Tag Archives: beehoon

#2584: MyKuali Penang White Curry Rice Vermicelli Soup

#2584: MyKuali Penang White Curry Rice Vermicelli Soup - Bihun Kari Putih - beehoon - The Ramen Rater - Malaysia

This is the third of the rice vermicelli (bihun) varieties that MyKuali has come out with in cups. I was very surprised yesterday – happily so. They now have them at the 99 Ranch store near me – all of their pack range, the rice vermicelli bowls and the cup versions as well. Pretty surprised to see them actually – but it’s a good thing since it seems Malaysian flavors are really making a big punch into the outer world.

As you might remember, MyKuali’s Penang White Curry wheat noodle version was #1 on the top ten list in 2014. As for the rice vermicelli varieties, they hit #1 and #2 of my top ten rice noodles for 2017 with their Hokkien OPrawn and Tom Yum varieties. Let’s have a look at this one!

MyKuali Penang White Curry Rice Vermicelli Soup – Malaysia

#2584: MyKuali Penang White Curry Rice Vermicelli Soup - Bihun Kari Putih - beehoon - The Ramen Rater - Malaysia

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains prawn. To prepare, add all four sachets to the bowl and add 400ml boiling water. Put lid on and steep for 4 minutes. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2584: MyKuali Penang White Curry Rice Vermicelli Soup - Bihun Kari Putih - beehoon - The Ramen Rater - Malaysia

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2584: MyKuali Penang White Curry Rice Vermicelli Soup - Bihun Kari Putih - beehoon - The Ramen Rater - Malaysia

An included fork – and spoon!

#2584: MyKuali Penang White Curry Rice Vermicelli Soup - Bihun Kari Putih - beehoon - The Ramen Rater - Malaysia

The rice vermicelli block.

#2584: MyKuali Penang White Curry Rice Vermicelli Soup - Bihun Kari Putih - beehoon - The Ramen Rater - Malaysia

The powder seasoning base.

#2584: MyKuali Penang White Curry Rice Vermicelli Soup - Bihun Kari Putih - beehoon - The Ramen Rater - Malaysia

A light powder.

#2584: MyKuali Penang White Curry Rice Vermicelli Soup - Bihun Kari Putih - beehoon - The Ramen Rater - Malaysia

Another dry sachet.

#2584: MyKuali Penang White Curry Rice Vermicelli Soup - Bihun Kari Putih - beehoon - The Ramen Rater - Malaysia

Non-dairy creamer.

#2584: MyKuali Penang White Curry Rice Vermicelli Soup - Bihun Kari Putih - beehoon - The Ramen Rater - Malaysia

The garnish sachet.

#2584: MyKuali Penang White Curry Rice Vermicelli Soup - Bihun Kari Putih - beehoon - The Ramen Rater - Malaysia

Dehydrated chives and chilli.

#2584: MyKuali Penang White Curry Rice Vermicelli Soup - Bihun Kari Putih - beehoon - The Ramen Rater - Malaysia

The paste sachet.

#2584: MyKuali Penang White Curry Rice Vermicelli Soup - Bihun Kari Putih - beehoon - The Ramen Rater - Malaysia

Thick and dark.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion, Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, fishball and tofu puff. The vermicelli came out just right – good hydration in the time specified. As usual, I did a couple of cross cuts with a pair of kitchen scissors to make them more manageable with a fork. The broth is thick and luxuriant. It’s very dark and has a strong garlic overtone. When I first tried their white curry in 2013, it was much different. It definitely had less garlic and although I love garlic, it kind of gives everything a kind of monotone hit which really bums me out. Howver, there’s a lot to it and it’s as rich as can be. It’s still one of my favorite flavors though. The included garnish hydrated well – chives and chilli. 4.75 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 9555655005333.

#2584: MyKuali Penang White Curry Rice Vermicelli Soup - Bihun Kari Putih - beehoon - The Ramen Rater - Malaysia

M y K u a l i   Rice Vermicelli Soup Pack of 12 With FREE Natural Wood Chopstick (Penang White Curry)

A short piece about the company

The Ramen Rater’s Top Ten Instant Rice Noodles Of All Time 2017 Edition

Now for the third year, I’m coming out with the latest Top Ten Instant Rice Noodles list. Rice noodles have some benefits as opposed to their fried wheat counterparts. First, they’re virtually fat-free. Also, they’re not fried. Rice noodles are gluten-free by nature, although the ingredients in the sachets that come with these varieties might not be. People ask me for a gluten-free list often, but that would be rather difficult as I’d have to pore over every ingredient list on every review to do this. Well, let’s have a look at these great rice noodle varieties – the best instant rice noodles varieties of the almost 2,500 reviews to date!

The Ramen Rater’s Top Ten Instant Rice Noodles Of All Time 2017 Edition

The list’s video presentation.

#10:Vifon Viet Cuisine Bun Rieu Cua Sour Crab Soup Instant Rice Vermicelli – Vietnam

#10:Vifon Viet Cuisine Bun Rieu Cua Sour Crab Soup Instant Rice Vermicelli - Vietnam - The Ramen Rater - instant rice noodles

The instant rice noodles came out of the microwave slightly underdone, but that was easy to look past as by the time I sat down to eat this, they were very good. Light chew, thin gauge. The broth was very, very good – a nice oiliness and crab taste with lots of crab in there and vegetable. Original review

#9: KOKA Silk Spicy Marinara Instant Rice Fettuccine – Singapore

#9: KOKA Silk Spicy Marinara Instant Rice Fettuccine - Singapore - The Ramen Rater - instant rice noodles

The instant rice noodles – fettuccine – came out remarkably well. Indeed it is perfectly hydrated. I make a couple cross-cuts with a pair of kitchen scissors to make them easier to work with a fork. The broth is very tasty with a fresh taste of tomato and a bit of spiciness. Moreover, the broth definitely has a seafood feel to it – almost has a slight lemony hint to it. The vegetables hydrated very well and were complimentary. Also,m the shrimp that are included taste good and are of a decent quantity. Original review

#8: Nissin Seafood Flavour Rice Vermicelli – Hong Kong

#8: Nissin Seafood Flavour Rice Vermicelli - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - instant rice noodles

The noodles were slightly thick and chewier than many – and it worked well here; a little heartier. The broth was very good – a milky seafood and butter kind of taste which was absolutely delicious. The included bits included scrambled egg, spring onion, mushroom and seafood which all hydrated perfectly. Well done! – Original review

#7: Mamee Chef Gold Recipe Bihun Kari Seribu Rasa – Malaysia

#7: Mamee Chef Gold Recipe Bihun Kari Seribu Rasa – Malaysia - The Ramen Rater - instant rice noodles

The Mamee Chef Gold Recipe on the 2015 Edition of the Top Ten Instant Noodles list, but with bihun! The noodles have a slight dryness to them, but the best part is how the broth is so rich and flavorful; it’s like a bowl of Malaysian love. Original review

#6: Ah Lai Penang Favourite White Curry Rice Vermicelli – Malaysia

#6: Ah Lai Penang Favourite White Curry Rice Vermicelli – Malaysia - The Ramen Rater - instant rice noodles

I found I liked this vermicelli version of their white curry better than their wheat noodle variety! I don’t think that’s happened before; it’s kind of been a love/hate relationship I’ve had with rice based noodles for years. However, the rich flavor of the broth embraces the noodles and enrobes them in curry happiness. Original review

#5: MeeKuali Bihun Sup Rempah Perisa Daging – Malaysia

#5: MeeKuali Bihun Sup Rempah Perisa Daging - Malaysia - The Ramen Rater - instant rice noodles

The vermicelli came out really good. This and cooked nicely. I made a couple of cross cuts with a pair of kitchen scissors to make the vermicelli more manageable. The broth is great . It’s got a great beef flavor and definitely full of spices. Moreover, it has the thickness I like. The shallots pull it together well – crisp and tasty. Original review

#4: Tseng Rice Noodle Seafood Laksa Flavour – Taiwan

#4: Tseng Rice Noodle Seafood Laksa Flavour - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - instant rice noodles

The noodle was great – a little thicker than the other rice noodle varieties from Tseng. A little heartier which worked well here. The broth was a luxuriant sea of deep orange with a good coconut body. The flavor was not extremely strong in this one, but it was satisfying and quite good. Impressed at this being a Laksa coming from Taiwan. Original review

#3: MAMA Instant Rice Noodle Soup Spicy Shrimp Flavour – Thailand

#3: MAMA Instant Rice Noodle Soup Spicy Shrimp Flavour – Thailand - The Ramen Rater - instant rice noodles

The noodles are very good – broad in nature and light in chewiness. The broth is really quite good – it has a spicy, lemongrass flavor with a nice shrimp hit, plus a sweetness as well that I wasn’t expecting. The little shrimp are in there as well, which hydrated quite nicely. Very pleased indeed! Original review

#2: MyKuali Penang Red Tom Yum Goong Rice Vermicelli Soup – Malaysia

#2: MyKuali Penang Red Tom Yum Goong Rice Vermicelli Soup - Malaysia - The Ramen Rater - instant rice noodles

The vermicelli came out nice – not too chewy and very plentiful. I used a pair of kitchen scissors to make 3 cross cuts in order to make them more manageable with a fork. The broth is a sea of flavor. So it has a strong lemongrass presence coupled with a serious spiciness. The shrimp taste is strong here and the broth is thick – really thick. The included garnish was excellent and hydrated perfectly. Original review

#1: MyKuali Penang Hokkien Prawn Soup Rice Vermicelli (Bihun) – Malaysia

#1: MyKuali Penang Hokkien Prawn Soup Rice Vermicelli (Bihun) – Malaysia - The Ramen Rater - instant rice noodles

The bihun as hydrated really well for something steeped. The broth is mind blowing. If you like a thick and serious onslaught of prawny sweetness and heat, this is absolutely for you. It’s so rich and strong and tasty! To top it all off, fried onion bits that are the best I’ve ever had in any instant product – other than the wheat noodle package version of this product. Amazing! Original review

#2264: Unif Tung-I Instant Vegetarian Beehoon Rice Vermicelli

I think I should explain the symbol in the upper right hand corner before anything else. While the symbol may bring up thoughts of World War II, this actually has nothing to do with oppression; this is a Buddhist symbol denoting that it is safe for those who practice strict vegetarianism. Here’s a little from wikipedia about it:

In China, Korea and Vietnam, monks are expected to abstain from meat. In Taiwan, Buddhist monks, nuns, and most lay followers eat no animal products or the fetid vegetables – traditionally garlic, Allium chinense, asafoetida, shallot, and Allium victorialis (victory onion or mountain leek), although in modern times this rule is often interpreted to include other vegetables of the oniongenus, as well as coriander – this is called Su vegetarianism. Some Zhaijiao lay adherents do not eat any meat.

As for the symbol, it is considered an ancient symbol of auspiciousness in Hindu and Buddhist culture. It is immediately recognizable in the West however with Nazi Germany. Here’s some about that –

At the end of 20th century, and early 21st century, confusion and controversy has occurred when consumer goods bearing the Buddhist symbol have been exported to North America, and mistakenly interpreted by Western consumers as a Nazi symbol.

When a ten-year-old boy in Lynbrook, New York, bought a set of Pokémoncards imported from Japan in 1999, two of the cards contained the left-facing Buddhist swastika. The boy’s parents misinterpreted the symbol as a Nazi swastika, which is right-facing with 45 degree rotation, and filed a complaint to the manufacturer. Nintendo of America announced that the cards would be discontinued, explaining that what was acceptable in one culture was not necessarily so in another; their action was welcomed by the Anti-Defamation League who recognised that there was no intention to be offensive but said that international commerce meant that “isolating [the Swastika] in Asia would just create more problems”.[135]

In 2002, Christmas crackers containing plastic toy red pandas sporting swastikas were pulled from shelves after complaints from consumers in Canada. The manufacturer, based in China, said the symbol was presented in a traditional sense and not as a reference to the Nazis, and apologized to the customers for the cross-cultural mixup.[136] In 2007, Spanish fashion chain Zara withdrew a handbag from its stores after a customer in Britain complained swastikas were embroidered on it. The bags were made by a supplier in India and inspired by commonly used Hindu symbols, which include the swastika.[137]

I think it’s a little sad that instances such as this could have been times when the public in the West could have been made to understand that this symbol has been used by religions to denote auspiciousness and vegetarianism for a lot longer than in WWII. But instead of learning, it gets pulled from sight in the marketplace. Let’s give this vegetarian rice vermicelli a try.

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Does not contains meat. To prepare, add package contents to a bowl and add 500ml boiling water. Cover for 2 minutes. Stir and enjoy!

The rice vermicelli.

A dry base sachet.

Powder and vegetables.

An oil sachet.

Smells like sesame oil.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts and tofu puff. The vermicelli didn’t hydrated as it should have in two minutes and was a little stiff and kind of had that dry spiderweb kind of quality I dislike. The broth was nicely accommodated by seaweed but the sesame oil and earthy flavor just didn’t work for me at all. 0.5 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 8888217006105.

Buddhism in Taiwan: Religion and the State, 1660-1990

A little short showing fun in Taiwan.

#1694: MAMA Instant Rice Vermicelli Bihun Goreng Original Flavor

I’m sure many of you are familiar with Mi Goreng. For those of you who aren’t, Mi Goreng translates to ‘fried noodle.’ Mi Goreng basically are noodles that are cooked, drained, dropped in a wok or skillet, and fried with different seasonings and ingredients. Now Bihun Goreng is a little different. Instead of a wheat noodle, rice vermicelli is used the same kind of way. Rice vermicelli are very thin rice noodles. Instead of broth, these are broth free. They’re kind of distant cousins of yakisoba, yakiudon and chow mein. Let’s check out this Bihun Goreng from MAMA of Thailand!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, put noodle block into a bowl and cover with boiling water for 3 minutes. Drain. Add in sachet contents and combine well. Enjoy!

The rice vermicelli block.

The dry seasoning.

Has a kind of salty and sweet scent.

An oil sachet.

Definitely smell some garlic!

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added spring onion, shrimp and white onion with some Healthy Boy brand soy sauce, hard boiled egg with Nguang Soon Dried Chilli Powder and some coriander. The noodles hydrated very nicely during the steeping process. Not too dry and had a substantial chew to them. I also would recommend using some kitchen scissors on them to do a couple cuts to make the length a little shorter – a trick I picked up from the first time I tried South Korean potato noodles. . The have a very nice flavor – sweet, salty and spicy. The spiciness definitely builds to a really exuberant crescendo! Great flavor and texture! 4.75 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 8851876000234.

Interested in using some rice vermicelli? It’s much lower in fat and sodium than tradition fried instant noodles and works well in many recipes! Instant Rice Vermicelli Noodles (Pack of 3)

A really great recipe to try out with MAMA rice vermicelli!

Ah Lai Bihun Samples

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Wasn’t sure what this box was that I received yesterday contained… Hmmm…

Ah! Ah Lai Penang White Curry! I reviewed this a while back – but this is the bihun version. Bihun (or beehoon) is the Malay name for rice vermicelli. Very curious about this one – will try it soon! Thanks!

#1639: Pama Bihun Creamy Tom Yam Flavour

Bihun (or beehoon) is basically rice vermicelli. Pama is a brand by President Rice Products of Thailnd and looks to be for sale in Malaysia. Make sense? Okay now on to the flavor: tom yam. Tom yam (or tom yum) is a very standard Thai variety – spicy, lemon/citrus, spicy, and usually shrimp. I was told that the creamy isn’t from dairy but from the boiling of shrimp! Let’s check it out!

Detail of the side panels (click image to enlarge). Contains shrimp.

Detail of the lid (click image to enlarge). To prepare, open lid and take out sachets and fork. Add in contents of sachets and boiling water to fill line. Steep 3 minutes, stir, and enjoy!

An included fork!

The bundle of bihun.

The soup base sachet.

Has a lemony scent – made me sneeze when I poured it into the cup!

A flavored oil sachet.

Has a spicy scent.

The solid ingredients sachet.

Shrimp and seasoning.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added shrimp, mung bean sprouts and coriander. The bihun is very standard – thin and wispy. I recommend if you have a pair of kitchen scissors cutting the noodles twice once they’re done – makes it easier to eat them. The broth is excellent – nice heat, lemongrass and shrimp components. The included shrimp hydrated nicely. A nice little cup! 3.75 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 9557128102426.

Betty Saw’s Best Noodle Recipe (from Amazon) – Betty Saw’s Best Noodle Recipes is a collection of 60 noodle recipes found in Malaysia and the region. From fresh yellow noodles and broad noodles to dried egg noodles and rice vermicelli, the recipes featured in this cookbook include elaborate dishes such as Nyonya Curry Laksa, Lor Mee and Mee Rebus, as well as light and refreshing offerings like Kerabu Beehoon, Cold Wantan Noodles with Sesame Black Vinegar Sauce and Chicken Soup Mee Sua with Poached Egg. Also included are a few regional specialties that have become all-time favourites in Malaysia such as Thai-style Fried Noodles, Cold Green Tea Soba and Burmese Coconut Noodles. With step-by-step recipes for making noodles from scratch, this recipe collection is essential for those who wish to learn the secrets to whipping up delicious and wholesome noodles at home.

A Pama TV commercial.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Lucky Me! Special Instant Pancit Bihon With Kalamansi

Rice vvermicelli isknown by many names in the world; bihun, beehoon, bihon – it’s all the same thing! One thing though – these noodles are made with corn starch! But pancit – let’s see what wikipedia has to say:

Pancit or pansit is the term for noodles in Filipino cuisine. Noodles were introduced into the Philippines by the Chinese and have since been adopted into local cuisine. The term pancit is derived from the Hokkien pian i sit (Chinese: 便ê食; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: piān-ê-si̍t or Chinese: 便食; pinyin: biàn shí) which means “something conveniently cooked fast.”[1] Different kinds of noodles can be found in Filipino supermarkets which can then be cooked at home. Noodle dishes are also standard fare in local restaurants. Food establishments specializing in noodles are often referred to as panciterias.

Nancy Reyes Lumen of the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism writes that according to food lore handed down from the Chinese, noodles should be eaten on one’s birthday.[1] They are therefore commonly served at birthday celebrations and Chinese restaurants in the Philippines often have “birthday noodles” listed on their menus. However, she warns that since “noodles represent long life and good health; they must not be cut short so as not to corrupt the symbolism.”[1]

Another one here is kalamansi. What is that? Again, wikipedia:

Citrofortunella microcarpa, the calamondin or calamansi, is a fruit tree in the family Rutaceae in native Asia. Other English language common names include calamonding, calamandarin, golden lime, Philippine lime,Panama orange, Chinese orange, and acid orange.[1] Its cultivation has spread throughout Southeast Asia, India, Hawaii, the West Indies, and Central and North America.[2] The plant is characterized by wing-like appendages on the leaf stalks and white or purplish flowers. Its fruit has either a spongy or leathery rind with a juicy pulp that is divided into sections.

The fruit is indigenous and widely cultivated in the Philippines (Tagalog: calamansi or kalamansî [kɐlɐmɐnˈsɪʔ]; Visayan: limonsito or simuyaw [sɪˈmujɐw]), Malaysia (Also known as limau kasturi) and neighboring northern parts of Indonesia. It is available year-round in the Philippines and is usually seen in its unripened green state. When left to ripen it turns a tangerine orange.

I has always thought that kalamansi was just the Filipino word for lime! Now it sounds more like a smaller kind of thing, like a lime and a kumquat combined. Interesting! Let’s check out Lucky Me! Special Bihon – with kalamansi!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Looks to be meat free, but check for yourself. To prepare, add vegetables sachet content and noodle block to a bowl and cover with boiling water. Cover for 4 minutes and drain. Add in contents of remaining sachets and stir well. Enjoy!

The bihon block.

The powder base sachet.

A light powder.

A dual sachet of seasoned oil and sauce.

The two seen here co-mingling.

The vegetables sachet.

An interesting mix – looks to be green onion and regular onion.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added pork, sweet onion, spring onion, shrimp, carrot and bell pepper sauteed with soy sauce. The noodles are thin and light. They don’t have to strong of a chewiness which I liked in this one. The flavor is kind of a light meat kind of thing with a little sweet and savory in there but no spiciness. The garnish hydrated well and added a little something something. 3.75 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 4807770272547.

I couldn’t find the Bihon variety on Amazon, but here’s the Pancit Canton Kalamansi flavor!

A short documentary by the BBC about the Philippines.