Tag Archives: dandan

#2512: Mom’s Dry Noodle Dan Dan Noodle

#2586: Mom's Dry Noodle Dan Dan Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Here’s a new one from Mom’s Dry Noodle. This one is Dan Dan Noodle flavor – here’s a little about that from Wikipedia –

Dandan noodles or dandanmian (simplified Chinese担担面traditional Chinese擔擔麵) is a noodle dish originating from Chinese Sichuan cuisine. It consists of a spicy sauce containing preserved vegetables (often including zha cai (榨菜), lower enlarged mustard stems, or ya cai (芽菜), upper mustard stems), chili oilSichuan pepper, minced pork, and scallions served over noodles.

Sesame paste and/or peanut butter is sometimes added, and occasionally replaces the spicy sauce, usually in the Taiwanese and American Chinese style of the dish.[1] In this case, dandanmian is considered as a variation of ma jiang mian (麻醬麵), sesame sauce noodles. In American Chinese cuisine, dandanmian is often sweeter, less spicy, and less soupy than its Sichuan counterpart.

The name refers to a type of carrying pole (dan dan) that was used by walking street vendors who sold the dish to passers-by. The pole was carried over the shoulder, with two baskets containing noodles and sauce attached at either end. As the noodles were affordable due to their low cost, the local people gradually came to call them dandan noodles, referencing the street vendors. Literally, the name translates as “noodles carried on a pole”, but may be better translated as “peddler’s noodles”.

A variety of English spellings are used. The first word may be either dandan, dundun or tantan, and the last word may also be spelled mein.

So these are from Taiwan and so far I’ve really liked pretty much everything from Mom’s Dry Noodle. Let’s have a look at this variety.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Dan Dan Noodle – Taiwan

#2586: Mom's Dry Noodle Dan Dan Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, ad noodle block to a pot of boiling water and cook for 6~7 minutes. Drain. Add in all sachets. Finally, stir well and enjoy!

#2586: Mom's Dry Noodle Dan Dan Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

One of the four individual servings.

#2586: Mom's Dry Noodle Dan Dan Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

One of the noodle blocks.

#2586: Mom's Dry Noodle Dan Dan Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

The dry base sachet.

#2586: Mom's Dry Noodle Dan Dan Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

A mottled and coarse concoction.

#2586: Mom's Dry Noodle Dan Dan Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

The first of three liquid sachets.

#2586: Mom's Dry Noodle Dan Dan Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Perhaps a Sichuan pepper oil?

#2586: Mom's Dry Noodle Dan Dan Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

A tan sachet.

#2586: Mom's Dry Noodle Dan Dan Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Looks like sesame paste

#2586: Mom's Dry Noodle Dan Dan Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

A smaller liquid sachet.

#2586: Mom's Dry Noodle Dan Dan Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Smells like soy sauce.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added scallion and ground pork. The noodles came out with a very nice chew. They aren’t mushy whatsoever and have a confident backbone. The flavor is very good as well. The notes of sesame, Sichuan pepper oil, Sichuan pepper in the dry mix and soy sauce all work together and play well with eachother; nobody’s feet get stepped on. Simple yet complex. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 4717011150322.

#2586: Mom's Dry Noodle Dan Dan Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Formosan Odyssey: Taiwan, Past and Present

A video featuring Kyle from Mom’s Dry Noodles from a few years back

New Product Samples From Mom’s Dry Noodle

New Product Samples From Mom's Dry Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Got this box in the mail a couple days ago from Taiwan! Wonder what’s inside. Let’s find out!

New Product Samples From Mom’s Dry Noodle – Taiwan

New Product Samples From Mom's Dry Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Miles tackles the green customs inspection tape.

New Product Samples From Mom's Dry Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

This is the new Mom’s Dry Noodle Dan Dan Noodles (click to enlarge). Note that they are about the same size as my 23-month old son’s head! They’ve done a bit of a change for this packaging – looks really nice! Thank you – looking forward to giving these a try!

#2475: Maruchan Seimen Red Spicy Dandan Men

#2475: Maruchan Seimen Red Spicy Dandan Men - Japan - The Ramen Rater - マルちゃん正麺 カップ うま辛担担麺

Here’s one from Javier over at www.BoxFromJapan.com – thank you! So Box From Japan is a subscription service – every month, you can get a different four bowls of instant ramen from Japan – pretty awesome!  This one’s dandanmen – let’s see what Wikipedia has to say about this variety –

Dandan noodles or dandanmian (simplified Chinese: 担担面; traditional Chinese: 擔擔麵) is a noodle dish originating from Chinese Sichuan cuisine. It consists of a spicy sauce containing preserved vegetables (often including zha cai (榨菜), lower enlarged mustard stems, or ya cai (芽菜), upper mustard stems), chili oil, Sichuan pepper, minced pork, and scallions served over noodles.

Sesame paste and/or peanut butter is sometimes added, and occasionally replaces the spicy sauce, usually in the Taiwanese and American Chinese style of the dish.[1] In this case, dandanmian is considered as a variation of ma jiang mian (麻醬麵), sesame sauce noodles. In American Chinese cuisine, dandanmian is often sweeter, less spicy, and less soupy than its Sichuan counterpart.

The name refers to a type of carrying pole (dan dan) that was used by walking street vendors who sold the dish to passers-by. The pole was carried over the shoulder, with two baskets containing noodles and sauce attached at either end. As the noodles were affordable due to their low cost, the local people gradually came to call them dandan noodles, referencing the street vendors. Literally, the name translates as “noodles carried on a pole”, but may be better translated as “peddler’s noodles”.

There are a variety of English spellings. The first word may be either dandan, dundun or tantan, and the last word may also be spelled mein.

Alright – let’s check it out!

Maruchan Seimen Red Spicy Dandan Men – Japan

#2475: Maruchan Seimen Red Spicy Dandan Men - Japan - The Ramen Rater - マルちゃん正麺 カップ うま辛担担麺

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Probably contains meat and fish. To prepare, add 410ml boiling water and vegetable sachet and cover for 5 minutes. Add in powder and liquid sachets. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2475: Maruchan Seimen Red Spicy Dandan Men - Japan - The Ramen Rater - マルちゃん正麺 カップ うま辛担担麺

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2475: Maruchan Seimen Red Spicy Dandan Men - Japan - The Ramen Rater - マルちゃん正麺 カップ うま辛担担麺

The noodle block.

#2475: Maruchan Seimen Red Spicy Dandan Men - Japan - The Ramen Rater - マルちゃん正麺 カップ うま辛担担麺

The powder base sachet.

#2475: Maruchan Seimen Red Spicy Dandan Men - Japan - The Ramen Rater - マルちゃん正麺 カップ うま辛担担麺

Lots of powder!

#2475: Maruchan Seimen Red Spicy Dandan Men - Japan - The Ramen Rater - マルちゃん正麺 カップ うま辛担担麺

The liquid base sachet.

#2475: Maruchan Seimen Red Spicy Dandan Men - Japan - The Ramen Rater - マルちゃん正麺 カップ うま辛担担麺

Looks kinda cool!

#2475: Maruchan Seimen Red Spicy Dandan Men - Japan - The Ramen Rater - マルちゃん正麺 カップ うま辛担担麺

The vegetable sachet.

#2475: Maruchan Seimen Red Spicy Dandan Men - Japan - The Ramen Rater - マルちゃん正麺 カップ うま辛担担麺

Looks like mincemeat, spring onion and sesame.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, sliced chashu pork and spring onion. Noodles are awesome – chewy and very premium. Broth is very strong; salty and rich with a deep flavor. Indeed, I always get a taste of peanut in dandanmen. The included vegetables and mincemeat are quite good. 4.75 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4901990337496.

#2475: Maruchan Seimen Red Spicy Dandan Men - Japan - The Ramen Rater - マルちゃん正麺 カップ うま辛担担麺

5PX6 pieces Maru-chan Seimen curry udon

A Maruchan TV commercial.

#2278 – Nissin Raoh Japanese Instant Ramen Dandan Noodles

Here’s another one from Colin from the east coast – thanks again! So to start with, a little about the originin of these noodles. You se here they’re referred to tantanmen, however they’re also dandanmein – Wikipedia, if you please:

The name refers to a type of carrying pole (dan dan) that was used by walking street vendors who sold the dish to passers-by. The pole was carried over the shoulder, with two baskets containing noodles and sauce attached at either end. As the noodles were affordable due to their low cost, the local people gradually came to call them dandan noodles, referencing the street vendors. Literally, the name translates as “noodles carried on a pole”, but may be better translated as “peddler’s noodles”.

The corresponding Japanese dish is tantan-men, a form of ramen (formally 担担麺, as in Chinese, but often written with , or with 坦 instead of 担).

A variety of English spellings are used. The first word may be either dandan, dundun or tantan, and the last word may also be spelled mein.

So this is based on street food basically. I love street food. Plus, I’m hungry. Let’s check it out!

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Unsure whether it contains meat. To prepare, add noodle block to 500ml boiling water and cook for 4 minutes. Add in sachet contents. Stir and enjoy!

The noodle block.

A large powder sachet.

Has a peanut scent.

A liquid sachet.

A deep red orange liquid.

Finished (click to enlarge).  Added spring onion, fried garlic and nanami togarashi. The noodles were luxury – thick and with a nice chew to them. The broth was very thick — more saucelike. It had a neat taste; a peanuttiness although with a mild heat and a hearty consistency. Excellent! 4.75 out of 5.0 stars.  JAN bar code 4902105900291.

Nissin – Raoh Japanese Instant Ramen Dandan Noodles 17.1oz (For 5 Bowls)

Not sure what’s going on here completely but it’s entertaining and involves Nissin Raoh!

#2163: Nissin Piritto Karakuchi Tantan Udon

Here’s another one sent by the kind folks at www.BoxFromJapan.com. You can subscribe to a monthly box of instant noodles from Japan – and what’s amazing is that every month they’ve sent me one, I’ve never gotten one that I’ve reviewed before! Here’s what they had to say about this variety:

Chinese dish, but arranged in the characteristic Japanese style of Donbei broth Soup: Ground sesame is used to add avor to the bonito dashi stock, with a Japanese-style Dandan broth which is slightly spicy. Noodles: Springy Udon noodles which go together perfectly with the characteristic Donbei soup. Its compatibility with the soup is outstanding. Ingredients: Minced meat, Chinese cabbage, round slices of red pepper, and spring onions.

Sounds like something a little different – let’s check it out!

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains meat and fish. To prepare, add in dry sachet content and fill to line with boiling water. Let steep for 5 minutes. Add in liquid sachet contents. Stir and enjoy!

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

The noodle block.

The dry sachet.

Very coarse and chunky stuff.

The liquid sachet.

Has a definite sesame scent.

Finished (click to enlarge). The udon hydrated nicely – wide flat and chewy noodles. The broth is thick and hearty. Almost has an earthy kind of taste like mushroom, yet with a fermented tofu hint as well. The meat and cabbage was prevalent and delicious. 4.25 out of 5.0 stars.  JAN bar code 4902105221877.

Nissin Hokkaido Gentei KITA no DONBEI Dashi Curry Udon 12capsx1case

My new favorite Nissin Japan video.

#1213: Nan Jie Cun Hot-Dry Instant Noodles Chilli Flavour

Here another one I got up in Canada at T&T Supermarket in Richmond, BC. Never have I seen this brand before and thought ‘hey – this in interesting!’ What’s more, it’s actually heavy! What’s inside this thing making it so heavy? It took me a bit of looking to find out about this brand and it’s products. Here’s a little something I read on Wikipedia about where the manufacturing facility is:

Nanjie (Chinese: 南街村; pinyin: Nánjiē Cūn) is a village in Linying County, Henan province, China, widely reported as being the last Maoist village in China.[1][2][3] It is under the administration of the town of Chengguan, which also serves as the county seat.In 1992, the GDP of this village exceeded 100 million yuan and became the famous “billion village” at that time,but its output growth is proportional to the loans form some national banks of China.Since it is Unable to repay its huge loans, it is added to the reputation blacklist. There are rumors of bankruptcy about this village.

I decided I wanted to check out whether there was a company website. Nan Jie Cun isn’t a company, but a collective run by the people of Nanjie Village. In true Maoist fashion, they all participate in the production of products and in turn, they can all go to a store and get them for free. There is no currency in Nanjie. During my search, I found this website in English.

I looked at the root domain and found what I was looking for. This place is referred to as a village but looks very big and modern in all the photos. After digging, I found the village’s products page and the noodles.

I looked around and found that this place has kept all the images and ways of the Cultural Revolution – it looks absolutely fascinating. I’ve found that through my study of instant noodles from around the world, it’s given me the opportunity to find out about some pretty interesting places, Nanjie Village being one of them. Let’s check these noodles out!

Importer sticker (click image to enlarge). Looks to be meat–free but check for yourself. Take out everything, put the noodles and the dry vegetables sachet back in and add boiling water for 1-2 minutes. Drain. Add the rest of the sachets and stir.

Here’s a detail of the front with the instructions (click image to enlarge).

Hooray! An included fork!

The fresh noodle bag.

The mustard stem sachet (front and back).

They look nice and crunchy.

Dehydrated vegetables sachet.

Green onions, carrot and sesame.

Spicy sauce sachet.

Has a very rich and spicy scent.

The sesame sauce sachet.

The peanut scent is strong.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added sweet onion and beef I sauteed with a little garlic salt. the noodles are alright – nice fresh noodles. The flavoring reminds me of dandan noodles – very hot and spicy and dry; dry flavor. Peanut butter and chilli oil abound. The mustard is crunchy and of good quality. Despite the good quality of the ingredients, the flavor is very monotone; hot spicy and peanut butter/sesame taste. I think this may be another instance of me really disliking traditional Chinese flavors (I really dislike a brand of Sichuan province that makes sweet potato thread). I’m sure if you like Chinese flavors like these though, you will be very pleased – I certainly would like to try more of their varieties and will attempt to contact them in hopes of a Meet The Manufacturer spotlight as my curiosity is piqued. 0.5 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 6938618411076.

Here’s a video clip about Nanjie Village.

#983: Meet The Manufacturer – Sun Noodle Tantanmen Spicy Sesame Flavor Ramen (Mild)

Winding down the Sun Noodle Meet The Manufacturer with the next to last review. I must say there have been some really good ones in this bunch! Here’s something I’ve not tried previously – Tantanmen. Tantanmen as described by Wikipedia:

Dandan noodles or Dandanmian (traditional Chinese: 擔擔麵, simplified Chinese: 担担面) is a classic dish originating from ChineseSichuan cuisine. It consists of a spicy sauce containing preserved vegetables (often including zha cai, 榨菜, lower enlarged mustard stems, or ya cai, 芽菜, upper mustard stems), chili oil, Sichuan pepper, minced pork, and scallions served over noodles.

Sesame paste is sometimes added, and sometimes replaces the spicy sauce, usually in the Taiwanese and American Chinese-style of this dish.[1] In this case, Dandanmian is considered as a variation of Ma Jiang Mian (麻醬麵), sesame sauce noodles. In American Chinese cuisine, Dandanmian is often sweeter, less spicy, and less soupy, and peanut butter is sometimes added.

The ingredients and directions (click image to enlarge).


The noodles. You get two of these and two of the seasoning packets.

The liquid seasoning packet.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added kamaboko, green onion, sweet onion, hard boiled egg and Urashima Sesame & Salt furikake. The noodles rock – nice gauge and great feel – almost buttery. The broth has a strong sesame flavor. I also detect a flavor reminiscent of peanut butter and a slight spiciness. This one’s interesting! 3.75 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 085315400059.

A look indie Sun Noodle – video here.

#795: Master Kong Red Oil Dan Dan Noodles

Here’s another one that Bo H. sent me from China! Thanks again! So what are Dan Dan noodles? here’s what Wikipedia says:

Dandan noodles or Dandanmian (traditional Chinese: 擔擔麵, simplified Chinese: 担担面) is a classic dish originating from ChineseSichuan cuisine. It consists of a spicy sauce containing preserved vegetables (often including zha cai, 榨菜, lower enlarged mustard stems, or ya cai, 芽菜, upper mustard stems), chili oil, Sichuan pepper, minced pork, and scallions served over noodles.

Alrighty then, let’s give it a try!

I cut and pasted all the text from the lid and scanned it. Click to enlarge.

Hey – chopsticks!

Here’s the big packet of spicy paste.

That’s a lot of goopy stuff – looks spicy!

The vegetables.

Looks like a nice little bunch of veggies.

Then there’s this little pouch with little hard things in it…

I ate one and I think they get sprinkled on top at the end.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Interesting… This one was fun to try; I’m really looking forward to these Master Kong’s as they’re huge in China and these aren’t available around this neck of the woods, that’s for sure. The noodles aren’t bad, – there’s a lot of them too. The flavor is a little bit spicy and a bit greasy. The veggies are nice. The only problem here is it seems kind of bland to me. Could use a little more flavor I think. 2.75 out of 5.0 stars.UPC bar code 6903252084818 .

Here’s a Master Kong commercial

How to make DanDan noodles at home