Category Archives: Urban Noodle

The Ramen Rater’s Bottom Ten Instant Noodles Of All Time 2019 Edition

It’s that time again – time to run down the worst varieties I’ve ever had. That’s no small task either – this list is current as of review #3180. These are the ten worst ones, in my opinion, leaving a lasting negative impression on my taste buds. With that, I again give you what you want.

The Ramen Rater’s Bottom Ten Instant Noodles Of All Time 2019 Edition

Video Presentation

Watch me run through The Ramen Rater’s Bottom Ten Instant Noodles Of All Time 2019 Edition.

The Ramen Rater’s Bottom Ten Instant Noodles Of All Time 2019 Edition

#10 – Master Kong Artificial Abalone Crab Flavor Instant Noodle – China

Definitely a knock-off of sorts. Although I see these as Master Kong/Kang Shi Fu often, they most definitely aren’t. Moreover, the broth has an absolutely foul taste to it. I’m sure it’s safe to eat, but I would never want to cross paths with this one again. Original review

#9 – Koyo Reduced Sodium Garlic & Pepper Ramen – United States

The noodles are thick – more like ramyun. They have an alright chew; although they seem almost doughy- and not Hakata style ramen noodle doughy. The broth does taste of garlic and pepper, but it’s so very bland. It really is like you could boil some pepper and a clove of garlic and achieve the same results. Not at all to my liking. Original review

#8 – Urban Noodle Authentic Street Food Black Bean – United Kingdom

The noodles in this one were flat instead of round. They came out very nicely. The flavoring however was just strange. I expected maybe something of a Korean-Chinese fusion dish, but those are hearty and rich and not savory and sweet. In fact, this one was a little too sweet for me. The thinly sliced bamboo shoots don’t work for me either; leaving them whole would be nicer I think. What’s more, it has a kind of chemically aftertaste; like chlorine or soap. Original review

#7 – One Dish Asia Japanese Ramen Noodle – United States

This one comes with a fresh noodle pouch. They didn’t have a very fresh texture; more mushy. The bamboo shoots (which more resembled overcooked carrot and I had to consult the ingredients to figure what they were) were mushy as well. The broth had an acidic and a flavor reminiscent of the teriyaki flavor I’ve encountered in bad teriyaki instant flavors. A hot mess. Original review

#6 – Acecook Super Cup Pringles Sour Cream & Onion Yakisoba – Japan

The Ramen Rater's Bottom Ten Instant Noodles Of All Time 2019 Edition

I love yakisoba and Japan offers many different versions. This one however gets no love from me. This viral monstrosity might be neat to look at but for me it stopped there. Imagine taking a butter knife and scraping off the powder from every chips in a tube of sour cream and onion chips. Then sprinkle over noodles. Just gross – I think these two products should never come together. Original review

#5 – Isoyama Shoji 18 Prohibited / Restricted / Only La-Men Curry Taste – Japan

First, this is a lot of food. There’s reason for the warning on this pack. 700cc water and a few minutes cooking brings you a huge bowl of noodles. While in general that’s not a complaint, the flavor is. It’s violently spicy for starters. It does have a curry flavor, which at first glance is great. Then you have to taste it. You’d think all that water would dilute the sachet that comes with it but no dice here. Too much flavor and heat are the theme here, and it’s a bitter song to swallow. Original review

#4 – Baijia Single Noble Black Bone Chicken Flavor Instant Sweet Potato Noodles – China

I was told by a guy from the company that this indeed was believed to be medicinal and helpful to women having their ‘time of the month.’ I’ve also been told by a reader that people generally don’t like black bone chicken soup even in China. Very slimy sweet potato noodles, thick, greasy broth and horrid veggies that didn’t hydrate well was just a flavor, texture, and complete food hole nightmare for me. This was just horrible stuff that I couldn’t stand. Original review

#3 – Maruchan Bariuma Goboten Udon – Japan

Do you like earthy things? Like dirt? Maybe throw a ton of salt on it – does that do the trick for you? This one has just huge amount of burdock root. Burdock is great in small amounts, but this much just turns this variety into a bowl of something that just screams salty dirt. A full frontal assault on the taste buds that leaves me wondering if when they made this if they tasted it. Original review

#2 – Dr. McDougall’s Vegan Pad Thai Noodle Soup – United States

The Ramen Rater's Bottom Ten Instant Noodles Of All Time 2019 Edition

Where do I begin. Well first off, when one in the United States thinks of Pad Thai, they think of what they might find at a Thai restaurant. Okay so the rice noodles came out nicely – short, flat and broad and well hydrated, but they’re short and cut like egg noodles.. Now for the broth. Thin. Nothing like pad thai. Has a little lime flavor and a kind of herbal taste. The floating bits of tofu are a lot like the marshmallows you get in the hot chocolate that comes with marshmallows. This is as far from pad thai as I can even express in words. It’s like someone gave a broken description of pad thai to someone who has short term memory problems and no taste buds a week prior and told them to make it. I kind of feel personally violated and offended. Never thought this would slip to 2nd on this list.. Original review

#1 – Simply Asia Singapore Street Noodles Classic Curry – United States

A nice looking package with the enticing words of ‘classic curry’ brings an image of something really special. This isn’t the case though. Rice noodles come out very mushy, but curry with sligtly soggy noodles wouldn’t be so bad if it tasted like curry. Basically the flavor is a lot of lemongrass and strongly lacks authenticity. It’s like if you went to a restaurant, ordered some french fries, and they brought you a soda that said french fries on it. Just wrong on so many levels. Offensive in the highest. Original review

 

The Ramen Rater’s Bottom Ten Instant Noodles Of All Time 2017 Edition

The Ramen Rater's Bottom Ten Instant Noodles Of All Time 2017 Edition

So today it’s the fifth annual The Ramen Rater’s Bottom Ten Instant Noodles Of All Time. On my other lists, I exclude varieties that no longer are on the market. On this list, everything’s fair game for the bottom ten. As I say in the video presentation, if you like some of these, there’s nothing wrong with you – I just find these detestable personally. These are my least favorite varieties of the over 2400 varieties posted to date. Without gurther ado, the bottom ten.

The Ramen Rater’s Bottom Ten Instant Noodles Of All Time 2017 Edition

The full list video!

#10: Roland Ramen Japanese Style Quick-Cooking Alimentary Paste With Chicken Artificially Flavored Soup Base – United States

The Ramen Rater's Bottom Ten Instant Noodles Of All Time 2017 Edition

Honestly, I expected this to be a kind of ‘run-of-the-mill’ variety. I review based on the base product as well as the provided cooking directions. Well, they call for 3 cups of water and they’re violently bland. In the nutrition facts, they mention that this pack contains 3 servings! I’m guessing this is so they can say the sodium level is low? I’m unsure. What I’m sure of is that I really disliked these. Original review

#9 – Sichuan Guangyou Sweet Potato Instant Noodle Braised Spicy Chitterling Flavor – China

The Ramen Rater's Bottom Ten Instant Noodles Of All Time 2017 Edition

The sweet potato thread was alright, but very gloppy. The flavor was kind of brutal; indeed, too strong for me. I think the soup direction might have been better. What’s more, the powder sachet contents didn’t work well as the peas didn’t hydrate whatsoever. Original review

#8 – Maruchan Spicy Tomato Salsa Ramen – Japan

The Ramen Rater's Bottom Ten Instant Noodles Of All Time 2017 Edition

The noodles hydrated very nicely and have a standard flatness and thin character. The flavor was unfortunately something of a departure. It was a kind of spicy and putrid tomato melange – like homemade salsa left out overnight from binge drinking with a crew of chainsmokers – which just tastes like pure trainwreck. The bits of potato were interesting and hydrated well enough though – kind of liked that they had potato skins on. But yeah – this was just a fusion that should come undone. Original review

#7: Vedan Wei Wei A Instant Noodles Chicken Flavor – Taiwan

The Ramen Rater's Bottom Ten Instant Noodles Of All Time 2017 Edition

The noodles were very ho-hum. While they hydrated well, they seemed like they just didn’t belong in the ‘food’ group; spongy and riddled with sadness. As for chicken flavor, that was definitely absent. I was really happy about the vegetables, but they were mushy. Original review

#6 – Master Kong Artificial Abalone Crab Flavor Instant Noodle – China

The Ramen Rater's Bottom Ten Instant Noodles Of All Time 2017 Edition

The noodles were alright – plentiful too. Nothing to write home about. What is to write home about is the flavor. Write a warning letter home! I mean this was just plain funky; seemed initially like a crab stick kind of scent and essence but it just turned into this not food kind of taste that I just couldn’t stomach whatsoever. Couldn’t pour this down the drain fast enough. Original review

#5 – Koyo Reduced Sodium Garlic & Pepper Ramen – United States

The Ramen Rater's Bottom Ten Instant Noodles Of All Time 2017 Edition

The noodles are thick – more like ramyun. They have an alright chew; although they seem almost doughy- and not Hakata style ramen noodle doughy. The broth does taste of garlic and pepper, but it’s so very bland. It really is like you could boil some pepper and a clove of garlic and achieve the same results. Not at all to my liking. Original review

#4 – Urban Noodle Authentic Street Food Black Bean – United Kingdom

The Ramen Rater's Bottom Ten Instant Noodles Of All Time 2017 Edition

The noodles in this one were flat instead of round. They came out very nicely. The flavoring however was just strange. I expected maybe something of a Korean-Chinese fusion dish, but those are hearty and rich and not savory and sweet. In fact, this one was a little too sweet for me. The thinly sliced bamboo shoots don’t work for me either; leaving them whole would be nicer I think. What’s more, it has a kind of chemically aftertaste; like chlorine or soap. Original review

#3 – One Dish Asia Japanese Ramen Noodle – United States

The Ramen Rater's Bottom Ten Instant Noodles Of All Time 2017 Edition

This one comes with a fresh noodle pouch. They didn’t have a very fresh texture; more mushy. The bamboo shoots (which more resembled overcooked carrot and I had to consult the ingredients to figure what they were) were mushy as well. The broth had an acidic and a flavor reminiscent of the teriyaki flavor I’ve encountered in bad teriyaki instant flavors. A hot mess. Original review here

#2 – Baijia Single Noble Black Bone Chicken Flavor Instant Sweet Potato Noodles – China

The Ramen Rater's Bottom Ten Instant Noodles Of All Time 2017 Edition

I was told by a guy from the company that this indeed was believed to be medicinal and helpful to women having their ‘time of the month.’ I’m also been told by a reader that people generally don’t like black bone chicken soup even in China. Very slimy sweet potato noodles, thick, greasy broth and horrid veggies that didn’t hydrate well was just a flavor, texture, and complete food hole nightmare for me. This was just horrible stuff that I couldn’t stand. Original review

#1 – Dr. McDougall’s Vegan Pad Thai Noodle Soup – United States

Bottom Ten Instant Noodles Of All Time 2017 Edition

Wow – where do it begin. Well, first off when one in the United States thinks of Pad Thai, they think of what they might find at a domestic Thai restaurant. Okay so the rice noodles came out nicely – short, flat and broad and well hydrated. Now for the broth. Thin. Nothing like pad thai. Has a little lime taste and a kind of herbed taste. The floating bits of tofu are a lot like the marshmallows you get in the hot chocolate that comes with marshmallows. This is as far from pad thai as I can even express in words. It’s like someone gave a broken description of pad thai to someone who has short term memory problems and no taste buds a week prior and told them to make it. I kind of feel personally violated and offended. A new #1 on the Bottom Ten. Original review

Meet The Manufacturer: #2025: Urban Noodle Authentic Street Food Chow Mein

Today, we have the last of this Meet The Manufacturer. I’ve really enjoyed most of these quite a bit – I’ll say one thing – they’re not bland like some UK products I’ve had in the past! Today it’s chow mein – let’s give it a try!

Swtail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, empty contents of noodle pouch into box and separate with fork. Add in sauce sachet and close box back up. Microwave for 2 minutes at 650W (my microwave is 1100W with power levels of 1-10, so I’ll be using 6). Stir and enjoy!

The noodle pouch.

The liquid pouch – very large.

Some of the sauce with water chestnuts.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion, Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts and kizami shoga. The noodles came out nice, as did all of the noodles in the set. The flavor however was a kind of black vinegar and sugary sweet mix that just didn’t work for me. Now, this could be a British chow mein to a T, but for me it just didn’t work. However, the water chestnuts were absolutely wonderful. 2.0 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code number 5011673403000.

Best of British Cooking

A few reviews ago, I mentioned a British delicacy that I couldn’t remember the name of. It hit me though – it’s the munchie box; a smorgasbord of all the things a pizza joint will sell and a kind of appetizer tray in a pizza box – and it looks and sounds like amazingness. Here’s a guy eating a pretty big one.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2024: Urban Noodle Authentic Street Food Pad Thai

Okay so here we go. Pad Thai. In an instant and quick prep scenario, pad thai has gone through the ringer. I’ve had pad thai that comes this way be pretty decent, however many I’ve had taste like peanut butter and black vinegar with some chopped nuts on top. It’s not a real tricky one to translate to a processed food, but it seems a lot of the time that companies will draw on certain flavorings and try to mimic the flavor but end up with something completely different. Let’s hit up this one and see how it goes!

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, empty contents of noodle pouch into box and separate with fork. Add in sauce sachet and close box back up. Microwave for 2 minutes at 650W (my microwave is 1100W with power levels of 1-10, so I’ll be using 6). Stir and enjoy!

The noodle pouch.

The large sauce sachet.

Some of the huge sachet of sauce.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added coriander, extra large shrimp, Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts and crushed red pepper flakes. The noodles are flat and broad. They come out of the microwave nicely. The sauce has a flavor that is extremely sweet and has bits of what I believe to be carrot and definitely water chestnut. I would not call this pad thai, but more of a sweet and sour noodle. It’s actually quite good, but it’s poor resemblance to actual pad thai docks some score. Worth a try. 2.5 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 5011673403024.

Jamie Oliver’s Great Britain

A recipe for cooking authentic pad thai at home.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2023: Urban Noodle Authentic Street Food Black Bean

I’m a little curious on this one. See, Jjajang is really popular in China and South Korea; basically noodles with a black bean sauce. I’m curious as to if this is leaning in that direction, or whether it’s something on the Caribbean side; maybe a little citrus going on? Well, one way to find out – let’s crack it open and cook it up!

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, empty contents of noodle pouch into box and separate with fork. Add in sauce sachet and close box back up. Microwave for 2 minutes at 650W (my microwave is 1100W with power levels of 1-10, so I’ll be using 6). Stir and enjoy!

The noodle pouch.

The sauce sachet – very large.

Some of the sauce.

Finished (click to enlarge). The noodles in this one were flat instead of round. They came out very nicely. The flavoring however was just strange. I expected maybe something of a Korean-Chinese fusion dish, but those are hearty and rich and not savory and sweet. In fact, this one was a little too sweet for me. The thinly sliced bamboo shoots don’t work for me either; leaving them whole would be nicer I think. What’s more, it has a kind of chemically aftertaste; like chlorine or soap. 0.0 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 5011673403048.

Great British Cooking: A Well-kept Secret

[youtube url=https://youtu.be/IzcNjFqnrVg[Jamie Oliver shows some black bean cooking.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2022: Urban Noodle Authentic Street Food Thai Red Curry

This sounds like a good one! Red curry i sone I thoroughly enjoy; although I can’t think of a curry I’ve met that I’ve not enjoyed. When I think of curry and the UK, my thoughts immediately wander towards Red Dwarf episodes with Rimmer complaining about Lister reeking of last night’s vindaloo and stale lager. It also wanders to something I saw a couple years ago – in Britain, you can get takeaway boxes full of fried odd and ends – it looks like pure gut bomb amazingness. But I digress – red curry sounds good – let’s dig in!

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, empty contents of noodle pouch into box and separate with fork. Add in sauce sachet and close box back up. Microwave for 2 minutes at 650W (my microwave is 1100W with power levels of 1-10, so I’ll be using 6). Stir and enjoy!

The noodle pouch.

The large sauce sachet.

A thick liquid with a nice scent.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion, crushed red pepper, coriander and Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts. The noodles were nice – decent chewiness and thickness. The flavor on this one was a slightly spicy and acidic curry. Long thin strips of bamboo shoots were abundant as well. 3.0 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 501167340301.

Traditional Old English (British) Recipes (Traditional Old English Recipes) (Volume 1)

Some short introductions to some neat British street food trucks.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2021: Urban Noodle Authentic Street Food Satay

To kick things off, we have the Satay variety. Satay is hugely popular, but I have a feeling most people don’t know the whole story – here’s what Wikipedia has to say about Satay:

Satay (/ˈsæt/, /ˈsɑːt/ sah-tay), modern Indonesian and Malay spelling of sate, is a dish of seasoned, skewered and grilled meat, served with a sauce.[1] Satay may consist of diced or sliced chicken, goat, mutton, beef,pork, fish, other meats, or tofu; the more authentic version uses skewers from the midrib of the coconut palm frond, although bamboo skewers are often used. These are grilled or barbecued over a wood or charcoal fire, then served with various spicy seasonings.

Satay originated in Java, Indonesia.[2][3][4] It is available almost anywhere in Indonesia, where it has become a national dish.[5][6] It is also popular in many other Southeast Asian countries, including Malaysia, Singapore,Brunei, Thailand, the Philippines, as well as in Suriname and the Netherlands, as Indonesia and Suriname are former Dutch colonies.

Satay is a very popular delicacy in Indonesia; the country’s diverse ethnic groups’ culinary arts (see Indonesian cuisine) have produced a wide variety of satays. In Indonesia, satay can be obtained from a travelling satay vendor, from a street-side tent-restaurant, in an upper-class restaurant, or during traditional celebration feasts. In Malaysia, satay is a popular dish—especially during celebrations—and can be found throughout the country. In Southern Philippines it is known as satti.

Close analogues are yakitori from Japan, shish kebab from Turkey and the Middle East, shashlik from the Caucasus, chuanr from China, and sosatie from South Africa. It is listed at number 14 on World’s 50 most delicious foods readers’ poll complied by CNN Go in 2011.[7]

Alright – let’s delve into this, the first of five different varieties I’ll be reviewing for this Meet The Manufacturer.

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, empty noodle pouch into box and separate with a fork. Add sauce sachet contents, close box back up and microwave at 650W for 2 minutes (I have an 1100W microwave with power settings of 1-10 so going to use 6). Stir and enjoy!

The noodle pouch.

The sauce sachet.

A thick liquid with a pleasing scent.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts and spring onion. The noodles had a great chew and gauge to them. Not rubbery from the microwaving, either. The flavor was really great – a nice bit of peanut and a rich satay taste. The omnipresence of baby corn was not only nice, it went perfectly and they were of excellent quality. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 5011673403017.

British Food: An Extraordinary Thousand Years of History

A film showing street food in London’s Greenwich Market.

Meet The Manufacturer: Product Samples From Urban Noodle

Behold! The postman comes bearing gifts! Let’s see what’s inside, shall we?

All five varieties of Urban Noodle (click to enlarge)! I think this will be a fun Meet The Manufacturer!

Wait, shortbread cookies? Well, Steve (the fellow who sent them along) used to be a head honcho at Walker’s Shortbread and sent some along! Thanks! Can’t wait to try these great looking noodles (and have some cookies for dessert)!

Meet The Manufacturer: Interview With Urban Noodle

Interview With Urban Noodle * Product Samples From Urban NoodleUrban Noodle Authentic Street Food SatayUrban Noodle Authentic Street Food Thai Red CurryUrban Noodle Authentic Street Food Black BeanUrban Noodle Authentic Street Food Pad Thai * Urban Noodle Authentic Street Food Chow Mein

As it always works, I got an email from someone asking if I’d like to try their noodles. These are a little different though – they’re from the UK, however they’re made in Thailand. Not only that, they’re microwavable – in fact, I think that’s the only way they can be prepared. Let’s find out a little more about this unique line of noodles from Ginette Monkcom, Commercial Executive from Petty, Wood & Co. Ltd. of the UK.

 

THE RAMEN RATER> Can you start by telling me a little bit about the history of Urban Noodle – how did you start?
URBAN NOODLE> Well, Asian food was becoming popular in the UK – many Brits go on vacation in Thailand and Bali – and the street food phenomenon was getting a lot of attention, with food trucks popping up everywhere in London, so we decided that the time was right for a new brand.
We felt like the authentic taste of street food wasn’t available in the traditional dry noodle pots which are available over here, we craved soft noodles and a proper sauce. Urban Noodle was launched last year and has been selling successfully ever since, having become a really popular lunch choice for everyone in the office.
By the way, “we” are Petty Wood Ltd, a company that selects fine foods from across the world and imports them into the UK. Urban Noodle is one of the brands we own.

TRR> For my readers who aren’t familiar with your products, can you tell a little about them?

URBAN NOODLE> We have five noodle-based meals/snacks, in Chinese-takeout style containers. The noodles are soft, not dried, and you just have to mix the noodles and sauce in the container, zap them in the microwave for 2 minutes, and you’re done.
The types are: Satay, Pad Thai, Thai Red Curry, Black Bean, and Chow Mein.

TRR> Your noodles come in a takeout box design; why?

URBAN NOODLE> Convenience, mainly; but also what Urban Noodle offers is different, it’s authentic, and we wanted to represent that with our design. Not to mention they are eye-catching on a supermarket shelf and they’re easy to store in your home or office cupboard.

TRR> Do you produce products other than noodles?

URBAN NOODLE> No, just these 5 items under the Urban Noodle brand, but Petty Wood markets a host of other brands, from tea to candy, some we own and some we distribute on behalf of their manufacturers.

TRR> How do you noodle products differ from those by other manufacturers?

URBAN NOODLE> Urban Noodle items are lower in salt and fat than competing products, and have cleaner ingredient listings. And we worked hard to ensure the recipes and flavors are more authentic.

TRR> Can your products be purchased outside of the UK?

URBAN NOODLE> Not yet, but we’re actively looking at the US market. There are some similar products sold in the US, but we believe ours are superior.

TRR> Where do you make your noodles?

URBAN NOODLE> All the varieties are made in Thailand, in a BRC-accredited production facility.

TRR> What was your first product?

URBAN NOODLE> The full Urban Noodle range was introduced at the same time.
Petty Wood however, has been running as a successful business for 200 years, launching the Epicure brand in 1891.

TRR> Are you involved in the local community/charity?

URBAN NOODLE> Every year Petty Wood employees vote for two charities to support throughout the coming year; one local and one national charity. This year we are proud to be supporting Hampshire & The Isle Of Wight’s Air Ambulance and Alzheimer’s Society.

TRR> How many of your unique noodles do you produce every year?

URBAN NOODLE> In our first year of trading we produced thousands of Urban Noodle pots, and since then our orders haven’t stopped coming.

TRR> Have you ever thought about varieties like macaroni and cheese or pizza flavored noodles?

URBAN NOODLE> Well…. Great ideas…. If we come across a street vendor in Bangkok or Jakarta selling macaroni & cheese noodles or pizza noodles, then we will come up with an equivalent!

TRR> Which is your personal favorite variety of Urban Noodle and what (if anything) do you add to them?

URBAN NOODLE> Mine is the Satay: the sauce is very peanutty (if that’s a word) and has little baby corns in it. A meal in itself. A second favorite is the Thai Red Curry: I have tried adding chicken to that, which is so easy to do and gives it that little bit extra.

TRR> You’re located in the UK – can you tell us a little about life where your company is located – local highlights and the like?

URBAN NOODLE> We’re in Andover, a town in the county of Hampshire, about 60 miles southwest of London. It was founded by Celts over 1,000 years ago: Andover was mentioned in the Domesday Book in 1086. It’s surrounded by beautiful countryside, and also hosts the Head Quarters for the British Army. Andover a great place in which to live and work.

TRR> Why the name Urban Noodle?

URBAN NOODLE> It’s a great name, isn’t it? (It’s trademarked by the way.) It means exactly what it suggests: city food, quick convenient, high quality.

TRR> Are there any new products on the way from Urban Noodle? Can you give my readers a ‘sneak peek?’

URBAN NOODLE> We are dedicating our focus to the current range of Urban Noodle right now but are looking at other flavors we might extend the range with in the future.

THE RAMEN RATER> Thank you very much for this opportunity! I and my readers appreciate it!

 

With that, let’s start Meet The Manufacturer! I want to thank Steve Dawson for reaching out about this product line, and Ginette Monkcom for the interview!