Tag Archives: flavored

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Sapporo Ichiban Japanese Style Noodles & Shrimp Flavored Soup

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Sapporo Ichiban Japanese Style Noodles & Shrimp Flavored Soup

Today, we head to the second half of this series with the shrimp pack version. Cups and packs, packs and cups. As you may remember, I was pretty impressed by the cup version. I’ve tasted shrimp flavor instant noodles in a few different ways. Sometimes, it’s kind of like as buttery broth which doesn’t taste like shrimp, but one that shrimp may go well in. – kind of the way that oyster sauce doesn’t taste like oysters. The cup version with this brand has a nice sweetness that you find in shrimp. Let’s see how it translates to the pack version.

Sapporo Ichiban Japanese Style Noodles & Shrimp Flavored Soup – United States

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Sapporo Ichiban Japanese Style Noodles & Shrimp Flavored Soup

Here’s the back of the packaging (click to enlarge). Contains chicken and shrimp. To prepare, add noodle block to 500ml boiling water and cook for 3 minutes. Remove from heat and add in sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Sapporo Ichiban Japanese Style Noodles & Shrimp Flavored Soup

The noodle block.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Sapporo Ichiban Japanese Style Noodles & Shrimp Flavored Soup

The soup base sachet.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Sapporo Ichiban Japanese Style Noodles & Shrimp Flavored Soup

A light powder.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added shrimp, spring onion and Salad Cosmo organic mung bean sprouts. The noodles came out really well. The flavor wasn’t as good as the cup version, however it was very good. 3.5 out of 5.0 stars.  UPC bar code 076186000059.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Sapporo Ichiban Japanese Style Noodles & Shrimp Flavored Soup

S a p p o r o   I c h i b a n  Japanese Style Noodles and Shrimp Flavored Soup, 3.5-Ounce (Pack of 24)

Do you like shrimp? Do you like big shrimp? The mantis shrimp/mantis prawn is a big one. An interesting thing to know is that they eat clams – they smack them with such force t hat they crack their shells open. Pretty impressive.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Sapporo Ichiban Japanese Style Noodles & Beef Flavored Soup

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Sapporo Ichiban Japanese Style Noodles & Beef Flavored Soup

Beef flavor isn’t usually something I think of when I think about ramen. I generally think of pork, chicken, fish, seaweed, etc. Beef leads me more towards ramyun to be honest. But these are varieties catering to the taste of the United States – and beef is definitely a western kind of flavor as well. Let’s see how a beef noodle goes in this variety. Looks like I did a re-review ion 2017 and the first time I reviewed it was #205 in 2010! Okay – let’s get to it!

Sapporo Ichiban Japanese Style Noodles & Beef Flavored Soup – United States

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Sapporo Ichiban Japanese Style Noodles & Beef Flavored Soup

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). To prepare, add noodle block to 500ml boiling water and cook for 3 minutes. Take off heat and add sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Sapporo Ichiban Japanese Style Noodles & Beef Flavored Soup

The noodle block.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Sapporo Ichiban Japanese Style Noodles & Beef Flavored Soup

The soup base sachet.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Sapporo Ichiban Japanese Style Noodles & Beef Flavored Soup

Smells beefy!

Finished (click to enlarge). Added thin sliced roast Angus beef, Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, cilantro, and hard boiled egg. Noodles have a nice thickness to them as always – it’s like they get engorged on the broth but maintain their character. The beef flavor is simply superb – I’m going to say as far as just being a beef instant noodle, these are definitely among my favorites. 4.25 out of 5,.0 stars. UPC bar code 076186000035.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Sapporo Ichiban Japanese Style Noodles & Beef Flavored Soup

S a p p o r o   I c h i b a n, Beef, 3.5-Ounce Packages (Pack of 24)

Vintage Sapporo Ichiban TV spots from Japan

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Sapporo Ichiban Japanese Style Noodles & Original Flavored Soup

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Sapporo Ichiban Japanese Style Noodles & Original Flavored Soup

Thought starting things off with the original variety would make sense. So they told me that original flavor indeed was soy sauce, which also is known as shoyu ramen. Here’s a little about shoyu ramen from Wikipedia

Shōyu (醤油, “soy sauce”) ramen is the oldest of the four, it has a clear brown broth, based on a chicken and vegetable (or sometimes fish or beef) stock with plenty of soy sauce added resulting in a soup that is tangy, salty, and savory yet still fairly light on the palate. Shōyu ramen usually has curly noodles rather than straight ones, but this is not always the case. It is often adorned with marinated bamboo shoots or menma, green onions, kamaboko(fish cakes), nori (seaweed), boiled eggs, bean sprouts or black pepper; occasionally the soup will also contain chili oil or Chinese spices, and some shops serve sliced beef instead of the usual chāshū.

Alright – let’s kick things off!

Sapporo Ichiban Japanese Style Noodles & Original Flavored Soup – United States

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Sapporo Ichiban Japanese Style Noodles & Original Flavored Soup

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains chicken. To prepare, boil noodles in 500ml water for 3 minutes. Remove from heat and add seasoning sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Sapporo Ichiban Japanese Style Noodles & Original Flavored Soup

The noodle block.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Sapporo Ichiban Japanese Style Noodles & Original Flavored Soup

The soup base sachet.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Sapporo Ichiban Japanese Style Noodles & Original Flavored Soup

A decent amount of powder.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added organic Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, hard boiled egg, chashu pork, spring onion, sesame seed and shichimi togarashi. Noodles were your standard curly instant – except better. Gauge was slightly wider. Also, the chew was on point and very nice. The broth was definitely a shoyu – rich and tasty. A surprise here – very impressed. 4.25 out of 5.0 stars.  UPC bar code 076186000011.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Sapporo Ichiban Japanese Style Noodles & Original Flavored Soup

S a p p o r o   I c h i b a n  Ramen Noodles, Original, 3.50 Ounce (Pack of 24)

A vintage TV spot for Sapporo Ichiban

#2588: Sau Tao Ho Fan Tomato Soup Flavored

#2513: Sau Tao Ho Fan Tomato Soup Flavored - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater

Here’s another one sent by Colin from Massachusetts – thanks again! So this is a Hong Kong variety. Let’s see if I can find something on Wikipedia about Ho Fan –

While shahe fen and he fen are transliterations based on Mandarin, there are numerous other transliterations based on Cantonese, which include ho fun, hofoen (a Dutch transliteration in Suriname), hor fun, sar hor fun, etc. In addition, shahe fen is often synonymously called kway teow (粿條), literally “ricecake strips”, transliteration based on Min Nan Chinese, POJ: kóe-tiâu) or guotiao (Mandarin pinyin: guǒtiáo), as in the name of a dish called char kway teow. However, shahe fen and kway teow are strictly and technically not the same (the latter being essentially ricecakes sliced into strips) and the Min Nans in general still consciously make a distinction between shahe fen and kway teow in their speech. Original ricecakes or its strips are very stiff in texture (even after cooking), making them unpopular with modern consumers.

It is also known in Sabah as da fen (大粉), means “wide vermicelli“, due to its similarity of colour and texture to rice vermicelli.

These noodles are called guay tiew sen yai (Thai: เส้นใหญ่, meaning “large rice noodles”) in Thailand, and kwetiau in Indonesia.

I *think* these are the same thing. With that, let’s dig in!

Sau Tao Ho Fan Tomato Soup Flavored – Hong Kong

#2513: Sau Tao Ho Fan Tomato Soup Flavored - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add noodles to 600ml boiling water. Cook for 2 minutes then add sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2513: Sau Tao Ho Fan Tomato Soup Flavored - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater

The noodle block.

#2513: Sau Tao Ho Fan Tomato Soup Flavored - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater

The dry sachet.

#2513: Sau Tao Ho Fan Tomato Soup Flavored - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater

Smells like tomato.

#2513: Sau Tao Ho Fan Tomato Soup Flavored - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater

A seasoned oil sachet.

#2513: Sau Tao Ho Fan Tomato Soup Flavored - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater

Orange in color, that’s for sure.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added a little shredded chicken. The noodles are broad and flat. They are chewy, but not overly so. The broth has a tomato flavor, although is extremely thin. 2.5 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 087303862757.

#2513: Sau Tao Ho Fan Tomato Soup Flavored - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater

Sao Tao – Chicken & Abalone Sichuan Noodle Soup 5.6 Oz (Pack of 1)

A cooking video.

#2357: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Wonton Soup Flavoured

#2357: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Wonton Soup Flavoured - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - wanton mee - instant noodles

Got this bowl quite a while back – I’ve got lots of new varieties and still trying to clear out the ones that are close to expiration! So let’s ask Wikipedia about wonton noodles –

Wonton noodles (pinyin: Yúntūn miàn; Cantonese Yale: wàhn tān mihn, sometimes called wanton mee (“wanton” is a Cantonese word for dumpling while noodles in Hokkien is “mee” or in Cantonese, “min”) is a Cantonese noodle dish which is popular in Guangzhou, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand. The dish is usually served in a hot broth, garnished with leafy vegetables, and wonton dumplings. The types of leafy vegetables are usually kai-lan also known as Chinese kale. Another type of dumpling known as shui jiao is sometimes in place of wonton. It contains prawns, chicken or pork, spring onions with some chefs adding mushroom and black fungus.

In Hong Kong and Guangzhou, wonton noodles are usually in steaming hot soup with shrimp wontons and with leafy vegetables.[1] There are plenty of variations of this popular Cantonese dish, with different toppings and garnishes. For example, the soup and wontons in a separate bowl, the noodles being served relatively dry, with the toppings and garnishes, dressed with sauce, dipping the noodles in the soup to eat it.

There are four distinct features: First, the wontons are predominantly prawn, with small amounts of minced pork, or no pork at all. Second, aficionados will insist on fresh, smooth thin noodles which are al dente, free from the taste and odor which is characteristic in many egg noodles when cooked. Third, the bouillon is light brown (prepared from dried flounder) and is usually steaming hot. Lastly, garlic chives are used as a garnish. The first two give the dish a wet but crunchy or crispy mouthfeel. The last two give the dish a unique bouquet.

In order to ensure that the noodles are perfectly al dente and free from “noodley” taste, the cooking process and sequence must be meticulously adhered to. The wonton is cooked first, and then placed in the bowl. The noodles are blanched for only 10 seconds, after which they are rinsed under cold water and placed in the serving bowl. Piping hot bouillon is then scooped into the bowl, on top of the wonton noodles. The bouillon must be tasty, yet not so strong as to overpower the delicate taste of the wonton and the noodles which it is meant to accompany.[2]

When served, the spoon must be placed at the bottom, with the wontons above the spoon and the noodles on top. Because if the noodles soak in the soup for too long then it will be over cooked, this is strictly adhered to by the best wonton noodle establishments.

Although the “wonton noodle” is synonymous with wonton and noodles in piping hot bouillon, the dish may also be “dry”, as in lo mein (撈麵), where the wonton are on a large bed of noodles.

Let’s give this wonton noodle variety from Hong Kong a look.

Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Wonton Soup Flavoured – Hong Kong

#2357: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Wonton Soup Flavoured - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - wanton mee - instant noodles

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains fish. To prepare, add boiling water to fill line as well as all the sachets. Let steep covered for 3-4 minutes. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2357: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Wonton Soup Flavoured - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - wanton mee - instant noodles

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2357: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Wonton Soup Flavoured - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - wanton mee - instant noodles

An included fork!

#2357: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Wonton Soup Flavoured - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - wanton mee - instant noodles

The noodle block.

#2357: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Wonton Soup Flavoured - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - wanton mee - instant noodles

The dry soup base sachet.

#2357: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Wonton Soup Flavoured - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - wanton mee - instant noodles

A light colored powder with flecks of herbs.

#2357: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Wonton Soup Flavoured - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - wanton mee - instant noodles

The vegetables sachet.

#2357: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Wonton Soup Flavoured - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - wanton mee - instant noodles

A colorful mixture.

#2357: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Wonton Soup Flavoured - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - wanton mee - instant noodles

An oil sachet.

#2357: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Wonton Soup Flavoured - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - wanton mee - instant noodles

A yellow oil.

#2357: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Wonton Soup Flavoured - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - wanton mee - instant noodles

Finished (click to enlarge). Added fish ball and spring onion. So the noodles are very chewy with a very unique crumble. Indeed, they are very hearty and good. The broth has a very nice taste and body – good oiliness and a perfect compliment for the noodle. Finally, the vegetables included were mostly corn and seaweed which hydrated to perfection. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 6920363400696.

#2357: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Wonton Soup Flavoured - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - wanton mee - instant noodles

The Hong Kong cookbook;: A new kind of authentic Chinese cookery adapted to the American kitchen,

A walk around a Hong Kong street market.

#2193: Knorr Chicken Flavored Instant Noodles

Here’s one that Marvin R. sent me from Fort Worth, Texas recently – thank you! Knorr’s a pretty worldwide brand of Unilever. These are from Pakistan! Anyways, let’s have a look at these and give ’em a try!

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add noodles and seasoning to 2 cups boiling water. Stir for 2 minutes as the water is at a rolling boil. Stir and enjoy!

The noodle block.

The soup base sachet.

A light mixture.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added coriander, hard boiled egg and baked chicken. the noodles came out alright – decent gauge but very soft. The broth was thin but had an off chicken flavor to them. 2.5 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 8961014177701.

The Food and Cooking of Pakistan: Traditional Dishes From The Home Kitchen

Knorr Pakistan foes all out and does full length feature cartoons!

#2032: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Beef Soup Flavored

A couple of months ago, I experienced an instant noodle drought. I was looking in my hampers and there were maybe 10 varieties left! We hit 99 Ranch and I found about 10 or so varieties to review (later after putting a call out on the site, I ended up with people sending all sorts of varieties and now my hampers runneth over – my thanks!). Here’s one I found at 99 Ranch – let’s check it out.

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add in all sachet contents and fill to line with boiling water. Let stand covered for 3-4 minutes. Stir and enjoy!

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

The noodle block.

A powder soup base sachet.

Smells beefy!

A paste sachet.

An oily concoction.

The vegetables sachet.

A nice selection.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added coriander, beef, sweet onion and crushed red pepper. The noodles are more easily enjoyed with a couple of crosscuts with a pair of kitchen scissors as the are particularly long. They have a a very dense nature and robust chewiness. The broth indeed has a beef flavor but isn’t extremely strong. The included vegetables hydrated quite nicely – especially the corn which was nice and sweet. 3.75 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 6920363400689.

Instant Noodle Wonton (Beef Flavor) – 82g

A short film about Shenzhen, China – the city where these noodles are produced.

#1660: Sau Tao Ho Fan Wonton Soup Flavored

I’ve reviewed a few of these Hong Kong instant rice noodles in the past, but never looked up the meaning of Ho Fan. I did some research and found this on wikipedia:

While shahe fen and he fen are transliterations based on Mandarin, there are numerous other transliterations based on Cantonese, which include ho fen, hofen, ho-fen, ho fun, ho-fun, hofoen (a Dutch transliteration in Suriname), hor fun, hor fen, sar hor fun, etc. In addition, shahe fen is often synonymously called kway teow (粿條), literally “ricecake strips”, transliteration based on Min Nan Chinese, POJ: kóe-tiâu) or guotiao(pinyin: guǒtiáo; the corresponding transliteration of Mandarin), as in the name of a dish called char kway teow. However, shahe fen and kway teow are strictly and technically not the same (the latter being essentially ricecakes sliced into strips) and the Min Nans in general still consciously make a distinction between shahe fen and kway teow in their speech. Original ricecakes or its strips are very stiff in texture (even after cooking), making them unpopular with modern consumers.

Sounds like what we’re looking at here. Let’s check out this Sau Tao Ho Fan!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Contains fish. To prepare, add noodle block to 600ml boiling water and cook 2 minutes, stirring gently. Add in sachet contents and stir. Enjoy!

The noodle block.

The powder soup base.

Has a prawn scent.

The seasoned oil sachet.

Oily!

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added fishball and coriander. The noodles are very wide and flat and made of rice. They are slippery but have a nice texture to them – good stuff. The broth was on the light bland side; could of used a little more something or a little less than the directed amount of water for my taste. 3.0 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 087303861521.

HoFan Wonton Noodle Soup 2.6 Oz

A Sau Tao noodle TV commercial.

#1363: Sau Tao Instant Noodle King Wonton Soup Flavor

I think most people think of wonton soup and think of what they find in Chinese restaurants in the United States. Usually a thin broth, maybe a glass noodle or two and some little dumplings with meat inside. Well, I have a feeling that’s more geared to the American palate. Just look at the picture on the front of this package; whole head-on shrimps well as mushrooms too. Looks really good! Let’s see what this Sau Tao variety is like.

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Contains flounder powder. To prepare, boil 600cc water. Add noodles and cook for a minute and a half. Add sachet contents, stir, and enjoy. What’s kind of interesting here is that the instructions mention the words ‘take out.’ I’ve seen this before as meaning to drain the water off, but I’m hoping that’s not the case here. In the end, I couldn’t imagine eating these noodles without soup; they’d be unpalatably salty and oily, so I’m going to say if these had been meat to be served soupless, they’d have gotten zero stars.

The noodle block. Thin, wispy noodles.

The soup base powder sachet.

Has a strong seafood scent.

A chilli oil sachet.

Smells good!

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added sweet onion and shrimp. The noodles were thin and almost a little dry even though swimming in broth. They had a texture I didn’t like; chewy, yes but almost crumbly; non-elastic. The broth on the other hand was excellent. A very nice balance of a seafood broth and slight heat from the chilli oil was very nice. 2.75 out of 5.0 stars.UPC bar code 087303860609.

Here’s a recipe for shrimp wonton soup.

#1246: Annie Chun’s Ramen House Chicken Vegetable Flavored Ramen

Here’s one of the new varieties from Annie Chun’s that they sent! It’s 22 degrees outside – very cold! This looks appropriate for such a cold day – let’s check it out!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Looks to be meat-free and a lot of natural ingredients. Lower calorie/fat as well. To prepare, cook noodles in 1 1/2 cups water for 1 minute. Drain water and boil another pot of water, 1 cup this time. Add the liquid sachet. Put the cooked noodles in a bowl and then add the broth.

The fresh noodles.

Liquid soup base sachet.

Has a nice chicken vegetable scent.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added baked chicken, broccoli, big ugly carrot, leeks, sweet onion and green onion. The noodles are reminiscent in texture of South Korean fresj udon cups – then again the noodles in those generally come in the same package. Yet these are much thinner than udon and have a slightly bouncy chew and good texture. The broth has a slightly sweet and full vegetable flavor which goes well with the noodle. The interaction between noodle and broth leaves me with a fresh and premium feel. 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.UPC bar code 765667140505.

Here’s an Annie Chun’s TV advert.

#1218: Sau Tao Ho Fan Beef Soup Flavour

Here’s one I got up at T&T Supermarket up in Canada in July. So what is Ho Fan? Well, they’re simply very wide flat rice noodles. Let’s check ’em out!

Here’s the import sticker (click image to enlarge). Looks to be meat-free but check for yourself.

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). To cook this one, put the noodle in 600cc of boiling water. Cook it for 2 minutes, then add the contents of the two sachets, stir, and it’s ready.

The noodle block.

The soup base sachet.

Has a slightly acrid scent.

The liquid base sachet.

A paste with a nice beef scent.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added sauteed beef and sweet onion doused with a little garlic salt. The noodles are very wide and flat. They’re the kind of rice noodles I like the best – not overly chewy, and somewhat comforty. What’s more there’s a decent amount of them. The broth is pretty good – has a great beef flavor and a bit of heartiness from the oil. Has a little of that sweet braised beef flavor a lot of Chinese instants have. 3.75 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 087303861545.

This is pretty neat – the grand opening of the first Sau Tao store!

Re-Review: Sapporo Ichiban Japanese Style Noodles & Original Flavored Soup

We went to Walmart on Black Friday! Well, let me explain – it was at 6pm or so, so the amount of crazy people was lower. It seems though that the Walmart we always go to has a surplus of crazy people usually. I imagine the early morning Black Friday folks would’ve been a scary lot. One thing I noticed was that they hadn’t bought all of the noodles, so I thought I’d get a couple to re-review. Here’s one of them last time I tried it, it was revirew #207. Hoping some new things to review come soon – only have one in the hamper that’s needing review… Re-reviews are fun though since they’re not been visited in so long.

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge).

The noodle block. Decently sized with a little more weight than I usually find in domestic packs. The noodles when sampled uncooked are a little different too – pretty good.

The lone seasoning packet.

The seasoning powder. Kind of has a soy flavor to it; I would think this one’s a soy sauce noodle perhaps?

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added stir fry veggies, hard boiled egg with Cavender’s Greek Seasoning, Thanksgiving turkey (the very last bits of it) and some Urashima Sesame & Salt furikake. The noodles are good – large amoung and decent gauge. The broth is good too – strong soy and salt flavor. Good stuff! 3.5 out of 5.0 stars! UPC bar code 076186000011 – get it here!

Some older Sapporo Ichiban commercials

Looks like Sapporo Ichiban Shio Ramen has been around for a while – glad they finally brought it to the US!