Tag Archives: shirakiku

#2569: Yamachan Yokohama Tonkotsu Shoyu

#2569: Yamachan Yokohama Tonkotsu Shoyu - Japan - The Ramen Rater

So this is the last of the three fresh varieties sent to me by Yamachan – thank you again! First off, Yamachan is pretty easily found in the United States – I’ve not only seen their products in Japanese/Asian supermarkets but at higher-end domestic grocery stores. Here’s a little from Wikipedia on Tonkotsu and Shoyu Ramen –

Shōyu (醤油, “soy sauce”) ramen is the oldest of the five, it has a clear brown broth, based on a chicken and vegetable (or sometimes fish or beef) stock with plenty of soy sauce added resulting in a soup that is tangy, salty, and savory yet still fairly light on the palate. Shōyu ramen usually has curly noodles rather than straight ones, but this is not always the case. It is often adorned with marinated bamboo shoots or menma, green onions, kamaboko(fish cakes), nori (seaweed), boiled eggs, bean sprouts or black pepper; occasionally the soup will also contain chili oil or Chinese spices, and some shops serve sliced beef instead of the usual chāshū.

Tonkotsu ramen is a ramen dish that originated in FukuokaFukuoka Prefecture on the Kyushu island of Japan, and it is a specialty dish in Fukuoka and Kyushu. It was originally prepared as an affordable fast food for laborers at fish markets. Today, it is renowned for the significant time it can take to properly prepare the dish. The soup broth is based upon pork bones and other ingredients, which is typically boiled for several hours, and the dish is traditionally served with ramen noodles that are hard in the center and topped with sliced pork belly. In Fukuoka, Japan, tonkotsu ramen is referred to as Hakata ramen.

Alrighty – let’s check out this third and final new variety from Yamachan!

Yamachan Yokohama Tonkotsu Shoyu – United States

#2569: Yamachan Yokohama Tonkotsu Shoyu - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains pork and chicken. To prepare, boil noodles in 800ml water for 3 minutes and drain. While boiling, combine sachet with 300ml boiling water and stir in. Finally, add noodles to a bowl and pour broth over them – slurp and enjoy!

#2569: Yamachan Yokohama Tonkotsu Shoyu - Japan - The Ramen Rater

The noodles – two servings in this pack.

#2569: Yamachan Yokohama Tonkotsu Shoyu - Japan - The Ramen Rater

The soup base.

#2569: Yamachan Yokohama Tonkotsu Shoyu - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Definitely looks like a mashup of shoyu and tonkotsu.

#2569: Yamachan Yokohama Tonkotsu Shoyu - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, egg, spring onion and chashu pork. The noodles are thicker than the other varieties it seems and very good. They have a nice gauge and chewiness to them. The broth is salty with a strong tonkotsu flavor. It’s complemented by the shoyu taste as well – and very rich. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 767921011316.

Yokohama Yankee: My Family’s Five Generations as Outsiders in Japan

A short video about Yokohama, Japan

#2557: Yamachan Sapporo Miso Ramen

#2557: Yamachan Sapporo Miso Ramen - United States - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - shirakiku

I contacted Yamachan a couple of weeks ago and they had new varieties for me to review! I did a Meet The Manufacturer with them a long time ago and their stuff is really great. Let’s see what Wikipedia has to say about miso –

Miso ramen is a relative newcomer, having reached national prominence around 1965. This uniquely Japanese ramen, which was developed in Hokkaido, features a broth that combines copious amounts of miso and is blended with oily chicken or fish broth – and sometimes with tonkotsu or lard – to create a thick, nutty, slightly sweet and very hearty soup. Miso ramen broth tends to have a robust, tangy flavor, so it stands up to a variety of flavorful toppings: spicy bean paste or tōbanjan (豆瓣醤), butter and corn, leeks, onions, bean sprouts, ground pork, cabbage, sesame seeds, white pepper, and chopped garlic are common. The noodles are typically thick, curly, and slightly chewy.

So let’s give this new variety from Yamachan a try!

Yamachan Sapporo Miso Ramen – United States

#2557: Yamachan Sapporo Miso Ramen - United States - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - shirakiku

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge) Contains pork and chicken. To prepare, add one of the noodle packs to 800ml boiling water and cook for 2 minutes. In a separate pot, add base to 300ml boiling water. Drain noodles and add to a bowl. Pour on soup and enjoy!

#2557: Yamachan Sapporo Miso Ramen - United States - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - shirakiku

One of the noodle packs.

#2557: Yamachan Sapporo Miso Ramen - United States - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - shirakiku

The soup base.

#2557: Yamachan Sapporo Miso Ramen - United States - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - shirakiku

Seriously thick!

#2557: Yamachan Sapporo Miso Ramen - United States - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - shirakiku

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, chashu pork, spring onion and shichimi togarashi. The noodles are great – very premium with a good hearty chew. The broth is indeed very rich and strong but not overly salty or anything like that. This is a delicious bowl of miso ramen. 4.75 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 767921011217.

#2557: Yamachan Sapporo Miso Ramen - United States - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - shirakiku

The Book of Miso

Anthony Bourdain in Sapporo, Japan

#2412: Shirakiku Sanukiya Udon Japanese Style Noodles Shrimp Flavor

#2412: Shirakiku Sanukiya Udon Japanese Style Noodles Shrimp Flavor - United States - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Here’s one I recently received by way of a reader named Colin from Arlington, Massachusetts – thanks again! So you might find these in either a refrigerated or non-refrigerated area at a grocery store. Indeed, I’ve always found this to be a bit of an oddity; why would it be in both places? Well first off, it doesn’t require refrigeration. However, sometimes this style of noodle is called ‘fresh noodles’ and so when you couple that with a refrigerated section, it gives it a little more premium feel. Anyways, here’s a little about udon from Wikipedia:

Udon (饂飩?, usually written as うどん) is a type of thick wheat flournoodle of Japanese cuisine. Udon is often served hot as a noodle soup in its simplest form, as kake udon, in a mildly flavoured broth called kakejiru, which is made of dashi, soy sauce, and mirin. It is usually topped with thinly chopped scallions. Other common toppings include tempura, often prawn or kakiage (a type of mixed tempura fritter), or aburaage, a type of deep-fried tofu pockets seasoned with sugar, mirin, and soy sauce. A thin slice of kamaboko, a halfmoon-shaped fish cake, is often added.

The flavor of broth and topping vary from region to region. Usually, dark brown broth, made from dark soy sauce (koikuchi shōyu), is used in eastern Japan, and light brown broth, made from light soy sauce (usukuchi shōyu), is used in western Japan.

So I think we’re good here. Let’s have a look at this shrimp variety.

Shirakiku Sanukiya Udon Japanese Style Noodles Shrimp Flavor – United States

#2412: Shirakiku Sanukiya Udon Japanese Style Noodles Shrimp Flavor - United States - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains shrimp. To prepare, add noodles to 1 3/4 cups of boiling water and cook for 2 minutes. Add sachet contents at 1 minute 30 seconds. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2412: Shirakiku Sanukiya Udon Japanese Style Noodles Shrimp Flavor - United States - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The noodle pouch.

#2412: Shirakiku Sanukiya Udon Japanese Style Noodles Shrimp Flavor - United States - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The soup base sachet.

#2412: Shirakiku Sanukiya Udon Japanese Style Noodles Shrimp Flavor - United States - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

A fine powder.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added lots of big shrimp. The udon noodles are thick and chewy. They have a fresh kind of mouthfeel are of fine quality. The broth has a kind of shrimp taste; what you’d expect from a shrimp instant noodle per se. Indeed my wife enjoyed them. 3.25 out of 5.,0 stars. UPC bar code 074410410896.

#2412: Shirakiku Sanukiya Udon Japanese Style Noodles Shrimp Flavor - United States - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Sanukiya U d o n Japanese-Style Noodles by Shirakiku – Shrimp (7.05 ounce)

A recipe for making your own at home.

#2403: Goku-Uma Yakisoba Japanese Style Noodle

#2403: Goku-Uma Yakisoba Japanese Style Noodle - United States - The Ramen Rater - instant noodle

We recently took a trip to Asian Food Grocery in 130th & Aurora and found this one. My wife likes yakisoba a lot and so I like to make it for her. This one has a little interesting thing though. On the sticker, it mentioned ‘This product contains chemicals known to the state of California to cause cancer, birth defects, or other reproductive harm.’ Wait, what? So I took a look at the ingredients list and found something I’d not seen before – an ingredient called Rebaudioside A. I looked that up and wikipedia had this to say:

Rebaudioside A (sometimes shortened to “Reb A”) is a steviol glycoside that is 200 times sweeter than sugar.[2] The glycoside contains only glucose (to the exclusion of other commonly found monosaccharides) as its monosaccharide moieties. It contains four glucose molecules in total with the central glucose of the triplet connected to the main steviol structure at its hydroxyl group, and the remaining glucose at its carboxyl group forming an ester bond.

Rebiana is the trade name for high-purity rebaudioside A.[3]

Okay so it looks like this is related to stevia. I looked at Rebiana and found this:

Rebiana is the trade name for high-purity rebaudioside A,[1] a steviol glycoside that is 200 times as sweet as sugar.[2] It is the primary source of sweetness in the Truvia sweetener brand. According to the Truvia website, Rebiana is derived from stevia leaves by steeping them in water and purifying the resultant extract to obtain the rebaudioside A exclusively.[3]Cargill has filed patents that give it exclusive rights to sell Rebiana in beverages.[4]

Okay so it’s the same stuff as in Truvia, a popular sweetener that comes from stevia extract. So I’m still not seeing anything about cancer. In fact, I found this on wikipedia – “Purified rebaudioside A has been allowed since December 2008 as a food additive (sweetener), sold under various trade names, and classified as “generally recognized as safe” (“GRAS”). So am I barking up the wrong tree?

The only other thing I could think of is that there could be some katsuobushi in here. Katsuobushi is smoked and dried fish that is commonly used. From the warning (one that sounds like one you would find on a pack of cigarettes), I think this may be the case. So when it comes down to it, smoked salmon, smoked meats – they have been exposed to smoke. Smoke contains carcinogens. Carcinogens have been found to cause cancer.

I will say if this is the culprit for the label warning, that the amount of seasoning you would have to eat to equal the amount found in a drag from one cigarette would probably be gargantuan; like over 100 servings. But there it is. I don’t know either way. Could be one, could be the other, could be neither – could be an error putting that on the pack (although I’m sure the company would fix that). Anyways – warning be damned! Let’s give this Goku-Uma yakisoba a try!

Goku-Uma Yakisoba Japanese Style Noodle – United States

#2403: Goku-Uma Yakisoba Japanese Style Noodle - United States - The Ramen Rater - instant noodle

An import sticker (click to enlarge).

#2403: Goku-Uma Yakisoba Japanese Style Noodle - United States - The Ramen Rater - instant noodle

Labeling from the bottom of the outer wraps (click to enlarge). Contains egg. To prepare, add in cabbage sachet and add boiling water to fill line. Let steep for 3 minutes covered. Drain. add in liquid sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2403: Goku-Uma Yakisoba Japanese Style Noodle - United States - The Ramen Rater - instant noodle

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2403: Goku-Uma Yakisoba Japanese Style Noodle - United States - The Ramen Rater - instant noodle

The noodle block.

#2403: Goku-Uma Yakisoba Japanese Style Noodle - United States - The Ramen Rater - instant noodle

The liquid base sachet.

#2403: Goku-Uma Yakisoba Japanese Style Noodle - United States - The Ramen Rater - instant noodle

Has that Worcestershire scent standard of yakisoba sauce.

#2403: Goku-Uma Yakisoba Japanese Style Noodle - United States - The Ramen Rater - instant noodle

Guess what’s in here?

#2403: Goku-Uma Yakisoba Japanese Style Noodle - United States - The Ramen Rater - instant noodle

Yep – cabbage!

#2403: Goku-Uma Yakisoba Japanese Style Noodle - United States - The Ramen Rater - instant noodle

Mayonnaise/mustard combo garnish!

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, spring onion and chashu pork. The noodles came out well – The texture and chew are very good. The yakisoba flavor is good, however it is slightly muted. Indeed, I like yakisoba sauce flavor to be decently strong. Finally, the karashi mayo. I love this stuff and it really does a lot insofar as lubricating the noodles. Without it they would be just a sticky dry affair – glad they include it! 4.75 out of 5.0 stars.   UPC bar code 074410396367.

The Ultimate Ramen Cookbook – Over 25 Ramen Noodle Recipes: The Only Ramen Noodle Cookbook You Will Ever Need

A freaking enormous ton of yakisoba.

#2315: Goku-Uma Ramen Noodles Miso Flavor

Here’s one of a line I’ve been kind of on the fence about lately. I tried their tonkotsu and was a little disappointed and hopeful that this miso will be a different story. Shall we have a look?

Detail of the side and bottom (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add sachets and boiling water to line. Cover for 3 minutes. Stir and enjoy!

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

The noodle block.

A dry sachet.

A vegetable garnish.

A liquid sachet.

The liquid base.

Finished (click to enlarge). The noodles are so-so; they end up hydrated with a slightly off al dente kind of feel to them. Just something I don’t like; like they want to be like a single noodle. The broth wasn’t bad – not the bitter sub-miso I’ve had before – but one that’s not too strong. The vegetables did well. 3.0 out of 5.0 stars.  UPC bar code 074410396497.

The Ramen Book

A recipe for miso ramen.

#2277: Goku-Uma Ramen Noodles Soy Sauce Flavor

Some days I really need to wake up before I get started. Case in point, today I deleted the above image after I had taken pictures of what was inside of the bowl! If you didn’t, know, you cal ‘undelete’ files – lots of utilities out there that do it. So there it is. Let’s crack it open figuratively and check it out!

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains shrimp. To prepare, add in sachet contents and boiling water to fill line. Let steep for 3 minutes. Stir and enjoy!

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

The noodle block.

The soup base sachet.

A light powder.

The solid ingredients sachet.

Looks like shrimp and greenery.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, spring onion, and hard boiled egg. The noodles came out pretty well although a littler on the spongy side. The broth tasted like a shoyu but was a little off. The vegetables were a nice combo, but the menma was mushy. 2.75 out of 5.0 stars.  UPC bar code 074410396640.

The Ramen Book

A recipe for tonkotsu.

#2267: Shirakiku Karami Ramen Spicy Chili Flavor Japanese Style Noodle With Soup Base

Here’s another one sent by a reader named Colin from the east coast – thanks again! I’m giving this one not a re-review but a full new review. I tried it in the past – it was review #125. Why a new review and not a re-review? Well, I don’t see anything on the old one mentioning non-fried noodles and think that maybe this has changed. The packaging has changed, but unsure if that’s denoting a difference. The brand Shirakiku is one of Nishimoto. Basically, kind of think of Trader Joe’s – they source foreign/domestic brands and re-brand them for sale in the USA under their name. That’s the case usually with Shirakiku.  Let’s have a look!

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains fish, shellfish and crustacean. To prepare, add noodle block to 1 3/4 cups boiling water and cook for 3 minutes. Add in sachet contents. Stir and enjoy!

The non-fried noodle block.

The soup base sachet (I forgot to take the picture before I put the contents into the little cup but used a little Photoshop to reconstruct the cut top left corner).

The soup base has a seafood scent.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, spring onion, narutomaki and ito togarashi. The noodles came out alright although they seemed a little foreign to the broth; they just didn’t seem like they wanted to be friends. The broth was a kind of spicy shoyu/miso-ish WTF which just screamed of something not being correct. I don’t know what’s going on here but it’s just kind of a wrongsalaught. I think I may go ahead and try other varieties in this range in hopes of a winner though. 2.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Finished (click to enlarge). UPC bar code 074410415167.

Shirakiku Japanese Style Instant Ramen Soy Noodle Sauce, 14.63 Ounce

A mom and her son go to an Asian grocery. I really like seeing things like this.

#2262: Dream Kitchen Curry

Here’s one we found when in Renton, Washington’s Uwajimaya a while back. From what it looks like on the label, this is a private label for a big distributor here in the USA by a company in Singapore.I love curry but have been a little confused by this series. Let’s give it a looksie.

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add in sachet contents and fill to line with boiling water. Let sit covered for 3 minutes. stir and enjoy!

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

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An included fork!

The noodle block.

The soup base sachet.

Interesting – not really detecting much of a scent.

The vegetables sachet.

Looks like your standard carrot, corn and spring onion.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, spring onion, hard boiled egg and pork. The noodles hydrated well with a slight tint of sponginess. The star here is definitely the broth which was more akin to a sauce by nature. It was giving; full of nice Japanese curry taste. This is that kind of tasty almost sweet kind of curry. The vegetables hydrated decently and worked well enough. 4.5 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 854195002109.

Making Artisan Pasta: How to Make a World of Handmade Noodles, Stuffed Pasta, Dumplings, and More

Want to make a huge pot of Japanese curry?

#2256: Goku-Uma Ramen Noodles Artificially Flavored Tonkotsu

I haven’t reviewed anything by this brand in a long time – they were ubiquitous for a while then kind of disappeared, then came back with more traditional Japanese ramen flavors. Let’s check out this tonkotsu bowl!

Detail from the side and bottom of the package (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself.

Detail of the lid (detail of the lid). To prepare, add in sachet contents and add boiling water to the fill line. Let steep covered for 3 minutes. stir and enjoy!

The soup base sachet.

A very light powder.

The vegetables sachet.

Peas and corn and carrot and onion and and and…

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, my last slice of chashu pork, hard boiled egg and spring onion. The noodles hydrated pretty well and were interesting. They seemed slightly on the spongy side although a tad chewier than most – although hydrated. The broth came out nicely – creamy and milky and a medium salty taste with a kind of pork mood to it. The bit of dehydrated vegetables that came with it hydrated pretty well, although carrot seemed out of place here. 3.25 out of 5.0 stars.  UPC bar code 074410396664.

The Ramen Book

A recipe for tonkotsu.

Meet The Manufacturer: #1336: Shirakiku Fresh Chow Mein Noodles With Seasoning

I’m sure you’re gonna say it – this looks familiar. Well, it’s part of a really neat coincidence that happened recently. I reviewed this one by Takamori Kosan of Japan the other day. Well, it was actually made by Sakura Noodle in Los angeles, California for the US market under their name! This one here is also made by Sakura Noodle but under the Shirakiku name. Are they different? Yep! If you look at the ingredients and nutrition facts on eacvh, there are some subtle differences. What’s interesting is that I contacted Takamori Kosan about doing a Meet The Manufacturer with them and they seem quite receptive, so keep an eye out for it coming soon! A day or so later, I was contacted by Sakura Noodle. I looked at their website and noticed this chow mein and asked if perhaps Takamori Kosan had contacted them, but they hadn’t – neat coincidence!

Something people might find odd is that mayonnaise is often a garnish for yakisoba. It comes in a variety of forms, from regular mayo to Karashi mayo, Wasabi mayo and so on. I have a squeeze bottle of mayonnaise, but I like the little packets that have come with other varieties of chow mein / yakisoba in the past. Since I have none of those, today I walk to the grocery store deli to see if I can purchase one during my daily constitutional. Let’s have a look inside the package and then I’m off to the store.

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Contains fish. To prepare, put a little oil in a pan and saute up some vegetables. Set vegetables aside. Add a tablespoon oil, two tablespoons water and the noodle block. Pan fry for 2-3 minutes. Return the veggies and sprinkle with contents of a sachet. Stir fry until veggies are all done. Enjoy!

The fresh chow mein noodle pouch.

The seasoning sachet.

Has a nice yakisoba sauce scent.

Man – it wasn’t raining earlier… But I was triumphant in acquiring a mayonnaise packet. Decided to do my whole walk of 2.3 miles in the rain. I figure the noodles will taste that much better when I get home.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added cabbage, Busan fish cake, green onion, mayonnaise and green laver (seaweed). The noodles are nice – good chew. The flavor was quite nice – it’s yakisoba! 3.75 out of 5.0 stars.  UPC bar code 074410455033.

Here’s a short video displaying how one can make yakisoba at home.

Meet The Manufacturer: Product Samples From Sakura Noodle Inc

Walked to the apartment office today to pick up a package.

Wow – no wonder it was so heavy! That little box was chock full of udon and yakisoba! Can’t wait to dig in!

#1321: Takamori Fresh Chow Mein Noodles With Seasoning

A co-worker named Joan at my wife’s work recently went to Hawaii and went out of her way to find something I hadn’t tried yet! She looked through the Big List and lo and behold, I hadn’t tried this chow mein! Thank you very much! These are fresh noodles, usually found in the cold section. They’re also a broth free variety. You might be more familiar with them as yakisoba, a noodle dish that can be found at little teriyaki joints all over. Let’s give this a try!

The back of the package (click image to enlarge). Package contains three noodle blocks and three seasoning sachets. Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, put a little oil in a pan and saute up some vegetables. Set vegetables aside. Add a tablespoon oil, two tablespoons water and the noodle block. Pan fry for 2-3 minutes. Return the veggies and sprinkle with contents of a sachet. Stir fry until veggies are all done. Enjoy!

A fresh noodle pouch. Note that there are three of these included.

Three of these sachets as well.

Smells like yakisoba seasoning!

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added grilled chicken, sweet onion, green onion and carrot. The noodles are an almost identical gauge to spaghetti noodles. They have a decent chew to them; a little chewier than spaghetti noodles. The flavor is quite good – salty, Worcestershire and enjoyable. The oil is a little bit of a gray area in this one; adds a bit of greasiness that could go either way. Good stuff. 3.75 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 074410455033.

Here’s something I’ve not heard of before – Tokuroten.