Tag Archives: kitsune

#2799: Maruchan Kitsune Soba

#2799: Maruchan Kitsune Soba

Here’s another neat one from Zenpop.JP. Thank you! So Zenpop has all sorts of monthly boxes including ramen boxes. Nine instant ramen in one box for a good price – check ’em out! Here’s what they had to say about this one –

Kitsune means ‘fox’ in Japanese and Kitsune soba is topped with fried tofu, which according to folklore, fox spirits are fond of. Since this product is made to sell in the Kanto area, where Tokyo in included, the soup has a stronger flavor of shoyu compared to the Kansai one.

sounds good to me – let’s crack it open

Maruchan Kitsune Soba – Japan

#2799: Maruchan Kitsune Soba

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains pork and fish. To prepare, add everything to the bowl and boiling water to line. Cover for 3 minutes. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2799: Maruchan Kitsune Soba

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2799: Maruchan Kitsune Soba

The noodle block.

#2799: Maruchan Kitsune Soba

The kitsune!

#2799: Maruchan Kitsune Soba

Loose bits from the bowl.

#2799: Maruchan Kitsune Soba

The soup base sachet.

#2799: Maruchan Kitsune Soba

Lots of powder.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts and shichimi togarashi. Noodles had a kind of chew that seemed like they would do so much better dry than in soup. The broth was so salty and strong that it was just kind of gross to me. The saving grace of the kitsune was the only thing keeping this from the stripey hole. 0.25 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4901990529211.

#2799: Maruchan Kitsune Soba

Maruchan Aka Kitsune Udon Cup, 3.39-Ounce Units (Pack of 12)

An older Maruchan TV spot

#2717: Maruchan Umaitsuyu Kitsune Udon

#2717: Maruchan Umaitsuyu Kitsune Udon - Japan - zenpop zenpop.jp www.zenpop.jp

Today we have a Zenpop.JP variety – so what’s Zenpop? They’re a subscription service for all things Japanese! Definitely, check them out. By the way, use coupon code RAMENRATER to get $2 off! Here’s what they had to say about this one –

“The low sodium soup contains soft udon noodles and deep fried sweet tofu. It won the gold prize at the JSH Low Sodium Food Award in 2017. It’s a healthy and tasty version of the classic Japanese dish! Add the bag of flavor magic after the noodles cook for 3 min.”

Here’s some info on kitsune udon from Wikipedia as well –

Kitsune udon: “Fox udon”. Topped with aburaage (sweetened deep-fried tofu pockets). This originated in Osaka.

Alright – let’s have a look at this low-sodium variety from Japan!

Maruchan Umaitsuyu Kitsune Udon – Japan

#2717: Maruchan Umaitsuyu Kitsune Udon - Japan - zenpop zenpop.jp www.zenpop.jp

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains fish. To prepare, add boiling water to fill line and cover for 3 minutes. Add the liquid sachet. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2717: Maruchan Umaitsuyu Kitsune Udon - Japan - zenpop zenpop.jp www.zenpop.jp

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2717: Maruchan Umaitsuyu Kitsune Udon - Japan - zenpop zenpop.jp www.zenpop.jp

The noodle block.

#2717: Maruchan Umaitsuyu Kitsune Udon - Japan - zenpop zenpop.jp www.zenpop.jp

Loose bits of garnish and seasoning from the cup.

#2717: Maruchan Umaitsuyu Kitsune Udon - Japan - zenpop zenpop.jp www.zenpop.jp

The liquid seasoning sachet.

#2717: Maruchan Umaitsuyu Kitsune Udon - Japan - zenpop zenpop.jp www.zenpop.jp

Almost looks a little reddish.

Finished (click to enlarge). Noodles are broad and soft. Lots of garnish in this one – kamaboko, fried tofu pieces that are everywhere. Some other stuff as well. Pretty good. 3.5 out of 5.0 stars.  JAN bar code 4901990336314.

#2717: Maruchan Umaitsuyu Kitsune Udon - Japan - zenpop zenpop.jp www.zenpop.jp

Maruchan Aka Kitsune U d o n  Cup, 3.39-Ounce Units (Pack of 12)

Let’s have unboxing time!

#2598: Myojo Western Style Kitsune Udon

#2598: Myojo Western Style Kitsune Udon - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

This one was sent by Javier over at Box From Japan. Box From Japan is a subscription service and every month, you get 4 great new instant ramen bowls from Japan! Definitely worth a look! This one, of course, is from Japan and is kitsune udon! What’s that? Here’s a little from Wikipedia –

Udon (饂飩, usually written as うどん) is a type of thick wheat flour noodle of Japanese cuisine. Udon is often served hot as a noodle soup in its simplest form, as kake udon, in a mildly flavoured broth called kakejiru, which is made of dashisoy sauce, and mirin. It is usually topped with thinly chopped scallions. Other common toppings include tempura, often prawn or kakiage (a type of mixed tempura fritter), or aburaage, a type of deep-fried tofupockets seasoned with sugar, mirin, and soy sauce. A thin slice of kamaboko, a halfmoon-shaped fish cake, is often added. Shichimi can be added to taste.

The flavor of broth and topping vary from region to region. Usually, dark brown broth, made from dark soy sauce (koikuchi shōyu), is used in eastern Japan, and light brown broth, made from light soy sauce (usukuchi shōyu), is used in western Japan. This is even noticeable in packaged instant noodles, which are often sold in two different versions for east and west.

Kitsune udon: “Fox udon”. Topped with aburaage (sweetened deep-fried tofu pockets). This originated in Osaka.

Alrighty! Let’s check out this kistune udon.

Myojo Western Style Kitsune Udon – Japan

#2598: Myojo Western Style Kitsune Udon - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains fish. To prepare, add in sachet contents and boiling water to fill line. Cover for 5 minutes. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2598: Myojo Western Style Kitsune Udon - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2598: Myojo Western Style Kitsune Udon - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The noodle block.

#2598: Myojo Western Style Kitsune Udon - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The powder base sachet.

#2598: Myojo Western Style Kitsune Udon - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Light and fluffy.

#2598: Myojo Western Style Kitsune Udon - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The fried tofu – a big block of it.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion and shichimi togarashi. The udon hydrated well. I generally like my udon with a little more backbone and of the round style, but these flat soft ones did the trick very nicely. The broth has a light taste to it not jockeying for flavor over the tofu, which was soft and supple with a very good sweetness and flavor. 4.0 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4902881429566.

#2598: Myojo Western Style Kitsune Udon - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Myojo Tonkotsu Noodles, Creamy, 7.37 Ounce

How to make beef udon

#2415: Nissin Kitsune Udon Donbei (West)

#2415: Nissin Kitsune Udon Donbei (West) - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodle

I’m happy to say that I got an email from Javier over at Box From Japan telling me that they’re back! They offer s subscription service – instant ramen bowls direct from Japan! You get 4 bowls every month! It’s pretty neat – should go check it out!

Today, we have a bowl from Nissin Japan – Kitsune udon. Let’s ask Wikipedia about it:

Udon (饂飩?, usually written as うどん) is a type of thick wheat flournoodle of Japanese cuisine. Udon is often served hot as a noodle soup in its simplest form, as kake udon, in a mildly flavoured broth called kakejiru, which is made of dashi, soy sauce, and mirin. It is usually with thin scallions. Other common toppings include tempura, often prawn or kakiage (a type of mixed tempura fritter), or aburaage, a type of deep-fried tofu pockets seasoned with sugar, mirin, and soy sauce. A thin slice of kamaboko, a halfmoon-shaped fish cake, is often added. Shichimi can be added to taste.

The flavor of broth and topping vary from region to region. Usually, dark brown broth, made from dark soy sauce (koikuchi shōyu), is used in eastern Japan, and light brown broth, made from light soy sauce (usukuchi shōyu), is used in western Japan. This is even noticeable in packaged instant noodles, which are often sold in two different versions for east and west.

Kitsune udon: “Fox udon”. Topped with aburaage (sweetened deep-fried tofu pockets). This originated in Osaka.

This is a pretty popular variety in Japan. Indeed, this is a long-lived series of products. So let’s check out Nissin’s Kitsune Udon – West-style!

Nissin Kitsune Udon Donbei (West) – Japan

#2415: Nissin Kitsune Udon Donbei (West) - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodle

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains fish. To prepare, add sachet contents and 410ml boiling water to the bowl and cover for 5 minutes. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2415: Nissin Kitsune Udon Donbei (West) - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodle

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2415: Nissin Kitsune Udon Donbei (West) - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodle

The udon noodle block.

#2415: Nissin Kitsune Udon Donbei (West) - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodle

A dual sachet.

#2415: Nissin Kitsune Udon Donbei (West) - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodle

The powder soup base.

#2415: Nissin Kitsune Udon Donbei (West) - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodle

Shichimi togarashi – a peppery melange.

#2415: Nissin Kitsune Udon Donbei (West) - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodle

Finally, the kitusne – sweet fried tofu.

Finished (click to enlarge). The noodles sucked up a lot of liquid and were of great quanlity and character. They’re broad and very thick but flatter than other udon you might find in the refrigerated section. The broth is light and a little sweet with notes of fish. The kitsune (fried tofu) was sweet and soft. Indeed, I’ve found it to remind me of a big rectangular tongue. It’s good and compliments the soup and noodles perfectly. The little sprinkle of shichimi togarashi was nice. I can see why this is a popular bowl in Japan. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.  JAN bar code 4902105002674.

Nissin Donbei Kitsune U d o n, Instant Japanese Udon Noodle with Fried Tofu, Strong Taste, 3.4oz X 6 bowls (For 6 Servings)[japan Import]

A Nissin TV advertisement.

#2359: Daikoku Kitsune Udon

#2359: Daikoku Kitsune Udon - Japan - The Ramen Rater - うどん

Animal noodles! Animal noodles? Yup – animal noodles. That’s at least what I used to call these – there are two of them very popular in Japan – kitsune uson and tanuki soba. Kitsune refers to a fox and has fried tofu with it. Tanuki soba usually has either a round disc of tempura or little bits of it. Here’s a little more info from Wikipedia –

Udon (饂飩?, usually written as うどん) is a type of thick wheat flour noodle of Japanese cuisine. Udon is often served hot as a noodle soup in its simplest form, as kake udon, in a mildly flavoured broth called kakejiru, which is made of dashi, soy sauce, and mirin. It is usually topped with thinly chopped scallions. Other common toppings include tempura, often prawn or kakiage (a type of mixed tempura fritter), or aburaage, a type of deep-fried tofu pockets seasoned with sugar, mirin, and soy sauce. A thin slice of kamaboko, a halfmoon-shape fish cake, is often a garnish.

The flavor of broth and topping vary from region to region. Usually, dark brown broth, made from dark soy sauce (koikuchi shōyu), is used in eastern Japan, and light brown broth, made from light soy sauce (usukuchi shōyu), is used in western Japan. This is even noticeable in packaged instant noodles, which are often sold in two different versions for east and west.

Kitsune udon: “Fox udon”. Topped with aburaage (sweetened deep-fried tofu pockets). This originated in Osaka.

Let’s have a look at this foxy noodle.

Daikoku Kitsune Udon – Japan

#2359: Daikoku Kitsune Udon - Japan - The Ramen Rater - うどん

The distributor/import sticker (click to enlarge).

#2359: Daikoku Kitsune Udon - Japan - The Ramen Rater - うどん

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains fish. To prepare, add boiling water to fill line and cover for 3 minutes. Stir and enjoy!

#2359: Daikoku Kitsune Udon - Japan - The Ramen Rater - うどん

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2359: Daikoku Kitsune Udon - Japan - The Ramen Rater - うどん

The noodle block.

#2359: Daikoku Kitsune Udon - Japan - The Ramen Rater - うどん

Loose bits from inside the cup. Note the little granules.

#2359: Daikoku Kitsune Udon - Japan - The Ramen Rater - うどん

Finished (click to enlarge). The noodles were a bit wider, but not by much. This way of presenting udon always confused me a little, but hey whatever works. While the noodles were decent, the broth was a salty and rough go. The broth had a very strong fish taste to it which is fine, but the saltiness level was extreme. The kamaboko is everywhere which I really like as are the seaweed and strips of tofu. 1.5 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4904511006062.

#2359: Daikoku Kitsune Udon - Japan - The Ramen Rater - うどん

Daikoku My Friends Big source chow mein 120g ~ 12 pieces

A trip to 7-Eleven in Japan!

#1626: Nissin Gonbuto Kitsune Udon

This is another of the Gonbuto bowls. Nissin Gonbuto Kitsune Udon has a unique preparation regime which was quite hard to figure out – I figured it out after a lot of research (to be honest, I read the side numbers). Let’s have a look at this Nissin Gonbuto Kitsune Udon bowl!

 A distributor/import sticker (click image to enlarge).

 Detail from the side panels (click image to enlarge).

 Detail of the lid (click image to enlarge). To prepare, boil 320ml water and set aside. Take udon pack and microwave at 500w for 30 seconds. Add soup base sachet to bowl and add in boiling water. Stir. Add in udon you microwaved. Add on kitsune and sprinkle with garnish. Enjoy!

The fresh udon pouch.

The soup base sachet.

Lots of powder.

The garnish sachet.

Lots of little bits.

Fried tofu!

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). The udon came out just right – standard fresh pouch gauge and chew. The broth has a soy and fish flavor to it which was kind of ho hum to me but not bad. The fried tofu was way too sweet for my liking, almost like a bread with syrup. 2.75 out of 5.0 stars.  JAN bar code 4902105216415.

Another popular tempura udon from Nissin Japan is this Hokkaido Gentei KITA no DONBEI Tempura Udon.

A Nissin Gonbuto TV spot featuring kitsune udon.

#1493: Maruchan Magomi-an Kitsune Udon (Eastern Japanese Flavor)

Thanks to Yuji Hashimoto over at Takamori Kosan of Japan for helping me to translate this one! Today’s review is one that I think I found up in Canada. It looks to be similar to Maruchan’s regular Kitsune Udon bowl – the red one.Kitsune means ‘fox’ in Japanese. Here’s a little something about the ‘kitsune myth’ from wikipedia –

Kitsune (?, IPA: [kitsɯne] ( )) is the Japanese word for fox. Foxes are a common subject of Japanese folklore; in English, kitsune refers to them in this context. Stories depict them as intelligent beings and as possessing magical abilities that increase with their age and wisdom. Foremost among these is the ability to assume human form. While some folktales speak of kitsune employing this ability to trick others—as foxes in folklore often do—other stories portray them as faithful guardians, friends, lovers, and wives.

Foxes and human beings lived close together in ancient Japan; this companionship gave rise to legends about the creatures. Kitsune have become closely associated with Inari, a Shinto kami or spirit, and serve as its messengers. This role has reinforced the fox’s supernatural significance. The more tails a kitsune has—they may have as many as nine—the older, wiser, and more powerful it is. Because of their potential power and influence, some people make offerings to them as to a deity.

Let’s have a look.

Detail of the side panels (click image to enlarge). Almost certain it contains fish. To prepare, add contents of sachet and leave fried tofu block inside. Add boiling water to line and re-cover for 5 minutes. Stir and enjoy!

Detail of the lid (click image to enlarge).

The udon block.

A nice big sliced of fried tofu.

The soup base sachet.

Has a fish-based scent.

 Finished (click image to enlarge). Added kamaboko and green onion. The noodles are flat and wide – and thick. They have a light chewiness to them. The broth has a salty and had a soy and bonito flavor. I should also note that the broth was very thin, but that worked very well. The fried tofu was very good – like a slab of meat to tear at every other bite or so. Really makes it seem a fuller meal. 4.25 out of 5.0 stars. The EAN bar code 4901990321228.


This is Maruchan Akai Kitsune Udon, which is very smiliar – get it here!

A TV spot for Maruchan Seimen instant noodles.

#678: Wang Kitsune Udon Noodle

Here’s another one from the nice people at RamenPleace.com! This is a Korean udon bowl with fried tofu – usually something I would imagine in a Japanese bowl. Let’s see how it tastes!

Here’s the side of the bowl (click image to enlarge). I like how one of the places these come from is San Leandro, California – the first time I met my wife in person, San Leandro was a place we went – we went down by the water and ate some Round Table Pizza on the tailgate. Good times!

Here is the noodle packet. Fresh, wide noodles!

Liquid soup base! Big packet!

The Kitsune! Fried tofu is really good!

Ahhh the good stuff!

Awaiting water to the line and a three minute spin in the microwave.

After cooking, add flake and stir!

Finished (click image to enlarge). I added a few dashes of Texas Pete Garlic Hot Sauce and a couple pieces of sushinori. The noodles are your standard fresh udon – nice and wide and chewy. The broth is great – sweet and hearty and a hint of seafood taste. The fried tofu is wonderfully sweet and chewy with a nice texture. The flake veggies were nice too – abundant and of good character. All in all, I’m quite pleased with this one! 4.0 out of 5.0 stars! UPC barcode 087703082823 – get it here!

Now this looks like fun!

Korean fried tofu side dish

#662: Daikoku Shokuh Kitsune Udon

Here’s another Japanese bowl I got at Uwajimaya. The one yesterday was so good, I thought a kitsune udon bowl would be nice today.

Here’s the little sticker on the bottom of the bowl.

One single seasoning packet – pretty common with the Japanese bowls I’ve tried as of late.

Here’s everything awaiting the water. Fried tofu!!!

Finished (click image to enlarge). I added a fried egg with a dash or two of pepper, some kizami shoga (pickled ginger), some Ajishima Kimchi Furikake, some fried shallot and a little bok choy and sushinori (seaweed). The noodle were broad and full of flavor from the broth. Not very chewy but not soggy or spongy. The broth is sweet and salty and quite enjoyable. The udon is nice and sweet as well and delicious. Everything is quite nice here. 4.25 out of 5.0 stars. UPc barcode 4904511604046 .

Here’s a Cooking With Dog where they make Omurice. Omurice is well known amnong ramen junkies as it appears notably in the film Tampopo.

Here’s the scene from Tampopo.

#639: Nissin Gozen Kitsune Udon

Kitsune Udon Gozen, as I type thy name into here, I am pretty sure you’ll be remembered as one of my all time favorites. This was purchased during a recent trip to Seattle to Uwajimaya. It was there that I truly began my journey into the world of the instant noodle so many years ago.

So what is Kitsune Udon? Kitsune is fried tofu. Udon is simply a wider gauge noodle.

This EVERYTHING that was on the side of the container (click image to enlarge).

I think the full label has more to say, but here are some of the main points of ingredients and nutrition.

A single packet of dry powder.

The powder atop the udon. The vegetables were underneath the noodle block. I added a tiny dash of Cavendar’s Greek seasoning to the water that the noodles steeped in.

This is the piece of fried tofu. It will sit atop the noodle block and steep with the boiling water. It is about the size of an audio cassette and about four millimeters thick.

Two fried eggs with a dash of Lindberg-Snider Red Baron BBQ seasoning on the left and some fried shallots with some Tony Chachere’s Creole seasoning on the right.

Finished (click image to enlarge). I also added some kizami shoga (hot pink pickled ginger) and a couple dashes of Texas Pete hot sauce on top of the eggs. Let’s start with the noodles. They are soft and very wide – not chewy but not mushy either. The broth is salty and rich in flavor – soy sauce and a nice hint of seafood.  The tofu was very nice – tender and delectable. I relished every bite. This is a 5.0 out of 5.0 star affair BEFORE the added eggs and shallots, etc. Great stuff!!! Happy Martin Luther King Jr. day! UPC barcode 4902105201954.

A comparison of two Kitsune Udon bowls that are practically identical.

This reviewed product was so enjoyable, it deserves the high holy Desslok tribute!

#149: Maruchan Akai Kitsune Udon Instant Oriental Noodles

So here’s one of the large noodle bowls I have. If you’ll recall, I’ve reviewed Kitsune Udon before – I did Sapporo Ichiban’s. This one’s a little different. The Kitsune is much bigger this time. Also, it’s a bowl!

See? Got some big stuff here.

There was a while lot of powder in here – a whole heck of a lot of powder.

The finished product (click image to enlarge). Doesn’t that look nice? I think the bowl came out looking very appetizing. The udon was nice and thick and not too rubbery – I liked that. The broth was salty and very soy. The kitsune was delectable – like a chunk of meat but not meat. Ultra tasty. I don’t know what the little things on the kitsune are… They were interesting – kind of spongy. I’m giving this bowl 4.0 out of 5.0 stars. Tasty stuff! Get it here.

#79: Sapporo Ichiban Kitsune Udon Japanese Style Noodles

Today, Kit & I walked to 99 Ranch Market together which was a lot of fun. I wanted to pick an interesting instant noodle to review, so I went with this one – Sapporo Ichiban Kitsune Udon.

Okay so soup base sure but what the heck is that weird looking rectangular thing? Fried bean curd (tofu)! Weird looking isn’t it?

Here’s the soup base – there’s lot of it too.

Okay so here we go. First off, udon is a reference to the type of noodles here. Udon is a heavier gauge noodle. These were chewier, thicker and flat. The fried tofu came out nicely; much like meat. I like this stuff – it has some character to it to be sure – not your every day stuff. I give it a 3.25 out of 5 stars. It’s not the best stuff ever; it is very salty and doesn’t seem to have enough noodles to deal with the 2.5 cups of liquid.I really did enjoy the tofu though and the noodles themselves tasted great. Find it here.