Tag Archives: special

#2726: Wei Lih Chinese Special Spicy Pork Noodle

#2726: Wei Lih Chinese Special Spicy Pork Noodle 台湾 维力中华特餐-麻辣猪肉面

Here’s another one I brought home from Taiwan in November 2017. Thanks again to friends on facebook for helping with the translation.

So this one features a spicy Sichuan pepper heat along with a retort pouch full of pork! Let’s have a look at this one – something you’ll never be able to find here in the United States!

Wei Lih Chinese Special Spicy Pork Noodle – Taiwan

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains pork. To prepare, add in all sachets but retort pouch and fill to line with boiling water. Cover for 3 minutes with retort pouch on top. Add in retort pouch contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2726: Wei Lih Chinese Special Spicy Pork Noodle 台湾 维力中华特餐-麻辣猪肉面

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2726: Wei Lih Chinese Special Spicy Pork Noodle 台湾 维力中华特餐-麻辣猪肉面

The noodle block.

#2726: Wei Lih Chinese Special Spicy Pork Noodle 台湾 维力中华特餐-麻辣猪肉面

The dry base sachet.

#2726: Wei Lih Chinese Special Spicy Pork Noodle 台湾 维力中华特餐-麻辣猪肉面

Powder and vegetables.

#2726: Wei Lih Chinese Special Spicy Pork Noodle 台湾 维力中华特餐-麻辣猪肉面

A paste sachet.

#2726: Wei Lih Chinese Special Spicy Pork Noodle 台湾 维力中华特餐-麻辣猪肉面

Thick and oily!

#2726: Wei Lih Chinese Special Spicy Pork Noodle 台湾 维力中华特餐-麻辣猪肉面

The retort pouch, full of meat!

#2726: Wei Lih Chinese Special Spicy Pork Noodle 台湾 维力中华特餐-麻辣猪肉面

Oh yeah – now you’re talking!

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion. The noodles have a nice flat broad shape. RThey have a sturdier chew than others I’ve had as well. The broth is hearty, however, the level of Sichuan pepper spiciness was a little on the lackluster side. Bit of vegetable floated around here and there. The retort pouch added pork and sauce which added an extra heartiness. The pork was surprisingly sweet – I expected a spicier taste. Whether expected or not, it was welcome. 4.25 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 4710199110058.

#2726: Wei Lih Chinese Special Spicy Pork Noodle 台湾 维力中华特餐-麻辣猪肉面

W e i   L i h   Oridinal Classic Braised Flavor Sauce for cooking noodle 維力 炸醬罐 800g

A clkassic TV commercial from this brand

#2063: Mamee Pepper Noodles Vegetarian

Here’s the third one I’m reviewing as part of a special thing with the Apple Daily news folks in Hong Kong! They sent a few varieties to review and this one is sold in Hong Kong, however it’s made in Malaysia. Curious about this one – let’s check it out!

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. to repare, add noodle block to 2 cups boiling water and cook for 2 minutes. Add in sachet contests. Stir and enjoy!

The noodle block.

The soup base sachet.

A grainy concoction.

An oil sachet.

Corn oil.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, coriander, tofu pok and spring onion. The noodles are very good – standard gauge and nice tension to them. The broth has a black pepper taste alongside a kind of buttery taste, one that I’ve experienced in many vegetarian instants. 3.25 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 051325110226.

The Taste of Old Hong Kong: Recipes and Memories From 30 Years on the China Coast

A cartoon showing how Mamee makes their noodles.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Lucky Me! Special Instant Pancit Bihon With Kalamansi

Rice vvermicelli isknown by many names in the world; bihun, beehoon, bihon – it’s all the same thing! One thing though – these noodles are made with corn starch! But pancit – let’s see what wikipedia has to say:

Pancit or pansit is the term for noodles in Filipino cuisine. Noodles were introduced into the Philippines by the Chinese and have since been adopted into local cuisine. The term pancit is derived from the Hokkien pian i sit (Chinese: 便ê食; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: piān-ê-si̍t or Chinese: 便食; pinyin: biàn shí) which means “something conveniently cooked fast.”[1] Different kinds of noodles can be found in Filipino supermarkets which can then be cooked at home. Noodle dishes are also standard fare in local restaurants. Food establishments specializing in noodles are often referred to as panciterias.

Nancy Reyes Lumen of the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism writes that according to food lore handed down from the Chinese, noodles should be eaten on one’s birthday.[1] They are therefore commonly served at birthday celebrations and Chinese restaurants in the Philippines often have “birthday noodles” listed on their menus. However, she warns that since “noodles represent long life and good health; they must not be cut short so as not to corrupt the symbolism.”[1]

Another one here is kalamansi. What is that? Again, wikipedia:

Citrofortunella microcarpa, the calamondin or calamansi, is a fruit tree in the family Rutaceae in native Asia. Other English language common names include calamonding, calamandarin, golden lime, Philippine lime,Panama orange, Chinese orange, and acid orange.[1] Its cultivation has spread throughout Southeast Asia, India, Hawaii, the West Indies, and Central and North America.[2] The plant is characterized by wing-like appendages on the leaf stalks and white or purplish flowers. Its fruit has either a spongy or leathery rind with a juicy pulp that is divided into sections.

The fruit is indigenous and widely cultivated in the Philippines (Tagalog: calamansi or kalamansî [kɐlɐmɐnˈsɪʔ]; Visayan: limonsito or simuyaw [sɪˈmujɐw]), Malaysia (Also known as limau kasturi) and neighboring northern parts of Indonesia. It is available year-round in the Philippines and is usually seen in its unripened green state. When left to ripen it turns a tangerine orange.

I has always thought that kalamansi was just the Filipino word for lime! Now it sounds more like a smaller kind of thing, like a lime and a kumquat combined. Interesting! Let’s check out Lucky Me! Special Bihon – with kalamansi!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Looks to be meat free, but check for yourself. To prepare, add vegetables sachet content and noodle block to a bowl and cover with boiling water. Cover for 4 minutes and drain. Add in contents of remaining sachets and stir well. Enjoy!

The bihon block.

The powder base sachet.

A light powder.

A dual sachet of seasoned oil and sauce.

The two seen here co-mingling.

The vegetables sachet.

An interesting mix – looks to be green onion and regular onion.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added pork, sweet onion, spring onion, shrimp, carrot and bell pepper sauteed with soy sauce. The noodles are thin and light. They don’t have to strong of a chewiness which I liked in this one. The flavor is kind of a light meat kind of thing with a little sweet and savory in there but no spiciness. The garnish hydrated well and added a little something something. 3.75 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 4807770272547.

I couldn’t find the Bihon variety on Amazon, but here’s the Pancit Canton Kalamansi flavor!

A short documentary by the BBC about the Philippines.

Meet The Manufacturer: #1532: Lucky Me! Special Instant Noodles Jjamppong Flavor

Well everyone, today is Thanksgiving! I thought I’d like to thank everyone who visit The Ramen Rater every day – your attention and interest inspires me to continue on in my journey to find the best instant noodles in the world and let you know about them! I wanted to also thank you for buying things using the Amazon links I provide. These aren’t products directly from me, but from people/companies selling them on Amazon, and I get a little something every time one of you uses a link and either buys the item shown or browses and finds something else they’d like. This really helps us out, especially around the holidays. If you’re planning on doing holiday shopping on Amazon, consider something from the Noodle Shop or simply go to the Noodle Shop and click on the Amazon logo. You’ll be helping keep The Ramen Rater running ! Thanks, and Happy Thanksgiving!

Jjangppong is one of two popular Korean-Chinese dishes, the other being Jjangmyeon which is a broth free dish of noodles with black bean sauce. Wikipedia has this to say about Jjangppong:

Jjamppong (Korean: 짬뽕, Chinese name: 炒碼麵), a spicy noodle soup flavoured with onions and chili oil. A form of jjamppong is also the local Chinese speciality in the Japanese port city of Nagasaki (see Chanpon). The noodles are made from wheat flour.

Instant Jjamppong usually has a rich seafood broth and pictures on the front of the package showing the noodle soup accompanies by assorted seafood. Let’s have a look at Lucky Me! special Jjamppong!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Contains fish. To prepare, add contents of package and sachets into a large bowl. Add 400ml boiling water to bowl and cover for 3 minutes. Stir and enjoy!

A round noodle block.

The soup base sachet.

Has a nice spicy seafood scent.

A solid ingredient sachet.

Looks to be mostly small bits of seafood.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added octopus, mussels, clams, shrimp, squid, green onion and sweet onion. The noodles are thin and have a nice lightness to them – much like one would find in a cup noodle but a little different. The broth has a very good spiciness and seafood flavor which I would expect in a jjamppong instant and works well. The solid ingredients hydrated well and were of excellent quality. 4.5 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 4807770273100.

Lonely Planet Philippines (Travel Guide)

A Lucky Me! Special Jjamppong TV advertisement.

Meet The Manufacturer: #1529: Lucky Me! Special Instant Curly Spaghetti With Yummy Red Sauce

I have tried a few quick spaghetti in the past – from South Korea, Japan and Indonesia, but never from the Philippines! I had a look to see if there’s a particular way in which spaghetti is enjoyed in the Philippines and as it turns out, I found some recipes that included hot dogs. Interesting! Well, let’s have a look at this unique instant variety = Lucky Me! Curly spaghetti!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, cook noodles in briskly boiling water for 4 minutes. Drain. Combine with sauce and enjoy!

The noodle block. The noodles look much wider than most.

The sauce sachet.

The sauce has a sweet tomato scent.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added minced beef, zucchini, bell pepper, mushroom, basil paste, Jane’s Krazy Mixed Up Salt and sauteed it all together and mixed it in and topped with herbed parmesan cheese. The noodles are definitely large gauge – larger than ramyun even. They also have an excellent chewiness to them. The flavor is a sweet tomato sauce which coats everything quite well. 4.0 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 4807770272516.

Get it on Amazon

Filipino Soul Food – Chef Maria Ford is a magna cum laude graduate of the Texas culinary academy and owner of the Cebuana Filipino store in Austin TX. She is a native of Cebu and immigrated to the US in 2003. She was featured in the 2010 east Austin stories documentary “Filipino Soul Food” by Rhea Rivera. In 2010 Chef Maria Ford created her Meryendahan celebration to promote Filipino food, culture and arts. Now Chef Maria Ford is poised to take the culinary world by storm with the release of her first cookbook entitled Filipino Soul Food. This book contains the recipes that Maria prepares on a daily basis and that her loyal customers have grown to love over these past two years

A TV advertisement for Lucky Me! Special Curly Spaghetti With Yummy Red Sauce.

Meet The Manufacturer: #1527: Lucky Me! Special Baked Mac Style Instant Macaroni

Macaroni is used in a lot of Filipino cuisine. One I’ve tried in instant form is Sopas, a soup with macaroni in it. The weather here is really quite cold (at least for Washington). It’s gotten down to as low as 26 degrees Fahrenheit the last few nights. This looks like a nice warm stick-to-your-ribsy kind of thing. Let’s check it out!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add macaroni to briskly boiling water and cook for 4 minutes. Drain. Add in sachet contents and combine. Enjoy!

A large sachet of noodles.

Kind of like a rotini tube macaroni.

The sauce sachet.

Smells pretty good!

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added thin sliced beef I sauteed and coriander. The noodles have a nice shape and chew to them. The sauce is very good – it has a sweetness and tomato flavor and is frequently augmented with bits of textured vegetable protein which are just like little bits of real hamburger. This was a very pleasant surprise. 4.5 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 4807770273049.

The Adobo Road Cookbook: A Filipino Food Journey—from Food Blog, to Food Truck, and Beyond

A TV commercial for Lucky Me! Special Baked Mac Instant Macaroni.

#1402: Pop Bihun Spesial Rasa Kari Ayam Pedas

Here’s one a friend in Indonesia sent me a while back – thanks! So these are rice noodles – which are called bihun over in Indonesia. Rasa Kari ayam Pedas translates to spicy curry chicken flavor. This looks like a tasty one – let”s see how it comes out.

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, boil 350ml water and add noodle block. Put seasoning sachet contents in a bowl, except the fried onion sachet. After noodles have cooked for 2 minutes, put in bowl and stir. Garnish with fried onion. Enjoy!

The rice noodle block.

A dual sachet of dry ingredients – soup base on the left and chilli powder on the right.

The chilli powder atop the soup base.

Another dual sachet – fried onion on the left and seasoned oil on the right.

The seasoned oil.

Fried onion garnish.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added chicken, hard boiled egg, bell pepper, sweet onion and BonCabe Level 10 chilli seasoning. The noodles have a slightly smaller gauge than your standard fried wheat noodle. Kind of a nice gauge for rice noodle as well. They have a light chewiness and are pleasant to eat. The broth is quite good – a nice chicken curry flavor is augmented by the oil whichh gives it a little heartiness. The fried onion garnish adds a nice finish. 3.75 out of 5.0 stars.UPC bar code 089686038118.

Here’s a TV advertisement for Indofood’s Pop Bihun.

#1128: Lucky Me! Special Instant Pancit Bihon With Kalamansi

Hey look! Something from The Philippines! I can’t remember the last time I had anything from The Philippines (looked it up – August 18th, 2012 – almost a whole year ago). You might be wondering, what is pancit bihon? Wikipedia says:

Pancit or pansit is the term for noodles in Filipino cuisine. Noodles were introduced into the Philippines by the Chinese and have since been adopted into local cuisine. The term pancit is derived from the Hokkien pian i sit (Chinese: 便ê食; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: piān-ê-si̍t or Chinese: 便食; pinyin: biàn shí) which means “something conveniently cooked fast.”[1] Different kinds of noodles can be found in Filipino supermarkets which can then be cooked at home. Noodle dishes are also standard fare in local restaurants. Food establishments specializing in noodles are often referred to as panciterias.

Nancy Reyes Lumen of the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism writes that according to food lore handed down from the Chinese, noodles should be eaten on one’s birthday.[1] They are therefore commonly served at birthday celebrations and Chinese restaurants in the Philippines often have “birthday noodles” listed on their menus. However, she warns that since “noodles represent long life and good health; they must not be cut short so as not to corrupt the symbolism.”[1]

Holy cow! I’m gonna live forever! With that, let’s check these noodles out.

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Looks to be meat-free but check for yourself.

Thin rice noodles.

Powder base.

Has a sweet and salty scent.

The liquid packets – soy sauce on the left and seasoned oil on the right.

Interesting colors.

The veggie packet.

A curious melange.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added Walla Walla sweet onion, red bell pepper and beef sauteed with a little soy sauce. The noodles are as thin as can be. That coupled with the fact that they’re rice noodles gives them a really crumbly texture.. The flavor is nice though, with a sweet and salty balance which works well. The veggies hydrated nicely as well. 3.25 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 4801110272547.

A Lucky Me! TV commercial.

Re-Review: Indomie Curly Noodles With Grilled Chicken Flavour (Mie Keriting Rasa Ayam Panggang)

I’m going to go out on a limb here. I would say that if I were held down and demanded to answer the question “what is your favorite instant noodle of all time” that I would probably say it was this one. I would also say the Special Fried Curly Noodle that tops the Top Ten Instant Noodles Of All Time list; they’re both equally amazing and awesome. What I can’t believe is that I haven’t had it since review #51! That’s ANCIENT! I used to eat this one all the time.

Here’s the sticker the distributor puts on (click to enlarge).

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge).

Here’s the noodle block – notice the special curliness.

Dehydrated veggies on the left, seasoning powder on the right.

Neat looking veggies.

The seasoning powder.

Hey look – more seasoning powder and chili powder – huh?

So if you look at the directions on the pack, you’ll notice below there’s a mention of soup. With this stuff, you make the noodles like regular Mi Goreng but there’s also a soup you add at the end.

Seasoned oil.

Tasty tasty!

Here’s a littler family portrait of all the seasonings together.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added sweet onion, stir fry veggies, turkey breast, fried egg and Dua Belibis chili sauce. The noodles are great – flat and broader than your standard Indomie noodles. Yes – they’re curly as well! The flavor is sweet and spicy with a little chick flavor. The broth adds another facet as the noodles aren’t dry but have a nice small amount of broth. Excellent – pure wonderful! 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.UPC bar code 089686040159 – find it here.

Indomie 40th Anniversary TV commercial

Big LED screen with special stuff for Indomie’s 40th Anniversary!

#869: Vina Acecook Good Bean Vermicelli Chicken Flavour

I’ve got to say, this is some of my favorite packaging. I really like the big drumstick in the picture and the old english exclaiming ‘good.’ I hope it’s good! I’d rather it be better than just good, but I think I’ll just wait and see.

The back of the package (click to enlarge).

The bean thread block.

The seasoning powder.

Salty and chinkenny.

The seasoned oil.

Smells good too.

The veggie packet!

Quite an ample supply of vegetable bits.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added hard boiled egg, baked chicken, Krazy Mixed Up Salt and Huy Fong Sriracha hot chili sauce. The noodles are, well, pretty good. They break easily when you purse your lips. The broth is good. Has a great chicken flavor. Only issue is that it has a kind of sting to it – wish I had a better word. Not like the bite of a spicy pepper, but different. The veggies were wonderous. All in all I think this was pretty ‘good.’ I think bean thread is growing on me. 3.25 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 8934563328115 .

A Vina Acecook video about bean vermicelli.

Chung Kết VietNam Digital DJ Battle 2012 – SBD 27 – Nguyễn Thanh Tuấn (Nguyễn Nhạc)

#776: Sarimi Isi 2 Rasa Kari Spesial

Here’s one of the new varieties sent by a friend in Jakarta, Indonesia – thank you! After trying so many Indonesian instant noodles, it looks like the flavors are almost backwards – Rasa means flavor, kari means curry and spesial means, well, special. Flavor curry special? Special curry flavor! It’s also a big pack and looks like it’s a soup. Well, let’s give it a try.

Here’s the back of the packaging (click image to enlarge). Was a little tough scanning this one – sorry. Note it calls for 500cc of water – never have I seen an Indonesian variety call for so much water – unless it was to be drained off!

Here’s part of the noodle block. As these traveled from Indonesia, they had a couple bumps along the way. Did really good for the most part!

Seasoning powder on left and chili powder on the right.

Here they are with the chili powder on top.

Seasoned oil.

I have a feeling this is all going to be quite good!

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added some veggies – some big pieces of onions as well, and a couple fried eggs with Krazy Mixed Up Salt and Tabasco Buffalo Style hot saume on top. The noodles are very good – very fluffy and happy. The broth is great – has a nice curry flavor and a nice overall consistency. This stuff is perfect if you want a lot of curry noodles! 3.75 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 089686017724 .

Here’s a Sarimi Isi 2 commercial for a different flavor

Indonesian hard rock from the 70’s

#724: Meet The Manufacturer: Indomie Curly Noodle With Laksa & Chilli

So we start off Meet The Manufacturer: Indomie week with something new – most of the reviews I’ll be doing will come from a shipment of samples I received a few weeks back from Indonesia. Indofood sent them very kindly and I want to thank them again for their generosity. So here we go with something completely different! Read the interview I did with Indomie here!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). This one’s not a dry noodle but a soup.

Ate a couple of the little crumbs that were in the bottom of the bag raw – tasty!

This is a liquid soup base.

Smells nice!

Here’s the dry stuff. Says it’s tofu, veggies and shrimps!

Quite a bit of it too – should be good!

Finished (click image to enlarge). I added a little bit of store brand stir-fry vegetables. The noodles are wonderful – the same as what you find in the other Indomie ‘Special’ varieties that you can get over here. The flavor was not what I expected. It was light and mellow – kind of like a coconut cream with a light hint of chilli and light sweetness as well as some spices. It was bland in comparison to other Indomie flavors I’ve had. The garnish is great – little tofu bits are really good. This was a definite departure from what I’m used to with Indomie’s offerings and I am really curious to see what else I’ll find during this week of samplings! This was a nice, light noodle soup with some exotic tones. 3.5 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 089686040203 .

Older Nigerian Indomie commercial

Watch this all the way through – it’s really amazing how fast the skillet gets moving! They’re making Nasi Goreng (fried rice I believe) in Indonesia!