Tag Archives: nong shim

#3094: Nongshim Oolong Men Beef – United States

#3094: Nongshim Oolong Men Beef - United States

Found this one up in Canada. Nongshim products in Canada are interesting because unlike in the United States where you can find ones made here as well as from South Korea, Canada also has products that come from the Chinese Nongshim factory. That’s a lot of sources for one brand! Let’s check it out!

Nongshim Oolong Men Beef – United States

#3094: Nongshim Oolong Men Beef - United States

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, I’m going to go with the microwave instructions. First, completely remove the lid. Add sachet content and room temp water to fill line. Microwave at 1000W for 3 minutes. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#3094: Nongshim Oolong Men Beef - United States

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#3094: Nongshim Oolong Men Beef - United States

The noodle block.

#3094: Nongshim Oolong Men Beef - United States

A dry sachet.

#3094: Nongshim Oolong Men Beef - United States

A granular mixture.

#3094: Nongshim Oolong Men Beef - United States

Loose vegetable from the cup.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added boiled beef, fried garlic, soft egg, and green onion. The noodles came out of the microwave piping hot and most certainly done. The doneness of them was very much acceptable given their microwave ride and enjoyable. The broth had an initial beef taste that gave way to a mushroom flavor. Included garnish included mushroom which sadly did not hydrate and was like chewing a piece of wood. 2.0 out of 5.0 stars.  UPC bar code 031146271245.

#3094: Nongshim Oolong Men Beef - United States

NongShim Shin Ramyun Noodle Soup, Gourmet Spicy, 4.2 Ounce (Pack of 20)

Watch me cook on Instant Noodle Recipe Time!

The Ramen Rater’s Top Ten South Korean Instant Noodles Of All Time 2016 Edition

South Korea has the highest per person consumption of instant noodles in the world. It’s not a surprise that their instant noodle are quite good – usually the noodles (known as ramyun) are thicker and accompanied by a spicy broth. These are my very favorite varieties of South Korean instant noodles – hope you enjoy!

#10: Paldo Kko Kko Myun

This one is like a bowl of candy to me. We start with nice quality noodles, and then the broth takes over. The broth has a kind of chicken and jalapeno flavor to it. The flavors play off of each other quite nicely and deliver both a strong bite as well as a mellow comfort food flavor in one bowl. The vegetable packet includes little chicken pieces. Original review

#9: Paldo Jjamppong Seafood Noodle King Bowl

Thick and chewy ramyun noodles are augmented by a broth with a good consistency – a little thickness was very good. Also a slightly sweet, seafood and spicy flavor to it I thoroughly enjoyed. Original review here

#8: Samyang Foods Red Nagasaki Jjampong

The noodles are perfect – what I like to find in ramyun! Thick and chewy. The broth is amazing – an excellent level of heat balanced with a respectable amount of seafood flavor. The added vegetable pieces hydrated quite well. Top notch! Original review

#7: Paldo King Bowl Super Spicy Pan Stirfried Noodle

The noodles are of a good ramyun gauge – lots of them as well. The flavor is a kind of seafood and spicy thing and there’s a sweetness going on as well. The supplied vegetables did great – this was an amazingly good stir noodle! Original review

#6: Nongshim Soon Veggie Noodle Soup

This is the first instant noodle on the top ten to be marketed towards vegetarians. What surprised me about it was the broth had such a full flavor to it; deep and satisfying. The noodles are slightly larger in gauge than your run of the mill instant, which is common of South Korean ‘ramyun.’ Magnificent stuff! Original review

#5: Nongshim Zha Wang (Jjawang) Noodles With Chajang Sauce

The noodles are out of this world – soft and chewy, with a nice width and thickness – very hearty. The sauce coats everything and there’s more than enough of it. It has a rich black bean flavor augmented with peas, cabbage and other veggies. This is the best jjajang I’ve ever tried. Original review

#4: Paldo Cheese Noodle

These noodles – wow. I think the best addition to South Korean ramyun has to be cheese. Well, not only is cheese included here but it’s got just the perfect notes of spiciness and strong, rich flavor. The little guy with the sign that says cheese noodle rocks as well. Original review

#3: Paldo Rabokki Noodle

The noodles plumped up just perfectly – thick and a good chew. The broth is more of a sauce and it’s very rich – spicy and sweet – like an adult version of Spaghetti-O’s which I find delectable. Original review

#2: Nongshim Jinjja Jinjja

The noodles are very good – nice thick ramyun. The broth has a seriously spicy kick to it and a very peanut aroma with pork notes. The vegetables hydrated very well. Back with a vengeance! Original review

#1: ChoripDong Hurricane Rice Cake

It’s red. It’s got a thick spicy and sweet sauce. It’s got ramyun. It’s got topokki. This was a real find – Just looking at the picture makes me want some right this instant. The most wonderful big bowl of noodles I’ve ever had. Original review here

#1678: Nongshim Shin Black Spicy Pot-Au-Feu Flavor (New Edition)

It’s been a long time since I’ve reviewed Nongshim Shin Black – and it’s gotten a packaging facelift. This is made here in the USA in Rancho Cucamonga, California! This is the ‘flagship’ of their new line of ‘Black Class Noodle Soup’ varieties. This one’s got neww clothes – but is it still the same underneath? Let’s have a look at this dressed up pack of Nongshim Shin Black noodles!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Contains  beef. To prepare, boil 550ml water and add contents of package. Cook 4-5 minutes (I’ll be doing 4.5 minutes), stirring occasionally. Enjoy!

The noodle block.

The spicy soup base sachet.

Has a spicy scent.

A sul-long-tang soup base sachet.

Has a very nice garlic and beef scent.

The vegetables sachet/.

A nice mix!

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added beef, egg, spring onion and mung bean sprouts. The noodles are thick and chewy as ramyun always should be. There'[s a lot of them and they are very good. The broth is a strong beef and garlic affair with a good hit of spiciness to it. What I really liked are the vegetables – mushrooms are present as well as a ton of sliced garlic – which hydrates to a crisp fresh pinnacle of yumminess. A great bowl of ramyun! 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 031146013524.

Nongshim Shin Black Noodle Soup, 4.58 Ounce Packages (Pack of 18)

A TV spot for Nongshim Shin Black.

#1308: Nongshim Soon Veggie Noodle Soup

Here’s a new one from Nongshim for the vegetable crown. At first, I thought it would be a tofu based variety; the reason was that I’ve gone to a local Korean restaurant and ordered ‘Soon Tofu’ a few times, which is a spicy soup with tofu in it. Well, ‘soon’ translates to ‘soft.’ Well, tofu is a vegetarian friendly construct, so I thought I’d give it a try today with this new one. A few people have been asking about this one, so with that, let’s check it out.

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). This is Vegan friendly. To prepare, boil 500ml water and add noodles and sachet contents. Cook for 4 – 5 minutes stirring every once in a while. Eat!

The noodle block.

Soup base sachet.

A light powder with a nice scent.

The vegetable sachet.

A colorful mix.

Prep, prep, prep… We hit the local Boo Han Market nearby for vegetables last night. All sorts of things I’d never seen before – green onions the size of leeks! Huge bags of peeled garlic! Something called Gobo that looked like a spear for impaling someone! I also was hunting for tofu and found this extra firm ‘tofu cutlet’ which looked pretty good.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added enormous green onion, sweet onion, Fresno pepper, white mushroom, baby bok choy and fried tofu cutlet. The noodles are perfect – nice ramyun gauge and texture I enjoy thoroughly. The broth is very good – especially for a vegetarian skewed variety. Usually I find anything vegetarian to have this, well, funk to it. This doesn’t have that. It’s very reminiscent of Shin Ramyun, yet a little less spicy. Add to it the fact that it isn’t as heavy; while the broth is very rich and tastes very good, it seems somewhat fresher and light. The hydrated veggies did pretty well. All in all, I’m quite impressed – best Vegan instant ever. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 031146022823.

I’m not sure what they’re conversing about, but it’s pretty interesting!

Product Samples From Nongshim USA!

Yesterday I saw the FedEx truck coming around the corner through the patio door window. They stopped. What’s nice is that the guy just parks and comes up to the window these days. Let’s see what inside!

Hey rad! So these are two new ones for sale in the US that are made in South Korea. On the left is the Soon Veggie Ramyun – vegan friendly ramyun. On the right, they’ve brought back the Garlic Teriyaki Udon! Sweet! Really looking forward to trying these brand new products that will be able to be got here in the US. Thank you very much!

A Nice Gift From Nongshim America

Got a box from Nongshim America today. They were stoked on the story that came out about my ramyun burger recipe. Thank you very much! Let’s see what’s inside!

Temporary tattoos!

A fan!

Neat chef hats!

They also sent a couple shirts – here are the front and back.

Finally, a big box of Shin Ramyun Black! Wow! Thank you very much!

#1187: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Cup (South Korean version)

Here we have a Shin Ramyun cup – this one was bought in South Korea and brought back to me by Kristen W. or Arizona – thanks! Let’s check it out!

Here are the side panels (click image to enlarge). The version sold in the US contains beef, so I am assuming this one does as well.

The noodle block.

Soup base sachet.

Spicy and smells good.

Some bits of veg from the bottom of the cup.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added green onions and processed cheese. The noodles were pretty good – a little spongy. The broth was excellent though – nice spicy and rich flavor. 3.5 out of 5.0 stars.UPC bar code 8801043015714.

[AMAZONPRODUCTS asin=”B000LQNK6E”]Here is the US version – looks to be about the same. [/AMAZONPRODUCTS]

My son really likes Minecraft – I’ll have to show him this!

#1178: Nongshim Shin Black Spicy Pot-au-feu Flavor Premium Noodle Soup

You might be thinking, ‘hey – didn’t he already review this?’ Nope – I reviewed the Shin Ramyun Black cup from South Korea. This is the one that is manufactured here in the United States in Rancho Cucamonga, California.So what is this ‘Pot-au-feu’ flavor? I consulted Wikipedia and found this:

Pot-au-feu (French pronunciation: ​[pɔ.to.fø] “pot on the fire”) is a French beef stew. According to chefRaymond Blanc, pot-au-feu is “the quintessence of French family cuisine, it is the most celebrated dish in France. It honours the tables of the rich and poor alike.”[1]

The cuts of beef and the vegetables involved vary, but a typical pot-au-feu contains:

Cooking cartilaginous meat in the stew will result in gelatin being dissolved into the broth. If the stew is allowed to cool, the broth may turn into a jelly, resulting in an interesting texture. Allowing the stew to cool also allows the removal of excess fat, which floats on the surface and solidifies.

The dish is often served with coarse salt and strong Dijonmustard, and sometimes also with gherkins pickled in vinegar.

Pot-au-feu broth may be used as a soup (often enriched with rice, pasta or toasted bread), as a base for sauces, or for cooking vegetables or pasta. Ready-to-use concentrated cubes are available to make what purports to be pot-au-feu broth when water is added.

Pot-au-feu could be a continuous affair in the past, with new ingredients added as some is used; nowadays houses do not have a permanent fire in cold weather, and the dish is cooked for a specific meal. Many countries have similar dishes with local ingredients.

A fiery pot of noodles! Very nice. Let’s have a look!

Here’s the lid (click image to enlarge). Notice the French? I got this one in Vancouver, BC from T&T Supermarket.

Here are the side panels (click image to enlarge). Contains beef.

The noodle block.

The spicy soup base sachet.

Has a nice color and spicy scent.

A second soup base sachet. What is Sul-Long-Tang? Again, I consult Wikipedia:

Seolleongtang is a Korean broth tang (soup) made from ox bones (mostly leg bones), brisket and other cuts. Seasoning is generally done at the table according to personal taste by adding salt, ground black pepper, red pepper, minced garlic, or chopped spring onions. It is a local dish of Seoul.[1]

Seolleongtang is typically simmered over a low flame over a period of several hours to an entire day, to allow the flavor to be gradually extracted from the bones. It has a milky off-white, cloudy appearance and is normally eaten together with rice and several side dishes; the rice is sometimes added directly to the soup.[2]

Very light color and a garlicky scent.

Here are the larger pieces I got out of the cup (they aren’t contained in a sachet). Big pieces of mushroom and green onion.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added egg, Walla Walla sweet onion and beef I sauteed with qa little garlic salt. The noodles are really quite good for a cup version. They are wide and have a nice texture and quality. The broth is excellent. It’s spicy, but not so spicy that it makes you run for something to drink (if you can’t handle the heat, slap a couple sliced of processed cheese on top of and stir it in – it’s really good that way). What’s nice about that is that you can also taste the nice flavor of beef and garlic. Finally, the included veggies are good too – they hydrate very well. Most notably, the mushrooms do really well and have a nice flavor. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 031146021857.

[AMAZONPRODUCTS asin=”B00BEIKRBY”]

Here’s an awesome video about how they make the Shin Black Cup!

This is a great video about the plant tours at Nongshim America. The gentleman who gives the tour in the video gave me and my wife the same tour in May of 2012! At 2m37s you can see a picture of us on the wall from our day at Nongshim America! If you can get down there and do a plant tour, you’ll be greeted by some of the nicest people I’ve had the fortune to meet and have a really fun time! You can find out more about the plant tours here.

A Nice Gift From Nongshim America

 

Got a nice and hefty box in the mail!

Nongshim America sent three of my favorites (they all made the Top Ten USA list) as a thank you for recognizing their products worthy of being in the list! Thanks! Think I’ll attempt a Shin Black Ramyun Burger for Labor Day!

A Nice Surprise From Nongshim America!

Was looking at my posts and found this on that I hadn’t posted for some reason – check it out – it’s from 2013

When we got home from the hospital yesterday, I called the apartment office to see if there were any packages – they said there was one. A mailer from Nongshim America – what’s inside?

There were a couple of sheets of stickers… I immediately put them in one of my noodle binders (yes, I have binders full of instant noodle stuff – mostly the lids and empty packaging).

Holy cow! Two sheets of special postage stamps with PSY and Shin Black Cups! Thank you! What’s funny is that when I was very young, I collected stamps, and then my mother took that over once I lost interest. So one sheet will stay in the binder and one will go to my mom. Thanks to Ray A., Hannah C. and all the great folks down in Rancho Cucamonga at Nongshim America – miss you guys!

#1105: Nongshim Doong Ji Authentic Korean Cold Noodles With Chili Sauce

Here’s one that I’ve waiting to review for a while. This is a variety specifically marketed for the summer months – cold South Korean noodles! Thought I’d consult Wikipedia to give some more information on South Korean cold noodle dishes:

Bibim guksu, a cold dish made with very thin wheat flour noodles called somyeon with added flavorings, is one of the most popular traditional noodle dishes in Korean cuisine. It is also called guksu bibim or goldong myeon, all of which literally mean “stirred noodles” or “mixed noodles”. [1] The dish is especially popular during summer.

There are many kinds of cold noodle dishes in Korea, including one made with cold beef broth; however, spicy cold noodles have historically been appreciated by spice-loving people in Korea and recognized internationally. What makes this dish so distinct from other cold noodle dishes from different cultures is the strong spicy flavor produced from the combination of red pepper powder, gochujang, and minced garlic, along with a sweet-and-sour flavor created by vinegar and sugar. Most spicy cold noodles are prepared with haszing duu and a slight touch of sesame oil to enhance the richness of its flavor.

Typically the dish would be prepared by stir frying diced beef, julienned pickled cucumbers, and mushrooms in sesame oil, which is all mixed together with the cooked noodles, soy sauce, sesame oil, sesame seeds and sugar. Garnishes placed on top and around the spicy noodles include hard-boiled eggs, pickled mu, dried gim strips, sliced cucumbers, and sometimes sliced Korean pear or tomato.[1][2]

Sounds like something that’d be great today – supposed to be pretty warm! Let’s give it a try.

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Contains wheat, soybean and pollock.

Buckwheat gives these noodles their dark brown color. Usually when you order naengmyeon, another cold noodle dish, it is served at a restaurant with a pair of scissors to cut the noodles into manageable lengths – works well here as well.

The veggies and solid ingredients.

The larger bits are the Korean pear.

The chili sauce packet.

Nice color and a spicy scent.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added green onion, hard boiled egg, roast beef and a little sliced kimchi on the side. The noodles are nice – they have a chewiness you can only get from buckwheat and chillling them makes their texture tighten up – only words I can think to describe. The flavoring is great – spicy and slightly sweet – and there more than enough of the sauce to coat all the noodles. The pear is great too – chewy and flavorful. All in all quite nice! 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 031146158164.

#1044: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Noodle Spicy Mushroom Flavour

Another from my trip to Canada for my birthday. Wow – what a past two days here! The Top Ten 2013 list came out to a clamor of Taiwanese disapproval – Taiwan didn’t make the list. But, hopefully out of it all I’ll get contacted by one of the companies in Taiwan, but so far nothing. On to other things though – that being this interesting bowl by Nongshim. This one’s made in Shanghai, China. Let’s check it out.

Very red side panels (click to enlarge).

Hey look – an included fork! A new one, too!

The noodle block.

The seasoning powder packet.

Nice and red like one would expect!

No veggie packet – this is what was in the bottom of the bowl.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added cheese, green onion, sweet onion, and sauteed beef with some mushrooms, Worcestershire sauce, and garlic. The noodles were a little disappointing – had some songiness I didn’t enjoy. The quantity was good though. The broth seemed a little on the weaker side and didn’t have the ‘oomph’ that I would have expected from Shin Ramyun. Not to say it wasn’t tasty – has a nice red broth flavor as I would expect from Shin Ramyun, just not very fiery in the spiciness department. The veggies hydrated nicely and were alright. 3.25 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 6920238083016.

Making of video for Nongshim CF by T-Ara.