Tag Archives: retort pouch

Meet The Manufacturer: #3036: TTL Pickled Vegetable Beef With Hua-Diao Liquor Instant Noodle – Taiwan

Meet The Manufacturer: #3036: TTL Pickled Vegetable Beef With Hua-Diao Liquor Instant Noodle - Taiwan

It is with great thanks and a week of interesting flavors that we bid adieu to the last of the varieties from TTL. This is the packaged version of the pickled vegetable beef variety. I really wasn’t sure how all these liquor-infused varieties would go, but they’ve been really quite impressive. Let’s check out this final variety.

TTL Pickled Vegetable Beef With Hua-Diao Liquor Instant Noodle – Taiwan

Meet The Manufacturer: #3036: TTL Pickled Vegetable Beef With Hua-Diao Liquor Instant Noodle - Taiwan

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains beef. To prepare, cook noodles in 500ml boiling water for 3 minutes. Add in all sachets. Finally, stir and enjoy!

Meet The Manufacturer: #3036: TTL Pickled Vegetable Beef With Hua-Diao Liquor Instant Noodle - Taiwan

The noodle block.

Meet The Manufacturer: #3036: TTL Pickled Vegetable Beef With Hua-Diao Liquor Instant Noodle - Taiwan

A dry sachet.

Meet The Manufacturer: #3036: TTL Pickled Vegetable Beef With Hua-Diao Liquor Instant Noodle - Taiwan

A powder and vegetable mixture.

Meet The Manufacturer: #3036: TTL Pickled Vegetable Beef With Hua-Diao Liquor Instant Noodle - Taiwan

A paste sachet.

Meet The Manufacturer: #3036: TTL Pickled Vegetable Beef With Hua-Diao Liquor Instant Noodle - Taiwan

Thick and oily.

Meet The Manufacturer: #3036: TTL Pickled Vegetable Beef With Hua-Diao Liquor Instant Noodle - Taiwan

A liquid sachet.

Meet The Manufacturer: #3036: TTL Pickled Vegetable Beef With Hua-Diao Liquor Instant Noodle - Taiwan

Hua diao liquor.

Meet The Manufacturer: #3036: TTL Pickled Vegetable Beef With Hua-Diao Liquor Instant Noodle - Taiwan

The retort pouch.

Meet The Manufacturer: #3036: TTL Pickled Vegetable Beef With Hua-Diao Liquor Instant Noodle - Taiwan

Large chunks of beef and a sauce.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added soft egg, fried onion and scallion. Noodles were soft and mellow as always with a large quantity. The broth has this elegantly rich character and great beef taste paired with the hua diao liquor. It goes so amazingly well. Pickled vegetable here and there goes well too. Just a wonderful beef variety. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 4710199109663.

Meet The Manufacturer: #3036: TTL Pickled Vegetable Beef With Hua-Diao Liquor Instant Noodle - Taiwan

Taiwan TTL Hops Carved Chicken Instant Noodles 3 Bags Packed 台灣花雕雞泡麵3包組

Watch me cook this one up on an episode of Instant Noodle Recipe Time!

#2947: Kiki Sichuan Beef Noodles Soup (台湾KIKI 牛肉面)

#2947: Kiki Sichuan Beef Noodles Soup (台湾KIKI 牛肉面)

Alright – to start off, wow. This is huge. This box screams fancy, that’s for sure. I’ve had a few of Kiki’s dry noodle varieties, but recently this and a Mapo Tofu variety came out as well (which of course I’ll be reviewing soon). Beef Noodle Soup is exceedingly popular in Taiwan – here’s a little about it from Wikipedia –

Beef noodle soup is a Chinese and Taiwanese noodle soup made of stewed or red braised beef, beef brothvegetables and Chinese noodles. It exists in various forms throughout East Asia and Southeast Asia. Beef noodle soup was first created by the Hui people (a Chinese Muslim ethnic group) during the Tang Dynasty of China.[1][2]

In the Overseas Chinese communities in North America, this food can be found in Taiwanese and Chinese restaurants. In Mainland China, a large bowl of it is often taken as a whole meal with or without any side dish. In Taiwan, vendors that sell beef noodle may also have optional, often cold side dishes, such as braised dried tofu, seaweed, or pork intestine. Beef noodles is often served with suan cai (Chinese sauerkraut) on top, green onion, and sometimes other vegetables in the soup as well.[3]

In Chinese, “牛肉麵” literally means “beef noodles”. Mainland Chinese and Hong Kong restaurants may have a tendency to distinguish between “牛肉麵” “beef noodles”, and “牛腩麵” “beef brisket noodles”; with the former containing either beef shank or beef slices and the latter containing only brisket. It is sometimes served with wontons. In Taiwan, “牛肉麵” typically consists of either brisket or shank only, though many restaurants also have tendon or a more expensive option with both meat and tendon (“半筋半肉麵”, literally “half tendon half meat noodle”) and occasionally with tripe; 三寶麵, literally “three-treasure noodle”, usually denotes a bowl containing all three. If one orders “牛肉湯麵” or “beef soup noodles” in a restaurant in TaiwanMainland China, or Hong Kong, they might be given a cheaper bowl of noodles in only beef broth but no beef. If one orders a “牛肉湯” or “beef-soup”, they could be given a more expensive bowl of beef broth with chunks of beef in it but without noodles. In Tainan, beef soup (牛肉湯) denotes a distinct and local specialty, where sliced beef is blanched in hot soup and accompanied by shredded ginger.

Beef noodle is often served as fast food in China, with Mr. Lee being the largest chain. In Taiwan it is sometimes considered a national dish and every year the city of Taipei holds an annual Beef Noodle Festival, where various chefs and restaurants compete for the “best beef noodle” title in Taiwan.[4][5] However, some Taiwanese (particularly the elderly generation) still refrain from eating it. A traditional reluctance towards slaughtering precious cattle needed for agriculture, and an emotional attachment and feeling of gratitude and thanks to the animals traditionally used for very hard labour. Due to influences from the influx of out of province Chinese from mainland China in the early 1900s, the Taiwanese version of beef noodle soup is now one of the most popular dishes in Taiwan.[6]

I’ve never reviewed something like this one before – let’s open the box and you’ll see what I’m talking about.

Kiki Sichuan Beef Noodles Soup – Taiwan

#2947: Kiki Sichuan Beef Noodles Soup (台湾KIKI 牛肉面)

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains beef. To prepare, open the beef soup package and pour into the pot, cook for 1 minutes with high heat. Cook the noodles in boiling water separately for 4 to 5 minutes with medium heat. Turn off the heat and drain the noodles. Finally, add noodles and beef soup into a bowl, stir and enjoy!

#2947: Kiki Sichuan Beef Noodles Soup (台湾KIKI 牛肉面)

A package of dry noodles.

#2947: Kiki Sichuan Beef Noodles Soup (台湾KIKI 牛肉面)

Okay, so this is what makes this a lot different and unique from any variety I’ve reviewed yet. This is the soup. This is a very large package – you don’t add water, you just heat it and add in the noodles you’ve cooked and drained separately.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added scallion. The noodles are very good – plentiful on quantity and excellent as far as quality. They had an almost squarish gauge and a very nice chew that I expect from Guanmiao. The broth is very complex – a lot of things going on here. A very tasty beef flavor has notes of herbs and spices – one being Sichuan pepper of course, but it was cooperative rather than a bully in the bowl. The beef and tendon was very good, and of good quantity, but I was left wanting more of it – which I think is natural as it’s quite flavorful. Impressed. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 4713302682039.

#2947: Kiki Sichuan Beef Noodles Soup (台湾KIKI 牛肉面)

A Culinary History of Taipei: Beyond Pork and Ponlai (Big City Food Biographies)

This is the Unboxing Time With The Ramen Rater where I unboxed these – and you can really get a feel for how big this box is

#2870: Little Cook Tomato Beef Noodles

#2870: Little Cook Tomato Beef Noodles

I received this as a gift from a representative of the Little Cook brand in Taipei, Taiwan at the Taiwan International Food Expo! Thank you very much! She also accepted the third place award from The Ramen Rater’s Top Ten Taiwanese Instant Noodles Of All Time 2017 Edition – Little Cook Green Curry –  at the awards show. I’ve been waiting for the right time to have this one! Let’s take a look!

Little Cook Tomato Beef Noodles – Taiwan

#2870: Little Cook Tomato Beef Noodles

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). contains beef. To prepare, open lid and take everything out. Add noodle block and powder sachet contents. Add 600ml boiling water and cover for 5 minutes with large retort pouch sitting on lid to heat. Add in the rest of the sachet and retort pouches. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2870: Little Cook Tomato Beef Noodles

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2870: Little Cook Tomato Beef Noodles

A sealed noodle block.

#2870: Little Cook Tomato Beef Noodles

A dry base sachet.

#2870: Little Cook Tomato Beef Noodles

A light powder.

#2870: Little Cook Tomato Beef Noodles

An enormous retort pouch.

A lot of beef and liquid – note, this isn’t like the little cup above this is a much larger cup.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion. The noodles are thick and wide with a good chew to them. Broth definitely is good with a tomato and beef taste to it that isn’t thin and watery but strong and rich. The included beef was exemplary. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 8852098706379.

#2730: Little Cook Braised Beef Noodles With Tendon & Meat 小廚師牛肉麵母親節禮盒

L i t t l e   C o o k , Instant Bowl Noodles, Spicy Beef Flavour, net weight 170 g (Pack of 2 bowls)

A TV spot for this extra premium range by Little Cook.

#2768: Wei Lih Yi Du Zan Beef Instant Noodles

#2768: Wei Lih Yi Du Zan Beef Instant Noodles

Another big meaty bowl I lugged back from Taiwan in November 2017. A reader on the Facebook page for The Ramen Rater requested I pick this one up and I found it I believe at FamilyMart.

This is a pretty heavy bowl – as it contains a retort pouch. A retort pouch is a kind of metallic pouch that contains meat and sauce or vegetables or fish – basically a pouch that allows such things to stay inside at room temperature for long periods of time – kind of like a can. Let’s crack open this beast and look inside and see what we have here.

Wei Lih Yi Du Zan Beef Instant Noodles – Taiwan

#2768: Wei Lih Yi Du Zan Beef Instant Noodles

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge). contains beef. To prepare, add all sachets except retort pouch and boiling water to fill line. Cover for 5 minutes. Add in retort pouch. Finally, stir and enjoy

#2768: Wei Lih Yi Du Zan Beef Instant Noodles

The noodle block.

#2768: Wei Lih Yi Du Zan Beef Instant Noodles

A dry base sachet.

#2768: Wei Lih Yi Du Zan Beef Instant Noodles

Powder and vegetables.

#2768: Wei Lih Yi Du Zan Beef Instant Noodles

A liquid sachet.

#2768: Wei Lih Yi Du Zan Beef Instant Noodles

A thick paste.

#2768: Wei Lih Yi Du Zan Beef Instant Noodles

Gotta say,. I love this sachet. I actually made a t-shirt of it!

#2768: Wei Lih Yi Du Zan Beef Instant Noodles

My conditioning allows for full usage.

#2768: Wei Lih Yi Du Zan Beef Instant Noodles

The retort pouch – very large.

#2768: Wei Lih Yi Du Zan Beef Instant Noodles

Real chunks of beef and sauce.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added hard boiled egg, Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, and spring onion. The noodles were of alright quality. The broth was just not doing it for me. The meat in the retort pouch – that was awesome – I wish the broth had more of that flavor to be honest – it was the star of the show. If it had, perhaps the noodle would’ve taken on some of the braised beef lovin’. 3.75 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 4710199013298.

#2768: Wei Lih Yi Du Zan Beef Instant Noodles

New Taiwan Wei Lih Original Classic Braised Flavor Sauce for cooking noodle

A sort of creepy TV spot

#2672: Wei Lih Roast Beef Stew Noodle

#2672: Wei Lih Roast Beef Stew Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Woot, woot! This one comes by way of Jay from Taiwan – thank you! This is a meaty one! Big retort pouch inside. These things actually have some heft to them (they weigh a bit).

Alright – let’s check out this one by a big Taiwanese company – let’s bring on the beef!

Wei Lih Roast Beef Stew Noodle – Taiwan

#2672: Wei Lih Roast Beef Stew Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains beef. To prepare, add noodle block, dry sachet, and smaller liquid sachets to 500ml boiling water and cook for 3 minutes. Place retort pouch in boiling water for a little bit for it to heat. Add in retort pouch contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2672: Wei Lih Roast Beef Stew Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The noodle block.

#2672: Wei Lih Roast Beef Stew Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The dry base sachet.

#2672: Wei Lih Roast Beef Stew Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Powder and vegetables.

#2672: Wei Lih Roast Beef Stew Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

A liquid sachet.

#2672: Wei Lih Roast Beef Stew Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

A thick paste.

#2672: Wei Lih Roast Beef Stew Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

I really like this sachet a lot.

#2672: Wei Lih Roast Beef Stew Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Chili paste – smells and looks spicy!

#2672: Wei Lih Roast Beef Stew Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

A large retort pouch.

#2672: Wei Lih Roast Beef Stew Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

A decent amount of beef.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts and spring onion. Noodles had a surprisingly firm tooth and were very plentiful. Decent gauge as well. The broth has a lot of beef flavor and it was very good. Oiliness was on point and spiciness from the paste was great. The retort pouch yielded treasure in the beef which was of excellent quality and rounded everything out nicely. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 4710199017012.

#2672: Wei Lih Roast Beef Stew Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

New Taiwan Wei Lih Original Classic Braised Flavor Sauce for cooking noodle

A sort of creepy TV spot

#1166: Unif Man Han Feast Sichuan Chili Eel Flavor Instant Noodle

Here’s one from T&T Supermarket up in Vancouver, BC! Many Taiwanese extolled the virtues of these Man Han Feast varieties, especially a beef version. I had the Spring Onion Eel flavor a while back and this is the only other one I’ve seen available in North America. So what does Man Han Feast mean? Wikipedia says:

Manhan Quanxi, literally Manchu Han Imperial Feast was one of the grandest meals ever documented in Chinese cuisine. It consisted of at least 108 unique dishes from the Manchu and Han Chinese culture during the Qing Dynasty, and it is only reserved and intended for the emperors. The meal was held for three whole days, across six banquets. The culinary skills consisted of cooking methods from all over Imperial China.[1]

If you want to read more about the myriad of exotic dishes, here’s the full Wikipedia article. Let’s check this unique variety out!

There were three large import/distributor stickers on the side of the outer packaging of the bowl (click image to enlarge). Contains eel!

Lots of info on the lid (click image to enlarge).

The noodle block.

The dry seasoning sachet.

A big packet with a lot inside!

Liquid base sachet.

Thick and oily.

A large retort pouch.

Spicy eel – and a lot of it. Smells excellent.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added sauteed green onion, Fresno chili pepper and Walla Walla sweet onion. The noodles are flat and broad. They have a nice quality to them; not too chewy but very good for a bowl noodle. The broth is rich with a good spiciness. The added bonus with this is the eel – it’s really good! Everything is rich and hearty and it’s definitely a feast to behold and consume. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 4710088100528.

Here’s a Unif advertisement featuring the beef bowl.

#773: Little Cook Instant Noodle TVP Stewed Pork Flavor

Here’s another one that was sent in by Michelle L. of New York, New York – thanks again! TVP? What’s TVP? Well, I’ve had it quite a few times before. TVP stands for ‘textured vegetable protein’ and is basically fake meat. Usually you couldn’t get pork in a packet coming from Thailand into the states – fake pork on the other hand is doable.

The distributor’s label with nutrition facts.

A side panel – click to enlarge.

Part of the noodle block.

Powdered seasoning packet.

Powdered seasoning with what look to be bits of vegetables strewn in there.

The contents of the oil packet. Forgot to take a picture of the oil packet – it was clear and had the same triangle pattern as the powder packet.

In this big metallic packet is the textured vegetable protein.

I know, but you put ANYTHING in a clear bowl like this and it looks like cat food. It actually smells quite nice.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added some mixed veggies and a little kizami shoga (pickled ginger). The noodles are interesting; the word bulbous comes to mind. They’re a little wider with an interestingly puckered texture. Different and good. The broth has a nice pork taste and is reminiscent of a duck flavored instant I had before. The textured vegetable protein chunks are abundant and not too shabby, although they have a little more sponginess than I expected. Again, the duck I had before was closer to a real piece of meat than this was. All in all, not bad – quite a big bowl of noodles for a $1.59 cup! I liked it. 3.5 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 4710249000841 .

Old Thai commercial

Salvador Dali on Mike Wallace Interview – 1958

#439: Little Cook Tom Yum Seafood Premium Noodle

So the idea of a seafood noodle soup with fake seafood has been kind of daunting for the past couple months. However, today was the day. I must fear no ramen! So, here we have some seafood tom yum from Thailand.

Nice earthy colors from left to right: dry seasoning powder, seasoned oil paste and finally chili powder.

Then we’ve got a retort pouch!

It’s full of fake seafood – looks like it’s made from tapioca and other things. There appear to be mushrooms in there too according to the ingredients.

Wow now that’s a crazy looking pile of packet contents. Should be interesting…

Click image to enlarge. Added a couple fried eggs. So here we are. The noodles are of a wider gauge – broad and flat and actually quite good. The broth is flavorful – spicy and lemonny. As for the fake seafood, it’s not bad. However the mushrooms are kind of funky – I had one larger piece that was almost the consistency of a carrot. So this was pretty good stuff I’ll admit and I’m kind of pleased I have two of them. Giving this one a 3.0 out of 5.0 stars. Get it here.

#386: Fu Chang Chinese Noodle Company Pork, Seafood & Noodles Combo

Well, this looks like a lot of insanity! Here we go!!!

Wait – I thought this was pork and seafood flavor, not shrimp flavor…

Pretty impressive – four packets!

So there’s the contents of that retort pouch on top – looks kind of like cat food and has the same consistency. The dry powder was chunky… The oil looked okay though and a nice amount of vegetables.

Here’s where all hell breaks loose. First off, there are no instructions included on how to cook this. At the end of the seasoning packet ingredients, notice that it has Fe in it. WHAT THE HELL IS ‘Fe?’ Also, no Red Chili Powder Packet. It’s like this product isn’t this product.

I went with my instincts; hell, I’ve had over 380 different varieties of noodles and I should be able to figure out this one’s cooking directions. I added enough boiling water to cover the noodles and all the ingredients. Guess what? The biggest insult I have ever had to deal with – the bowl LEAKS. Boiling water with oil and seasoning all over my table.  And floor. I transferred this stuff to a bowl and added a little water and covered for 4 minutes.

Click image to enlarge. The noodles were absolutely horrible. No character whatsoever. The retort stuff just didn’t work at all. The broth tasted very odd. Add that to the lack of instructions, incorrect ingredients and a leaky bowl and you get a ZERO STAR bowl of noodles. 0.0 out of 5.0 stars. What a mistake these were. Get them here.

Yes, I’m voluntarily Rick Rolling this review. You know the rules…..

And I’ve sold out to the Keyboard Cat as well.