Tag Archives: kiki

#2969: Kiki Mapo Tofu Noodles (台湾KIKI)

#2969: Kiki Mapo Tofu Noodles (台湾KIKI) - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Here’s the second fancy boxed variety from Kiki that came out recently. This sounds really good – here’s a little about Mapo Tofu from Wikipedia –

Mapo doufu or Mapo tofu (麻婆豆腐) is a popular Chinese dish from Sichuan province. It consists of tofu set in a spicy sauce, typically a thin, oily, and bright red suspension, based on douban 豆瓣 (fermented broadbean and chili paste) and douchi 豆豉 (fermented black beans), along with minced meat, usually pork or beef. Variations exist with other ingredients such as water chestnutsonions, other vegetables, or wood ear fungus.

“Ma” stands for “ma-zi” (Chinese: mázi, 麻子) which means pockmarks. “Po” is the first syllable of “popo” (Chinese: 婆婆, pópo) which means an old woman or grandma. Hence, mapo is an old woman whose face is pockmarked. It is thus sometimes translated as “pockmarked grandma’s beancurd”.

According to Mrs. Chiang’s Szechwan Cookbook: “Eugene Wu, the Librarian of the Harvard Yenching Library, grew up in Chengdu and claims that as a schoolboy he used to eat Pock-Marked Ma’s Bean Curd or mapo doufu, at a restaurant run by the original Pock-Marked Ma herself. One ordered by weight, specifying how many grams of bean curd and meat, and the serving would be weighed out and cooked as the diner watched. It arrived at the table fresh, fragrant, and so spicy hot, or la, that it actually caused sweat to break out.”[1]

Authentic Mapo doufu is powerfully spicy with both conventional “heat” spiciness and the characteristic “mala” (numbing spiciness) flavor of Sichuan cuisine. The feel of the particular dish is often described by cooks using seven specific Chinese adjectives: 麻 (numbing), 辣 (spicy hot), 烫 (hot temperature), 鲜 (fresh), 嫩 (tender and soft), 香 (aromatic), and 酥 (flaky). The authentic form of the dish is increasingly easy to find outside China today, but usually only in Sichuanese restaurants that do not adapt the dish for non-Sichuanese tastes.

The most important and necessary ingredients in the dish that give it the distinctive flavour are chili broad bean paste (salty bean paste) from Sichuan’s Pixian county (郫县豆瓣酱), fermented black beanschili oil, chili flakes of the heaven-facing pepper (朝天辣椒), Sichuan peppercornsgarlicgreen onions, and rice wine.[2] Supplementary ingredients include water or stock, sugar (depending on the saltiness of the bean paste brand used), and starch (if it is desired to thicken the sauce).[3]

That’s pretty interesting about the pock-marked grandmother. Sounds like an interesting dish – at least in the non-Americanized way. I’ve tried the Western way and this one sounds better. Let’s give it a go!

Kiki Mapo Tofu Noodles – Taiwan

#2969: Kiki Mapo Tofu Noodles (台湾KIKI) - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, boil 800ml water and put the Mapo Tofu Soup Package into the boiling water for 3 minutes. Cook the noodles in boiling water separately for 4 to 5 minutes with medium heat. Drain. Pour the Mapo Tofu Soup Package into a bowl with the noodles. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2969: Kiki Mapo Tofu Noodles (台湾KIKI) - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

The noodles in their own sealed package.

#2969: Kiki Mapo Tofu Noodles (台湾KIKI) - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

The soup – in a really large pouch!

Finished (click to enlarge). Noodles are just out of sight – excellent chew and gauge. They are a perfect fit for the broth which has strong Sichuan pepper notes and a good oiliness. The tofu pieces are everywhere and of excellent quality. My only complaint is the level of Sichuan pepper flavor. I’ve been running into a lot of things lately that just have too much of it for my liking lately and I’m going to say that if you love Sichuan pepper, this is probably going to be the right amount for you, but unfortunately it drowns out all other flavors. 2.5 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 4713302682046.

#2969: Kiki Mapo Tofu Noodles (台湾KIKI) - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

A Culinary History of Taipei: Beyond Pork and Ponlai (Big City Food Biographies)

This is the Unboxing Time With The Ramen Rater where I unbox these – and you can really get a feel for how big these box versions are.

#2963: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Young Vinegar

#2963: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Young Vinegar

Recently, I had the chance to try Kiki’s aged variety and liked it quite a bit. I really don’t know much about vinegar to be honest. Here’s a little about it from Wikipedia –

Vinegar is a liquid consisting of about 5–20% acetic acid (CH3COOH), water (H2O), and trace chemicals that may include flavorings. Acetic acid is produced by the fermentation of ethanol by acetic acid bacteria.[1] It is now mainly used as a cooking ingredient, or in pickling.

As the most easily manufactured mild acid, it has historically had a wide variety of industrial, medical, and domestic uses. Some of these are still commonly practiced, such as its use as a household cleaner.

Chinese black vinegar is an aged product made from rice, wheat, milletsorghum, or a combination thereof. It has an inky black color and a complex, malty flavor. There is no fixed recipe, so some Chinese black vinegars may contain added sugar, spices, or caramel color. The most popular variety, Zhenjiang vinegar, originates in the city of Zhenjiang in Jiangsu Province, eastern China.[17] Shanxi mature vinegar is another popular type that is made exclusively from sorghum and other grains. Nowadays in Shanxi province, there are still some traditional workshops producing handmade varieties which are aged for at least five years with a high acidity. Only the varieties made in Taiyuan and some counties in Jinzhong and aged for at least three years is considered authentic Shanxi mature vinegar according to the latest national standard. A somewhat lighter form of black vinegar, made from rice, is produced in Japan, where it is called kurozu.

Okay, so that’s a lot of info about vinegar. When I was in Taiwan in November 2017, I saw a booth at a food expo with different vinegars and people sipping on it. As it turns out, there’s such a thing as drinking vinegar too – one just made to drink! Fascinating. Well, let’s check out this unique variety from Taiwan!

Kiki Noodles Mixed With Young Vinegar – Taiwan

#2963: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Young Vinegar

A distributor’s/import label (click to enlarge). This one is for Hong Kong.

#2963: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Young Vinegar

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add noodles to a pot of boiling water and cook for 3~5 minutes. Drain. Add in sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2963: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Young Vinegar

One of the five packs inside.

#2963: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Young Vinegar

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge).

#2963: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Young Vinegar

The noodle block.

#2963: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Young Vinegar

The first of two liquid sachets.

#2963: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Young Vinegar

Oil and soy I’m guessing.

#2963: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Young Vinegar

The second sachet.

#2963: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Young Vinegar

The young stuff.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added scallions, sliced chashu pork and nanami togarashi. The noodle is just great – love this style of noodle. Great chew and mouthfeel. Gauge is on point too. They work well with the flavoring – young vinegar definitely isn’t as pungent or strong – and it works well here. A nice flavor all around with a touch of heat and a little ginger back. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 4713302680035.

#2963: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Young Vinegar

Rilakkuma Pottery Ramen Noodles Bowl W/ Spoon

Okay so what you’re seeing here is noodles that have just come off a conveyor belt being folded and set on a tray that will go either into a big facility with fans that dry them or out into a sunny day that dries them. I went to a factory two years ago that did the latter and I tried to fold these noodles and I’ll tell you one thing – it’s not as easy as it looks. This shot is very slow – people who do this for a living literally fold these at a million miles an hour – super fast motion that they could probably do with their eyes closed.

The Ramen Rater’s Top Ten Taiwanese Instant Noodles Of All Time 2018 Edition | 2018台灣十大泡麵排行

The Ramen Rater's Top Ten Taiwanese Instant Noodles Of All Time 2018 Edition

Another year gone by – hard to believe. As usual, many, many Taiwanese varieties have crossed my desk. This list comes as I’m about to hit 3,000 reviews as well. Pretty crazy. These are my favorite Taiwanese varieties out of all my reviews up to #2,943. As always, if you want me to try something I’ve not – drop me a line. With that, let’s check out The Ramen Rater’s Top Ten Taiwanese Instant Noodles Of All Time 2018 Edition!

The Ramen Rater’s Top Ten Taiwanese Instant Noodles Of All Time 2018 Edition

Video Presentation

A visual presentation of The Ramen Rater’s Top Ten Taiwanese Instant Noodles Of All Time 2018 Edition.

The Ramen Rater’s Top Ten Taiwanese Instant Noodles Of All Time 2018 Edition

#10: Three Meters Noodles Spicy Taste

The Ramen Rater's Top Ten Taiwanese Instant Noodles Of All Time 2018 Edition

The noodles gauge and chew are really great – very impressed. The flavor is different than many Sichuan spicy varieties – it has a balance which I thoroughly enjoyed and recommend. Original review

#9: Wu-Mu Ma Jiou Mian Xian : Hua-Tiau Chiew Chicken Flavor

The Ramen Rater's Top Ten Taiwanese Instant Noodles Of All Time 2018 Edition

The noodles are very good – like premium instants,. Liked the texture and chew on them very much. The broth had a very tasty and complex taste – I really liked the chicken taste augmented with the wolfberry and wine – it worked together in perfect harmony. Original review

#8: Kiki Noodles Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle

The Ramen Rater's Top Ten Taiwanese Instant Noodles Of All Time 2018 Edition

The noodles are thin and have a very agreeable mouthfeel. The flavor is a sweet kind of onion hit which is quite tasty. Original review

#7: A-Sha Dan Zai Noodle

The Ramen Rater's Top Ten Taiwanese Instant Noodles Of All Time 2018 Edition

The noodles have a flat and broad gauge and an excellent chewiness I’ve come to expect from the A-Sha line of products. The flavor is very good – a kind of spicy, salty, slightly sweet and then this savoriness to it – lots of spices that I can really only describe as tasking like Taiwan. Original review

#6: Three Meters Noodles Shallot Taste

The Ramen Rater's Top Ten Taiwanese Instant Noodles Of All Time 2018 Edition

Nice gauge and light chew. The flavor was just mind-blowingly good and I am thoroughly excited about this one. The shallot flavor is just right – not too salty, not too pushy – just exactly perfect. Original review

#5: Tseng Noodle Scallion With Sichuan Pepper Flavor

The Ramen Rater's Top Ten Taiwanese Instant Noodles Of All Time 2018 Edition

A wide noodle with scalloped edges. These have the bonus of a thin edge and thicker center, giving a delicate as well as hearty aspect. The flavor is very good – a soy bump, some onion hit, then the Sichuan pepper oil. It all works together magnificently. Original review

#4: Little Cook Thailand Green Curry Instant Noodle

The Ramen Rater's Top Ten Taiwanese Instant Noodles Of All Time 2018 Edition

This bowl, in fact, is two bowls. One you steep the noodles in. The second? Drain the broth from the first by poking holes in the lid and pour into it. The noodle is accompanied by a spicy green curry and chunks of vegetable and real chicken. The broth slurping soup worked well too. Original review

#3: Xiao Ban Mian Traditional Shallot & Onion Oil Noodle

The Ramen Rater's Top Ten Taiwanese Instant Noodles Of All Time 2018 Edition

Start with a thin kind of rectangular noodle with a strong chew. The flavor that comes with it is a sweet and savory shallot and scallion oil – and it works so well. Who would think something so simple could be so delightful. Original review

#2: TTL White Wine Carbonara Noodle – Taiwan

The Ramen Rater's Top Ten Taiwanese Instant Noodles Of All Time 2018 Edition

Much to my chagrin, TTL keeps coming out with interesting varieties. TTL stands for Taiwan Tobacco and Liquor – and they always have some kind of alcohol with their products. This one comes with a retort pouch will of creamy sauce and pork which is augmented by a sachet of white wine. A sipping soup is made with a separate sachet. The combination is apt and Very delicious. Original review

#1: Mom’s Dry Noodle Dan Dan Noodle

The Ramen Rater's Top Ten Taiwanese Instant Noodles Of All Time 2018 Edition

The noodles came out with a very nice chew. They aren’t mushy whatsoever and have a confident backbone. The flavor is very good as well. The notes of sesame, Sichuan pepper oil, Sichuan pepper in the dry mix, sesame sauce as well as soy sauce all work together and play well with each other; nobody’s feet get stepped on. Simple yet complex. Original review

Guess What?

Did you know there’s a YouTube channel for The Ramen Rater? There is! I’ve been doing Spicy Noodle Mukbang videos, Unboxing Time With The Ramen Rater where I open boxes I received for the first time in from of a camera, Top Ten Lists and more! I’d really appreciate it if you’d check out The Ramen Rater’s YouTube Channel and subscribe – click the little bell too – that way, you’ll know right when a new video comes out! Here are a couple special announcement I want to make I’m particularly proud of.

New Shows On YouTube From The Ramen Rater

Do you like reading my reviews and seeing what I’m adding to not only Taiwanese instant noodles but others from around the world? I’m proud to present Instant Noodle Recipe Time! This is a daily show where I let you watch me cook the instant noodles I review and garnish them! This is an unedited show where I talk directly to you like an old friend. New episodes come out daily at 2pm (1400h GMT-8).

I’ve been wanting to do a show with my wife Kit for a long time, and I finally figured out something she would like. May I proudly present The Chocolate Break – a show where we try different varieties of chocolate we find. I find something to bring and my wife does as well. We then talk about it, try it, and give our opinions on it. It’s been a lot of fun for us and really interesting too! I was always hunting for new varieties of instant noodles at the store – but now she’s enjoying the hunt for something new and unique to try. New episodes comes out every week on Thursdays at !!am (1100hrs GMT-8).

#2947: Kiki Sichuan Beef Noodles Soup (台湾KIKI 牛肉面)

#2947: Kiki Sichuan Beef Noodles Soup (台湾KIKI 牛肉面)

Alright – to start off, wow. This is huge. This box screams fancy, that’s for sure. I’ve had a few of Kiki’s dry noodle varieties, but recently this and a Mapo Tofu variety came out as well (which of course I’ll be reviewing soon). Beef Noodle Soup is exceedingly popular in Taiwan – here’s a little about it from Wikipedia –

Beef noodle soup is a Chinese and Taiwanese noodle soup made of stewed or red braised beef, beef brothvegetables and Chinese noodles. It exists in various forms throughout East Asia and Southeast Asia. Beef noodle soup was first created by the Hui people (a Chinese Muslim ethnic group) during the Tang Dynasty of China.[1][2]

In the Overseas Chinese communities in North America, this food can be found in Taiwanese and Chinese restaurants. In Mainland China, a large bowl of it is often taken as a whole meal with or without any side dish. In Taiwan, vendors that sell beef noodle may also have optional, often cold side dishes, such as braised dried tofu, seaweed, or pork intestine. Beef noodles is often served with suan cai (Chinese sauerkraut) on top, green onion, and sometimes other vegetables in the soup as well.[3]

In Chinese, “牛肉麵” literally means “beef noodles”. Mainland Chinese and Hong Kong restaurants may have a tendency to distinguish between “牛肉麵” “beef noodles”, and “牛腩麵” “beef brisket noodles”; with the former containing either beef shank or beef slices and the latter containing only brisket. It is sometimes served with wontons. In Taiwan, “牛肉麵” typically consists of either brisket or shank only, though many restaurants also have tendon or a more expensive option with both meat and tendon (“半筋半肉麵”, literally “half tendon half meat noodle”) and occasionally with tripe; 三寶麵, literally “three-treasure noodle”, usually denotes a bowl containing all three. If one orders “牛肉湯麵” or “beef soup noodles” in a restaurant in TaiwanMainland China, or Hong Kong, they might be given a cheaper bowl of noodles in only beef broth but no beef. If one orders a “牛肉湯” or “beef-soup”, they could be given a more expensive bowl of beef broth with chunks of beef in it but without noodles. In Tainan, beef soup (牛肉湯) denotes a distinct and local specialty, where sliced beef is blanched in hot soup and accompanied by shredded ginger.

Beef noodle is often served as fast food in China, with Mr. Lee being the largest chain. In Taiwan it is sometimes considered a national dish and every year the city of Taipei holds an annual Beef Noodle Festival, where various chefs and restaurants compete for the “best beef noodle” title in Taiwan.[4][5] However, some Taiwanese (particularly the elderly generation) still refrain from eating it. A traditional reluctance towards slaughtering precious cattle needed for agriculture, and an emotional attachment and feeling of gratitude and thanks to the animals traditionally used for very hard labour. Due to influences from the influx of out of province Chinese from mainland China in the early 1900s, the Taiwanese version of beef noodle soup is now one of the most popular dishes in Taiwan.[6]

I’ve never reviewed something like this one before – let’s open the box and you’ll see what I’m talking about.

Kiki Sichuan Beef Noodles Soup – Taiwan

#2947: Kiki Sichuan Beef Noodles Soup (台湾KIKI 牛肉面)

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains beef. To prepare, open the beef soup package and pour into the pot, cook for 1 minutes with high heat. Cook the noodles in boiling water separately for 4 to 5 minutes with medium heat. Turn off the heat and drain the noodles. Finally, add noodles and beef soup into a bowl, stir and enjoy!

#2947: Kiki Sichuan Beef Noodles Soup (台湾KIKI 牛肉面)

A package of dry noodles.

#2947: Kiki Sichuan Beef Noodles Soup (台湾KIKI 牛肉面)

Okay, so this is what makes this a lot different and unique from any variety I’ve reviewed yet. This is the soup. This is a very large package – you don’t add water, you just heat it and add in the noodles you’ve cooked and drained separately.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added scallion. The noodles are very good – plentiful on quantity and excellent as far as quality. They had an almost squarish gauge and a very nice chew that I expect from Guanmiao. The broth is very complex – a lot of things going on here. A very tasty beef flavor has notes of herbs and spices – one being Sichuan pepper of course, but it was cooperative rather than a bully in the bowl. The beef and tendon was very good, and of good quantity, but I was left wanting more of it – which I think is natural as it’s quite flavorful. Impressed. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 4713302682039.

#2947: Kiki Sichuan Beef Noodles Soup (台湾KIKI 牛肉面)

A Culinary History of Taipei: Beyond Pork and Ponlai (Big City Food Biographies)

This is the Unboxing Time With The Ramen Rater where I unboxed these – and you can really get a feel for how big this box is

#2917: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Aged Vinegar

#2917: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Aged Vinegar

The last time I reviewed Kiki noodles was quite a while agoi. I remember that I really enjoyed them quite a bit – high quality noodles and good tasty flavor. Well, now they’ve come out with two new dry varieties – this one is aged vinegar and the other has a young vinegar. Sounds interesting to me – let’s give it a try!

Kiki Noodles Mixed With Aged Vinegar – Taiwan

#2917: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Aged Vinegar

The import/distributor’s sticker (click to enlarge).

#2917: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Aged Vinegar

Detail of the package (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add noodles to a pot of boiling water and cook for 3~5 minutes. Drain. Add in sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2917: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Aged Vinegar

One of the five individual packs.

#2917: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Aged Vinegar

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge).

#2917: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Aged Vinegar

The dry noodles.

#2917: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Aged Vinegar

The first of two sachet.

#2917: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Aged Vinegar

Dark stuff.

#2917: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Aged Vinegar

The second liquid sachet.

#2917: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Aged Vinegar

Dark stuff – slightly lighter than the first dark stuff.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added scallions. The noodles were very good – great gauge and excellent chewiness. The flavor was very much black vinegar with a spiciness. The heat didn’t come from Sichuan pepper, I should add. The flavor was augmented with a soy sauce hit as well. Nicely rounded and tasty. 4.75 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 4713302680042.

#2917: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Aged Vinegar

Rilakkuma Pottery Ramen Noodles Bowl W/ Spoon

Watch me conquer a plate of these noodles!

Unboxing Time: New Products From KIKI Noodles Of Taiwan

Unboxing Time: New Products From KIKI Noodles Of Taiwan

You’re probably thinking ‘dang dude, you sure get a lot of samples coming from Taiwan.’ Well, you’re right! The competition in Taiwan is extremely fierce, and people know who I am there, so it makes sense. This box has some tape from TATLTOB, aka  ‘the agency that likes to open boxes that aren’t theirs.’ Hopefully all is intact! Let’s find out!

New Products From KIKI Noodles – Taiwan

A package full of interesting things! Thank you very much – looking forward to trying them!

Meet The Manufacturer: #2478: Kiki Noodles Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle

Meet The Manufacturer: #2478: Kiki Noodles Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi蔥油拌麵

Today we have the second of the Kiki Noodles products – the scallion oil and soy sauce. Definitely a lighter and more mild taste than a Sichuan peppercorn. These noodles come from Tainan in the south of Taiwan. Here’s some background on the city from Wikipedia –

Tainan, officially Tainan City is a special municipality of Taiwan, facing the Taiwan Strait in the west and south. Tainan is the oldest city on the island of Taiwan and also commonly known as the “Capital City” (府城; Fǔchéng; Hú-siâⁿ) for its over 200 years of history as the capital of Taiwan under Koxinga and later Qing dynasty rule. Tainan’s complex history of comebacks, redefinitions and renewals inspired its popular nickname “the Phoenix City”.

Tainan was initially established by the Dutch East India Company as a ruling and trading base called Fort Zeelandia during the period of Dutch rule on Taiwan. After Dutch colonists were defeated by Koxinga in 1661, Tainan remained as the capital of the Tungning Kingdom until 1683 and afterwards the capital of Taiwan Prefecture under Qing Dynasty rule until 1887, when the new provincial capital was moved to Taipei. Tainan has been historically regarded as one of the oldest cities in Taiwan, and its former name, Tayouan, has been claimed to be the origin of the name “Taiwan”. It is also one of Taiwan’s cultural capitals, for its rich folk cultures including the famous local snack food, extensively preserved Taoist rites and other living local traditions covering everything from child birth to funerals. The city houses the first Confucian school–temple, built in 1665,[9] the remains of the Eastern and Southern gates of the old city, and countless other historical monuments. Tainan claims more Buddhist and Taoist temples than any other city in Taiwan.

I can say from experience that Tainan is a really fascinating and amazing place. Indeed, if you visit Taiwan, you really must visit Tainan. Let’s give this second variety by Kiki Noodles a try!

Kiki Noodles Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle – Taiwan

Meet The Manufacturer: #2478: Kiki Noodles Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi蔥油拌麵

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, boil noodles in a pot for 3~5 minutes. Stir to loosen. Drain. Add to bowl and add sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

Meet The Manufacturer: #2478: Kiki Noodles Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi蔥油拌麵

One of the six servings in the large bag.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2478: Kiki Noodles Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi蔥油拌麵

The dry noodles.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2478: Kiki Noodles Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi蔥油拌麵

A liquid sachet.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2478: Kiki Noodles Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi蔥油拌麵

Has a nice scallion scent.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, sliced fishball and spring onion. The noodles are round in gauge and chewy in nature. The flavor is extremely good – definitely soy and scallion here. What I like is that it’s got a nice sweetness along with it. It seems so basic but it’s so tasty! 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. No barcode provided.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2478: Kiki Noodles Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi蔥油拌麵

Kiki Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle

A visit to Tainan, where these noodles come from.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2477: Kiki Noodles Sichuan Spices Flavor Noodle

Meet The Manufacturer: #2477: Kiki Noodles Sichuan Spices Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi椒麻拌麵

Kiki has two products – this one and a scallion oil variety. Sichuan spicy – that’s an interesting kind of peppery taste. Here’s a little about the pepper from Wikipedia –

Sichuan pepper, Sichuan peppercorn, or Chinese coriander, is a commonly used spice in Chinese, Tibetan, Nepali, and Indian cuisine. It is derived from at least two species of the global genus Zanthoxylum, including Z. simulans and Z. bungeanum. The botanical name comes from the Greek xanthon xylon (ξανθὸν ξύλον), meaning “blond wood”. It refers to the brightly coloured sapwood possessed by several of the species. The genus Zanthoxylum belongs in the rue or citrus family, and, despite its name, is not closely related to either black pepper or the chili pepper.

The husk or hull (pericarp) around the seeds may be used whole, especially in Sichuan cuisine, and the finely ground powder is one of the ingredients for five-spice powder. It is also used in traditional Chinese medicine. The pericarp is most often used, but the leaves of various species are also used in some regions of China.[1]

Sichuan pepper’s unique aroma and flavour is not hot or pungent like black, white, or chili peppers. Instead, it has slight lemony overtones and creates a tingly numbness in the mouth (caused by its 3% of hydroxy alpha sanshool) that sets the stage for hot spices. According to Harold McGee in On Food and Cooking, they are not simply pungent; “they produce a strange, tingling, buzzing, numbing sensation that is something like the effect of carbonated drinks or of a mild electric current (touching the terminals of a nine-volt battery to the tongue). Sanshools appear to act on several different kinds of nerve endings at once, induce sensitivity to touch and cold in nerves that are ordinarily nonsensitive, and so perhaps cause a kind of general neurological confusion.”

Yeah to sum up, Sichuan pepper is something very different from say, a jalapeno pepper. It’s interesting stuff! Let’s give this one a try.

Kiki Noodles Sichuan Spices Flavor Noodle – Taiwan

Meet The Manufacturer: #2477: Kiki Noodles Sichuan Spices Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi椒麻拌麵

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, boil noodles in a pot for 3~5 minutes. Stir to loosen. Drain. Add to bowl and add sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

Meet The Manufacturer: #2477: Kiki Noodles Sichuan Spices Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi椒麻拌麵

Six of these bags are in each package.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2477: Kiki Noodles Sichuan Spices Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi椒麻拌麵

The dry noodles.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2477: Kiki Noodles Sichuan Spices Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi椒麻拌麵

A liquid base.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2477: Kiki Noodles Sichuan Spices Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi椒麻拌麵

Has an oiliness and slight sweetness to the scent.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2477: Kiki Noodles Sichuan Spices Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi椒麻拌麵

A sachet of Sichuan pepper.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2477: Kiki Noodles Sichuan Spices Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi椒麻拌麵

This is quite a lot of it – curious to see how spicy it is.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, chicken baked with Kiki seasoning and Salt For Life, sweet onion, red bell pepper and sesame seeds. The Noodles are thin with a great chew to them. The flavor is excellent – there’s a sweetness and a fire! I really like how the pepper is in a sachet – gives one the option for how hot they like their noodles. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. oodles. No barcode provided.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2477: Kiki Sichuan Spices Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi椒麻拌麵

Kiki Sichuan Spices Flavor Noodle

A visit to Kiki Restaurant in Taiwan.

Meet The Manufacturer: Product Samples From Kiki Noodles 2

So the samples in the first box got a little banged up, so they sent some more. I see the tape of doom… Let’s see how they did!

Product Samples From Kiki Noodles – Taiwan

A sturdy box and lots of padding!

Oh great (click to enlarge)…. More of the tape of doom…

Phew (click to enlarge)!!! Luckily, the tapers of doom were kind and repackages them safe and sound and didn’t tear open the packs. Hooray! Thank you!

Meet The Manufacturer: Product Samples From Kiki Noodles 1

Meet The Manufacturer: Product Samples From Kiki Noodles 1

A package! Let’s open it up!

Product Samples From Kiki Noodles – Taiwan

Meet The Manufacturer: Product Samples From Kiki Noodles 1

Two packages (click to enlarge)!

Meet The Manufacturer: Product Samples From Kiki Noodles 1

A pack of the spicy variety (click to enlarge).

Meet The Manufacturer: Product Samples From Kiki Noodles 1

In the box, a bowl (click to enlarge)!

Meet The Manufacturer: Product Samples From Kiki Noodles 1

Also a container (click to enlarge)…

Meet The Manufacturer: Product Samples From Kiki Noodles 1

Aha (click to enlarge) – seasoning! Thank you!