki – Beef Ramen – United States

8825 34th Ave NE Ste J, Tulalip, WA 98271

Phone number(360) 654-2977

#2559: Jackpot Teriyaki - Beef Ramen - Tulalip - Washington - The Ramen Rater - ramyun korea korean

Here’s the menu on the wall (click to enlarge). I’m legally blind and luckily they had little printed take out menus. Well, after looking at the wall menu zoomed in and the one on paper, there’s a difference. The paper one had a section that said ‘special’ and bam – it said Ramen – Beef Flavor. I immediately though beef ramen? Not pork tonkotsu? Not a msi or shio? Maybe shoyu. Yeah – a beef shoyu that must be it. I wasn’t extremely hungry but I thought yeah – let’s give it a try!

#2559: Jackpot Teriyaki - Beef Ramen - Tulalip - Washington - The Ramen Rater - ramyun korea korean

Here’s Miles waiting patiently (click to enlarge) Know that since he’s 22 months old, this is about as patient as you’re ever going to see him and that this ‘patience’ was a fraction of a second.

#2559: Jackpot Teriyaki - Beef Ramen - Tulalip - Washington - The Ramen Rater - ramyun korea korean

Then boom – our meals arrive (click to enlarge). I found the noodles to be curly and that it has mung bean sprouts, egg, cabbage, broccoli and carrot. As I slurped, I was getting the feeling that this was definitely not ramen. The woman who took our order was very nice – our daughter Miriam was in her car seat on the table and she started to get fussy. The woman asked if she would like it if she would feed her her bottle! So she fed her and talked about how mom’s carry their children – in Korea. Then it hit me – this definitely wasn’t ramen – it was ramyun.

I hadn’t said much as I was eating my noodles and when she mentioned that, I looked up and asked ‘Hanguk ramyun?’ Which means ‘Korean Ramyun?’ She seemed to be a little surprised and then I handed her one of my cards. I didn’t get exactly what variety it was, but I’m going to guess it was Ottogi Jin Ramen – the mild one. Maybe the spicy one but with a little extra water.

Regardless, this place rocks – I mean, I got to go out and get a bowl of Korean ramyun made for me – something that never has happened before. Plus, the garnish was absolutely perfect and made my day.I highly recommend this place – 5.0 out of 5.0 stars!