Tag Archives: satay

#3171: Doll Bowl Noodle Satay & Beef Flavour – Hong Kong

#3171: Doll Bowl Noodle Satay & Beef Flavour - Hong Kong

Here’s one I found up in Canada at Aberdeen Centre in a shop that was rife with Hello Kitty plushies and exotic candies and snacks next to the food court – I want to say it was called something like Paint Box or Art Box. This one was a nice surprise as it’s been tough to find Doll Brand varieties other than their export pack versions around here. I reall would love to do a Meet The Manufacturer series with Doll, so if you’re listening, please contact me! Let’s check out this Beef & Satay variety from Hong Kong!

Doll Bowl Noodle Satay & Beef Flavour – Hong Kong

#3171: Doll Bowl Noodle Satay & Beef Flavour - Hong Kong

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains fish and shrimp. To prepare, add sachet contents and boiling water to fill line. Cover for 3 minutes. Finally, sir and enjoy!

#3171: Doll Bowl Noodle Satay & Beef Flavour - Hong Kong

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#3171: Doll Bowl Noodle Satay & Beef Flavour - Hong Kong

The noodle block.

#3171: Doll Bowl Noodle Satay & Beef Flavour - Hong Kong

A dry sachet.

#3171: Doll Bowl Noodle Satay & Beef Flavour - Hong Kong

Soup base powder.

#3171: Doll Bowl Noodle Satay & Beef Flavour - Hong Kong

A wet sachet.

#3171: Doll Bowl Noodle Satay & Beef Flavour - Hong Kong

An oily sauce.

#3171: Doll Bowl Noodle Satay & Beef Flavour - Hong Kong

A clear garnish sachet.

#3171: Doll Bowl Noodle Satay & Beef Flavour - Hong Kong

A colorful assortment.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, beef sauteed with Thai Cafe peanut sauce, spring onion, soft egg and black sesame seeds. Noodles hydrated nicely. Broth has a very strong flavor of satay and is really savory – included garnish included nice bits of scrambled egg. 4.25 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 4892333101549.

#3171: Doll Bowl Noodle Satay & Beef Flavour - Hong Kong

Doll Instant Noodles, Spicy Artificial Pork, 3.49 Ounce (Pack of 5)

Watch me cook on Instant Noodle Recipe Time!

#3106: Double Mountain Xiamen Instant Noodles Satay Flavor – China

#3106: Double Mountain Xiamen Instant Noodles Satay Flavor - China

Here’s one that was sent to me by the man who runs this company! He sent a very nice letter along with these – check out the Unboxing Time video to hear more! This one’s satay flavor and has been around now for over 30 years! Wow! Let’s give it a try!

Double Mountain Xiamen Instant Noodles Satay Flavor – China

#3106: Double Mountain Xiamen Instant Noodles Satay Flavor - China

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Unsure whether it contains meat – check for yourself. To prepare, add noodles to 500ml boiling water and cook 3 minutes. Add in sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#3106: Double Mountain Xiamen Instant Noodles Satay Flavor - China

The noodle block.

#3106: Double Mountain Xiamen Instant Noodles Satay Flavor - China

A dry sachet.

#3106: Double Mountain Xiamen Instant Noodles Satay Flavor - China

A granular mixture.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion, Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, fried garlic, shrimp, and chicken. The noodles are very good – gauge and mouthfeel are great. The broth has a very tasty satay flavor which works extremely well. Very impressed and would love to try more from this range. 4.25 out of 5.0 stars.   EAN bar code 6943004000017.

#3106: Double Mountain Xiamen Instant Noodles Satay Flavor - China

The Cambridge Illustrated History of China

Watch me cook this up on Instant Noodle Recipe Time!

Meet The Manufacturer: #2457: KOKA Instant Noodles Chicken Satay Flavour

Meet The Manufacturer: #2457: KOKA Instant Noodles Chicken Satay Flavour - Singapore - The Ramen Rater - Tat Hui

I don’t think I’ve had a satay flavor variety in a long time so this should be interesting. Indeed, we should see what Wikipedia has to say about satay –

Satay (/ˈsæt/, /ˈsɑːt/ sah-tay), or sate in Indonesian and Malaysian spelling, is a dish of seasoned, skewered and grilled meat, served with a sauce.[1] Satay may consist of diced or sliced chicken, goat, mutton, beef, pork, fish, other meats, or tofu; the more authentic version uses skewers from the midrib of the coconut palm frond, although bamboo skewers are often used. These are grilled or barbecued over a wood or charcoal fire, then served with various spicy seasonings. Satay can be served in various sauces, however most often they are served in a combination of soy and peanut sauce.[2] Hence, peanut sauce are often called as satay sauce.[3]

Satay originated in the Indonesian island of Java.[4][5][6][7] It is available almost anywhere in Indonesia, where it has become a national dish.[8][9] It is also popular in many other Southeast Asian countries, including Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei, Thailand, the Philippines, East Timor as well as in Suriname and the Netherlands, as Indonesia and Suriname are former Dutch colonies.

Satay is a very popular delicacy in Indonesia; the country’s diverse ethnic groups’ culinary arts (see Indonesian cuisine) have produced a wide variety of satays. In Indonesia, satay is a popular street food,[4] it can be obtained from a travelling satay vendor, from a street-side tent-restaurant, in an upper-class restaurant, or during traditional celebration feasts. For Malaysia, satay is a popular dish—especially during celebrations—and can be found throughout the country. In Southern Philippines it is known as satti.

There’s a bit of info for you. So a peanut and soy sauce kind of chicken taste. Indeed it sounds interesting. Let’s check it out!

KOKA Instant Noodles Chicken Satay Flavour – Singapore

Meet The Manufacturer: #2457: KOKA Instant Noodles Chicken Satay Flavour - Singapore - The Ramen Rater - Tat Hui

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add noodle block to 450ml boiling water and cook for 2 minutes. Add in sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

Meet The Manufacturer: #2457: KOKA Instant Noodles Chicken Satay Flavour - Singapore - The Ramen Rater - Tat Hui

The noodle block.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2457: KOKA Instant Noodles Chicken Satay Flavour - Singapore - The Ramen Rater - Tat Hui

A dual sachet.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2457: KOKA Instant Noodles Chicken Satay Flavour - Singapore - The Ramen Rater - Tat Hui

The powder soup base.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2457: KOKA Instant Noodles Chicken Satay Flavour - Singapore - The Ramen Rater - Tat Hui

A seasoned oil.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, coriander and chicken sauteed with peanut butter, Huy Fong sriracha chilli sauce and sesame seeds. The noodles are good – a nice little bit of backbone, a decent gauge. The broth has a good bit of oiliness and the flavor is a little peppery, a little a little sweet and a kind of chicken taste going on. It’s unique and tasty. 3.5 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 8888056813162.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2457: KOKA Instant Noodles Chicken Satay Flavour - Singapore - The Ramen Rater - Tat Hui

Koka Instant Noodles Laksa Singapura Flavorl 85g. Pack 5

A video showing chicken satay being grilled in Singapore.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2021: Urban Noodle Authentic Street Food Satay

To kick things off, we have the Satay variety. Satay is hugely popular, but I have a feeling most people don’t know the whole story – here’s what Wikipedia has to say about Satay:

Satay (/ˈsæt/, /ˈsɑːt/ sah-tay), modern Indonesian and Malay spelling of sate, is a dish of seasoned, skewered and grilled meat, served with a sauce.[1] Satay may consist of diced or sliced chicken, goat, mutton, beef,pork, fish, other meats, or tofu; the more authentic version uses skewers from the midrib of the coconut palm frond, although bamboo skewers are often used. These are grilled or barbecued over a wood or charcoal fire, then served with various spicy seasonings.

Satay originated in Java, Indonesia.[2][3][4] It is available almost anywhere in Indonesia, where it has become a national dish.[5][6] It is also popular in many other Southeast Asian countries, including Malaysia, Singapore,Brunei, Thailand, the Philippines, as well as in Suriname and the Netherlands, as Indonesia and Suriname are former Dutch colonies.

Satay is a very popular delicacy in Indonesia; the country’s diverse ethnic groups’ culinary arts (see Indonesian cuisine) have produced a wide variety of satays. In Indonesia, satay can be obtained from a travelling satay vendor, from a street-side tent-restaurant, in an upper-class restaurant, or during traditional celebration feasts. In Malaysia, satay is a popular dish—especially during celebrations—and can be found throughout the country. In Southern Philippines it is known as satti.

Close analogues are yakitori from Japan, shish kebab from Turkey and the Middle East, shashlik from the Caucasus, chuanr from China, and sosatie from South Africa. It is listed at number 14 on World’s 50 most delicious foods readers’ poll complied by CNN Go in 2011.[7]

Alright – let’s delve into this, the first of five different varieties I’ll be reviewing for this Meet The Manufacturer.

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, empty noodle pouch into box and separate with a fork. Add sauce sachet contents, close box back up and microwave at 650W for 2 minutes (I have an 1100W microwave with power settings of 1-10 so going to use 6). Stir and enjoy!

The noodle pouch.

The sauce sachet.

A thick liquid with a pleasing scent.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts and spring onion. The noodles had a great chew and gauge to them. Not rubbery from the microwaving, either. The flavor was really great – a nice bit of peanut and a rich satay taste. The omnipresence of baby corn was not only nice, it went perfectly and they were of excellent quality. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 5011673403017.

British Food: An Extraordinary Thousand Years of History

A film showing street food in London’s Greenwich Market.

Meet The Manufacturer: #1842: Forest Noodles Purple Sweet Potato Noodle With Taiwanese Sauce

I think one of my favorite things are noodles that have something differe – like these. Purple noodles are pretty fascinating – first off, they’re purple. I remember hearing about ‘Space Potatoes’ a while back – somehow crossing the stuff that makes eggplants purple with a potato. I think blue potatoes would be kind of neat, but how would they taste? Well, let’s see how these noodles taste!

The back of the package (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add a little salt to a pot of boiling water. Add in noodle block and cook 5.5-6.5 minutes. Drain. Add in sachet contents. Stir and enjoy!

Purple noodles!

The sauce sachet.

Has a sweet scent.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added beef and coriander. The noodles had a very nice chew to them- excellent quality. The sauce coats everything nicely and has a great Taiwanese satay taste to it. Very ‘stick to your ribs’ kind of stuff – nice and hearty. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Taiwan (Bradt Travel Guides)

A short video about cooking with purple sweet potatoes.

#1206: China Best Frozen Satay Sauce Noodle

Here’s one I got up in Canada at T&T Supermarket – thanks! Never tried this before. Looks interesting though – let’s check it out!

Here’s the distributor’s label (click image to enlarge).

One end of the box (click image to enlarge).

Here’s the other end with the instructions (click image to enlarge).

When you open the box you will find three of these pouches.

A fresh noodle block.

Sauce sachet.

Has a seafood scent; not what I expected.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added boiled chicken. The noodles were only so-so – they were quite pasty and glutenous to the point of being overly so. The flavor was fishy and had no hints of peanut which I sorely missed. Very oily and greasy. 1.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Here’s a short video about tourism and Taiwan.

Meet The Manufacturer: #1093: Amianda Noodle Hakka Flat Noodles – Satay Sauce

I don’t know what made me do it, but I felt a need to consult Wikipedia on satay and Taiwan. So I did and found this:

Shacha sauce (Chinese: 沙茶; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: sa-te; also spelled sa cha sauce), or paste is a Chinesecondiment primarily used in Fujian, Teochew, and Taiwanese cuisines. It is made from soybeanoil, garlic, shallots, chilis, brill fish, and dried shrimp.[1] It has a savory and slightly spicy taste.

The ingredient has multiple uses:

  • as a base for soups
  • as a rub for barbecued meats
  • as a seasoning for stir fry dishes
  • as a component for dipping sauces, for example as used in hot pot meals

Shacha sauce is also known as sa-te sauce in the Hokkien dialect, reflecting its origin back to the satay sauce introduced by expatriate Chinese returning from South East Asia. It is however quite different from the peanut-based satay sauce popular in Malaysia, Indonesia, and Singapore.

Was glad I did – I thought that this might be more of a chicken or beef kind of flavor, but I would’ve been completely wrong. So, satay or shacha, here it is!

The back of the package (click image to enlarge). May contain seafood.

The noodle block. Note that these are hakka noodles – wide!

The sauce packet.

The sauce has a soy sauce scent.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added Vidalia sweet onions. The noodles are broad and have such a nice texture – so like an egg noodle but not eggy! The flavor is light; and has a seafood taste that’s very enjoyable. Reminds me of shrimp shumai. 4.5 out of 5.0 stars.

A fish market in Taiwan.

#1043: Chewy Rice Vermicelli Satay Chicken Flavour

Yep – another one from my Canadian birthday trip! Let’s check this one out.

 

Export sticker (click image to enlarge).

Back of the package (click image to enlarge); Doesn’t look to be any meat ingredients, but check yourself.

The wispy noodle block.

Powder packet.

Has a lighthearted, high pitched scent – like a chicken and sage smell.

The paste packet.

Reminds me of heavily herbed chicken.

Veggies.

A yellow smell; saffron and herbal notes.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added a fried egg, red, yellow and orange bell pepper, sweet onion, chicken I seasoned with garlic salt and baked and some broccoli. The noodles are kind of uninteresting; they’re very thin and wispy and don’t seem to have a lot of character to them. The broth has a deep and rich chicken flavor and another flavor I can’t quite put my finger on… Like an oily chicken skin grease thing going on. The veggies did alright. This was a peculiar one. 3.0 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 6920377218317.

Sp my friend is in a metal band and gonna go and see them play tomorrow night. They’re called Ravages Of Time – here’s their MySpace page – listen to ’em 🙂

#993: Unox Good Noodles Sate

I got a couple sent to me from Holland by a reader names Sister Laoban – thanks! I’ve tried Good Noodles before when someone sent me some from over there once before. This one looks interesting – satay.

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Shiny silver packets don’t scan so well.

The noodles did pretty good for coming from so far away through the mail!

The powder seasoning.

Has a peanut-like scent.

Seasoned oil.

Not a lot of it.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added some broccoli and an almond to garnish. The noodles are very thin and light – they have that ‘comfort food’ feel that a non-gourmet brand would have. The flavor is very interesting; it tastes good – spices and a peanut component. The scant 250mL of water is all but absorbed by the noodles (I used the soup method on the package). Decent noodles! 3.5 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 8711200189106.

Looks like Unox parties hearty here at a New Year’s happening!

#740: Indomie Mi Instan Mi Goreng Sate

Here’s a good one – this is the Indnesian local version of the first Indomie I ever tried – Satay. Curious if it’s any different.

Back of the package (click image to enlarge).

Noodles ready to be made tasty!

Seasoning powder on the left, chili powder on the right.

Here they are together.

The triple packet of wonder! From left to right: hot, sweet chili sauce, sweet soy sauce and fried onions.

This stuff is really good and you can get it in a big bottle at most Asian groceries – looks for Manis Pedas!

This is a really thick and sweet soy sauce – again an easy one to find but usually comes in a really big bottle. Luckily, it’s usually quite cheap. Look for Kecap Manis.

The fried onion is sprinkled on top and finishes it all nicely.

Finished (click image to enlarge). I added some corned beef, a little vegetable mix, a fried egg, a little kizami shoga (pickled ginger) and a touch of Krazy Mixed Up Salt. So according to the interview, I think this would qualify as ‘INTERNET.’ The noodles are awesome! They grab the flavorings so well and the taste is divine – although it’s a little sweeter than I remember. There is a tiny bit of heat though – it’s really quite excellent. The fried onions give it a really nice little crunch. I love this stuff – 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.  UPC bar code 089686011005 – get the US version here.

This looks really good – and it’s portable!

I’ve tried these things in the past – they have them here in the US at big Asian supermarkets.

#682: Indomie Instant Cup Noodles Mi Goreng Satay

Michael Chen over at Eastland Food Corporation sent me this a little while ago along with some other great samples! Thanks! Never have I seen this before, have you?

The top…

Here’s the side (click image to enlarge)!

Seasoned oil, sweet soy sauce and fried onions. What you’d expect in Indomie’s satay packs.

Dry seasoning and chili powder.

A folding fork? Awesome!

Unbagged…

Unfurled fork!

After you steep the noodles, you uncover and drain with the lid. Then dump all the seasonings in and stir.

Finished (click image to enlarge). My thoughts: the noodles come out fantastic, but the packets are tough to open and add and stir. I spilled the noodles a couple times here and there. The noodles and seasoning are amazingly good as their regular satay pack is and just slightly different too as the noodles are steeped. Excellent flavor, just a little tough for me to make work. I think others probably would have less trouble with it. I’m giving this a 4.25 out of 5.0! UPC barcode 089686180688 .

Indomie Lebaran commercial

Awesome video narrated by Carl Sagan – first in a series I’ll do on here. Thanks taintedbloop!

Re-Review: Indomie Instant Noodles Mi Goreng Satay Fried Noodles

This is one of the samples sent by Empire International – thanks again to them and Jim C.! Many years ago, I tried this stuff. This was the first Indomie product I’d ever tried! I used to get tons of this stuff – my folks would bring it back to Anacortes from Seattle , a bit of a journey for noodles! All the packets, the draining, the eggs… This is where it all begand for me.

Click image to enlarge. Here’s the package back – notice Empire International’s info towards the bottom.

Such awesome noodles – they are really great!

Alright let’s start from left to right. Seasoned oil, sweet soy sauce, fried onion bits, powdered seasoning and chili powder. Five packets of awesomeness!

Here’s everything but the onions awaiting the drained noodles and some stirring.

Click image to enlarge. Added a couple eggs with Chef Paul Prudhomme’s Meat Magic and a bunch of drops of Huy Fong Sriracha Chili sauce. The noodles are great. The flavor is sweet and salty and the little bits of onion on top give it a wonderful zestiness. The chili powder give it a little heat too. I made two packages – it’s so good. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars! Get it here.

An Indomie commercial

I think this is one of the commercials from Africa

Here’s a music video