Tag Archives: u. f. o.

#2918: Nissin U.F.O. Cheese Curry Yakisoba

#2918: Nissin U.F.O. Cheese Curry Yakisoba

Hey look at this! This came by way of Hobby Link Japan, a great site that has all sorts of amazing Japanese things including instant noodles! Thank you very much! This variety is a yakisoba with a cheese curry flavor! I tell ya, this sounds really quite good to me! Here’s a little about it from Wikipedia –

Yakisoba (焼きそば[jakiꜜsoba]), literally “fried buckwheat,” is a Japanese noodle stir-fry dish. Although soba means buckwheat, yakisoba noodles are actually made from wheat flour, and are typically flavored with a condiment similar to oyster sauce. The dish first appeared in food stalls in Japan during the early 20th century.[1]

Yakisoba is most familiarly served on a plate either as a main dish or a side dish. Another popular way to prepare and serve yakisoba in Japan is to pile the noodles into a bun sliced down the middle in the style of a hot dog, and garnish the top with mayonnaise and shreds of pickled ginger. Called yakisoba-pan (pan meaning bread) it is commonly available at local festivals or konbini (convenience stores).

Sometimes, Japanese white Udon is used as a replacement of Chinese style Soba and called Yakiudon. This variation was started in Kitakyushu or Kokura in Fukuoka Prefecture.

In Okinawa, Yakisoba is popular with Okinawans and U.S. service members stationed on the island alike. After the 1945 hostilities ended on Okinawa, the US military command supplied American food products to the malnourished residents. The preferred Okinawan version was prepared from spaghetti, spam, ketchup, any available vegetable (usually canned), and mayonnaise for frying. Mess halls and other on-base eateries often serve yakisoba. Chopped hotdogs are a popular addition to yakisoba made on Okinawa, in addition to other meats such as ham, chicken, and pork.

Alright – I’m excited to give this one a try – let’s go!

Nissin U.F.O. Cheese Curry Yakisoba – Japan

#2918: Nissin U.F.O. Cheese Curry Yakisoba

Detail of the outer wraps (click to enlarge). Contains pork, chicken, and beef. To preparem, remove sachets and add boiling water to fill line. Cover for 3 minutes. Use drain spout on lid to pour off excess water. Add in liquid sachet contents and stir. Finally, garnish with cheese powder and enjoy!

#2918: Nissin U.F.O. Cheese Curry Yakisoba

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2918: Nissin U.F.O. Cheese Curry Yakisoba

The noodle block.

#2918: Nissin U.F.O. Cheese Curry Yakisoba

Loose bits from the bowl.

#2918: Nissin U.F.O. Cheese Curry Yakisoba

A liquid base sachet.

#2918: Nissin U.F.O. Cheese Curry Yakisoba

The sauce.

#2918: Nissin U.F.O. Cheese Curry Yakisoba

A dry sachet.

#2918: Nissin U.F.O. Cheese Curry Yakisoba

The cheese  powder.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion. The noodles came out well enough – dry and light on the chew. The flavor was a nice curry – very much in the sweet curry vein. The cheese was so-so but was interesting and different. 4.25 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4902105244395.

#2918: Nissin U.F.O. Cheese Curry Yakisoba

Nissin U.F.O. C h e e s e   C u r r y  Y a k i s o b a

This is how they add cheese to Nissin products.

#2890: Nissin U.F.O. Flaming Hot Seafood Flavour

#2890: Nissin U.F.O. Flaming Hot Seafood Flavour Singapore

So this one is made in Indonesia and I got it from Nissin Singapore – thanks! The last one of these I tried was ‘Japanese Sauce’ flavor – and definitely was very Indonesian in flavor and quite amazing. Very curious about this one – let’s take a look.

Nissin U.F.O. Flaming Hot Seafood Flavour – Singapore

#2890: Nissin U.F.O. Flaming Hot Seafood Flavour Singapore

Detail of the outer wraps (click to enlarge). Contains seafood. To prepare, add boiling water to fill line and cover for 4 minutes. Use drain spout to remove water. Add sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2890: Nissin U.F.O. Flaming Hot Seafood Flavour Singapore

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2890: Nissin U.F.O. Flaming Hot Seafood Flavour Singapore

The noodle block.

#2890: Nissin U.F.O. Flaming Hot Seafood Flavour Singapore

Loose seafood from the bowl.

#2890: Nissin U.F.O. Flaming Hot Seafood Flavour Singapore

A dry base sachet.

#2890: Nissin U.F.O. Flaming Hot Seafood Flavour Singapore

A light powder.

#2890: Nissin U.F.O. Flaming Hot Seafood Flavour Singapore

The spicy oil.

#2890: Nissin U.F.O. Flaming Hot Seafood Flavour Singapore

Definitely looks spicy!

#2890: Nissin U.F.O. Flaming Hot Seafood Flavour Singapore

A garnish sachet.

#2890: Nissin U.F.O. Flaming Hot Seafood Flavour Singapore

Looks like fried onion.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added fried egg, spring onion, coriander, tofu puff and casrved squid. The noodles came out just perfect – just right for a yakisoba style stir noodle. The flavor was a sweet and spicy seafood one – a very respectable heat level on this one – might knock your socks off. The fried onion garnish was really good here. 4.75 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 8992718853738.

#2890: Nissin U.F.O. Flaming Hot Seafood Flavour Singapore

Singapore Hawker Classics Unveiled: Decoding 25 Favourite Dishes

A Nissin Foods Singapore TV spot

#2745: Nissin U.F.O. Big Wasabi-Mayo Yakisoba

#2745: Nissin U.F.O. Big Wasabi-Mayo Yakisoba

Another one I picked up at Osaka in the Yaohan Centre up in Richmond, BC. This should prove to be a boatload of yakisoba! So, what’s yakisoba? Here’s what wikipedia has to say on the matter –

Yakisoba (焼きそば[jakʲiꜜsoba]), literally “fried buckwheat,” is a Japanese noodle stir-fry dish. Although soba means buckwheat, yakisoba noodles are actually made from wheat flour, and are typically flavored with a condiment similar to oyster sauce. The dish first appeared in food stalls in Japan during the early 20th century.[1]

Yakisoba is prepared by frying ramen-style wheat noodles with bite-sized pork, vegetables (usually cabbageonions or carrots) and flavored with yakisoba sauce, salt and pepper. It can be served with a variety of garnishes, such as aonori (seaweed powder), beni shoga (shredded pickled ginger), katsuobushi (fish flakes), and mayonnaise.

I love it when people get all worked up when I put mayo on yakisoba. It’s pretty funny. Let’s begin!

Nissin U.F.O. Big Wasabi-Mayo Yakisoba – Japan

#2745: Nissin U.F.O. Big Wasabi-Mayo Yakisoba

An import/distributor sticker (click to enlarge).

#2745: Nissin U.F.O. Big Wasabi-Mayo Yakisoba

Detail of the outer wraps (click to enlarge). Probably contains meat and possibly fish. To prepare, add boiling water to fill line and cover for 3 minutes. Drain using included spout. Add yellow sachet content and stir. Finally, garnish with mayo sachet and enjoy!

#2745: Nissin U.F.O. Big Wasabi-Mayo Yakisoba

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2745: Nissin U.F.O. Big Wasabi-Mayo Yakisoba

The noodle block.

#2745: Nissin U.F.O. Big Wasabi-Mayo Yakisoba

Loose bits from the tray.

#2745: Nissin U.F.O. Big Wasabi-Mayo Yakisoba

The yakisoba sauce sachet.

#2745: Nissin U.F.O. Big Wasabi-Mayo Yakisoba

Dark stuff!

#2745: Nissin U.F.O. Big Wasabi-Mayo Yakisoba

The mayo sachet – I’ll let you see the contents when it’s on the final pic.

Finished (click to enlarge). Holy mother of God…  Added Salad Cosmo organic mung bean sprouts. Okay, just so there are no misconceptions – this is a freaking huge amount of yakisoba. I honestly think changing this product’s name from Big to Freaking Huge would do the trick. The noodles came out perfectly – great gauge and chew – not at all spongy. The yakisoba sauce coated everything and without the mayo, this was really good. Bits of cabbage lent a nice crunchiness throughout. The addition of the wasabi mayonnaise added another layer of goodness – nasally spicy wasabi and mayo gave everything a more greasy effect which was very nice. Too bad I already had lunch earlier! 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4902105244135.

#2745: Nissin U.F.O. Big Wasabi-Mayo Yakisoba

Nissin Y a k i s o b a  U.F.O. Big 168g ~ 12 pieces

A TV spot for Nissin UFO

#2771: Nissin U.F.O. Fried Ramen Japanese Sauce Flavour

#2771: Nissin U.F.O. Fried Ramen Japanese Sauce Flavour

Here’s a pretty well known variety from Japan but actually made in Indonesia for Singapore and Malaysia. This one was sent to me by Nissin Singapore (thank you!) and has some big differences when you compare to it’s Japanese cousin – spicy mayonnaise to start with. Let’s unwrap this yakisoba and have a look inside U.F.O.!

Nissin U.F.O. Japanese Sauce Flavour – Singapore

#2771: Nissin U.F.O. Fried Ramen Japanese Sauce Flavour

Detail of the sides and bottom panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, take out all sachets and add boiling water to line. Cover for 4 minutes. Drain using turbo drain system. Add in oil and powder sachet contents and mix well. Finally, garnish with spicy mayo and kriuk and enjoy!

#2771: Nissin U.F.O. Fried Ramen Japanese Sauce Flavour

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2771: Nissin U.F.O. Fried Ramen Japanese Sauce Flavour

The noodle block.

#2771: Nissin U.F.O. Fried Ramen Japanese Sauce Flavour

Loose broken noodle and garnish from the tray.

#2771: Nissin U.F.O. Fried Ramen Japanese Sauce Flavour

The dry base sachet.

#2771: Nissin U.F.O. Fried Ramen Japanese Sauce Flavour

Dry seasoning.

#2771: Nissin U.F.O. Fried Ramen Japanese Sauce Flavour

The seasoned oil sachet.

#2771: Nissin U.F.O. Fried Ramen Japanese Sauce Flavour

Has a kind of marbled appearance.

#2771: Nissin U.F.O. Fried Ramen Japanese Sauce Flavour

The kriuk sachet.

#2771: Nissin U.F.O. Fried Ramen Japanese Sauce Flavour

Kriuk translates to ‘crunchy’ and these are bits of crunchy onion and garlic with some spiciness.

#2771: Nissin U.F.O. Fried Ramen Japanese Sauce Flavour

A sachet of spicy mayonnaise garnish.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added coriander, hard boiled egg, fishball and Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts. The noodles came out very well – nice gauge and chew. The flavor was a sweet and tasty one – definitely a fusion of yakisoba sauce and Southeast Asian influences. The mayo was a nice spicy one and the crunchy bits were very good – spicy too! An excellent yakisoba. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 8992718853561.

#2771: Nissin U.F.O. Fried Ramen Japanese Sauce Flavour

Nissin Instant Sosu Pan-fried Noodles, Large Size, 5.9oz(168g) X 3 Tubs (For 3 Servings) [Japan Import]

A Nissin TV spot

#1207: Nissin U.F.O. (Unidentified Flying Object) Yakisoba With Wasabi Mayonnaise

Yakisoba is great but add some mayo with wasabi? Man that sounds really good! Let’s have a look at this one!

Here are the details from the side and bottom (click image to enlarge).

Here’s the lid of the bowl (click image to enlarge). Note the drain spout on the upper part.

The noodle block.

The liquid ingredient sachet.

Has a nice yakisoba sauce scent.

What have we here?

Has a kind of salty meat and seaweed taste to it.

Here’s the wasabi mayonnaise sachet. You open a corner and squirt!

The veggies from the bottom of the bowl. Looks like cabbage and other bits in there.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added sauteed beef and sweet onion and green onion. The noodles are plentiful and have a nice texture – they’re rounded and kind of fluffy. The flavor is very nice; you start with a standard Worcestershire yakisoba taste. The wasabi mayonnaise has a good ‘zing’ to it. Of course, this is a very greasy dish, but that’s the point. The little sprinkles added a very nice seaweed/saltiness. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 4902105224076.

Japanese commercials where UFO’s are involved from 1979-1999 – this is pretty great stuff!

#738: Nissin U.F.O. (Unidentified Flying Object) Yakisoba

This one is a donation from Courtnay N. of Surrey, BC! She brought some back from a trip to Japan! Thanks! So this looks really interesting – let’s give it a try!

Here’s the bottom of the package (click image to enlarge).

This is what you see once you remove the plastic wrapping (click image to enlarge).

The noodle block – a nice, big, round disc!

Kind of looks like this piece I did a long time ago!

Under the noodle block, some veggies and – yes – dried meat!

Here’s the liquid seasoning pack.

The liquid seems to be yakisoba sauce and oil.

This looks like…

Seaweed to put on top! Sweet!

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added a little of the veggie mix we made, a little beef lunch meat, a little kizami shoga (pickled ginger) and a pinch of Ajishima Kimchi furikake. The noodles are a bit mushy; a bummer. I expected them to be a little higher quality. The yakisoba sauce mixture has a wonderful taste – I like how it is liquid instead of a powdered addition. The veggies are nice and the meat re hydrated nicely! The powdered seaweed adds a nice extra taste to everything. Wish the noodles were a little better, but the flavors are really good – 3.75 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 4902105022122 .

Yakisoban, to the rescue!

Yep – there’s a Super Nintendo game!

Okay so I’ve shown KPop and VPop, but here’s some Bubblegum JPop – Kyary Pamyu Pamyu. What I’ve noticed is that all three of these regional pop forms maintain intrusively catchy melodies that will eat your mind and spit it out on the sidewalk. My wife and I have listened to this album about a thousand times in the car already – she knows all the words and we have both developed sore necks and minds from the tunes.