Tag Archives: mixed

#2963: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Young Vinegar

#2963: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Young Vinegar

Recently, I had the chance to try Kiki’s aged variety and liked it quite a bit. I really don’t know much about vinegar to be honest. Here’s a little about it from Wikipedia –

Vinegar is a liquid consisting of about 5–20% acetic acid (CH3COOH), water (H2O), and trace chemicals that may include flavorings. Acetic acid is produced by the fermentation of ethanol by acetic acid bacteria.[1] It is now mainly used as a cooking ingredient, or in pickling.

As the most easily manufactured mild acid, it has historically had a wide variety of industrial, medical, and domestic uses. Some of these are still commonly practiced, such as its use as a household cleaner.

Chinese black vinegar is an aged product made from rice, wheat, milletsorghum, or a combination thereof. It has an inky black color and a complex, malty flavor. There is no fixed recipe, so some Chinese black vinegars may contain added sugar, spices, or caramel color. The most popular variety, Zhenjiang vinegar, originates in the city of Zhenjiang in Jiangsu Province, eastern China.[17] Shanxi mature vinegar is another popular type that is made exclusively from sorghum and other grains. Nowadays in Shanxi province, there are still some traditional workshops producing handmade varieties which are aged for at least five years with a high acidity. Only the varieties made in Taiyuan and some counties in Jinzhong and aged for at least three years is considered authentic Shanxi mature vinegar according to the latest national standard. A somewhat lighter form of black vinegar, made from rice, is produced in Japan, where it is called kurozu.

Okay, so that’s a lot of info about vinegar. When I was in Taiwan in November 2017, I saw a booth at a food expo with different vinegars and people sipping on it. As it turns out, there’s such a thing as drinking vinegar too – one just made to drink! Fascinating. Well, let’s check out this unique variety from Taiwan!

Kiki Noodles Mixed With Young Vinegar – Taiwan

#2963: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Young Vinegar

A distributor’s/import label (click to enlarge). This one is for Hong Kong.

#2963: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Young Vinegar

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add noodles to a pot of boiling water and cook for 3~5 minutes. Drain. Add in sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2963: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Young Vinegar

One of the five packs inside.

#2963: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Young Vinegar

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge).

#2963: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Young Vinegar

The noodle block.

#2963: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Young Vinegar

The first of two liquid sachets.

#2963: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Young Vinegar

Oil and soy I’m guessing.

#2963: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Young Vinegar

The second sachet.

#2963: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Young Vinegar

The young stuff.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added scallions, sliced chashu pork and nanami togarashi. The noodle is just great – love this style of noodle. Great chew and mouthfeel. Gauge is on point too. They work well with the flavoring – young vinegar definitely isn’t as pungent or strong – and it works well here. A nice flavor all around with a touch of heat and a little ginger back. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 4713302680035.

#2963: Kiki Noodles Mixed With Young Vinegar

Rilakkuma Pottery Ramen Noodles Bowl W/ Spoon

Okay so what you’re seeing here is noodles that have just come off a conveyor belt being folded and set on a tray that will go either into a big facility with fans that dry them or out into a sunny day that dries them. I went to a factory two years ago that did the latter and I tried to fold these noodles and I’ll tell you one thing – it’s not as easy as it looks. This shot is very slow – people who do this for a living literally fold these at a million miles an hour – super fast motion that they could probably do with their eyes closed.

#710: Saigon Ve Wong Kung-Fu Instant Noodles Mixed Foods Flavor

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Been saving this one for just the right day – and here it is! Mixed foods flavor?! Wow this is a fascinating one – never have I found an instant noodle with such a non-descript totle! Surf and turf? Not sure what’s going on here but we’ll give ‘er a try!

To be honest, if you read the ingredients it looks like it’s kind of a seafood bowl (click image to enlarge).

The noodle block.

Powder seasoning.

Very fine powder.

Veggie and dehydrated seafood packet.

Dehydrated naruto and a couple little shrimp in there.

Seasoned oil packet.

Reminds me of an ocean on a sunny day with some seagulls. Yeah I know…

Finished (click image to enlarge). Made a two egg omelet with a little Kikkoman soy sauce and some Melinda’s Garlic Habanero hot sauce. Also added some store brand stir fry veggies and Ajishima Kim Chi furikake on top of those. The noodles are lackluster – kind of stringy and not super happy. The broth is interesting; kind of sweet seafoody like crab. I would say it’s kind of a mixed seafood flavor. The veggies aren’t bad; the shrimp and naruto were kind of passable. I think the title was really what drew me to this one and I’m not surprised with the quality. 2.75 out of 5.0 stars. UPC barcode 8934684025511 .

Foods from all over the world event in Sweden – looks amazing!

Here’s how to make Vietnamese Mixed Foods Soup!

#686: Wingsfood Mi Sedaap Mi Goreng Perisa Sambal Goreng

More Indonesian noodles! This one’s a spicy pack of mi goreng – fried noodles!

This is the export label.

Here’s the package back (click image to enlarge) – the export sticker was a little obstinate.

Here’s the noodle block.

Well, not too hard to tell what we have here – from left to right, seasoned oil, hot chili sauce and sweet soy sauce.

Powdered seasoning sachet!

So everything gets put in the bowl and the noodles once done are drained and everything is stirred up.

Here’s the garnish packet – fried onions!

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added two fried eggs, some roast turkey lunch meat, kizami shoga (pickled ginger), Jane’s Krazy Mixed Up Salt and Melinda’s Garlic Habanero hot sauce. Oh – and the fried onion garnish. The noodles are great – chewy and soft too. The flavor is spicy and sweet – along with a satisfying and delicious crunch from the fried onion. This is grubbin! 4.5 out of 5.0 stars! UPC barcode 8998866200448 – get it here.

Mi Sedaap commercial.

Carl Sagan again in this awesome series.

#650: Dragonfly Instant Noodles Artificial Chicken Flavor

The last time I had Dragonfly brand noodles they were in a bowl and cooked by steeping. This time around it’s boiling in a pot. I remember how much I really enjoyed these Chinese noodles! Let’s see how they are in a pack.

Here’s the back of the packaging (click image to enlarge).

Here’s the noodle block in all of its tasty glory. I remember these wre like a very light pasta and really were quite nice.

Three packets – clockwise from the top we have the veggies, the seasoned oil and the dry powder seasoning.

As you can see, there’s a good amount of veggies. I remember that these bulked up quite a bit and tasted very fresh.

Click image to enlarge. This is gonna be good! I tried the noodles and broth pre-additions by the way. I added two fried eggs with a little Jane’s Krazy Mixed Up Salt and fried shallots, some oven roasted turkey lunch meat, some kizami shoga (pickled ginger) and a little zip of Huy Fong Sriracha (red rooster) sauce.

The noodles were even better this time; they were luxuriant and had a nice color to them. They weren’t tough but they weren’t too soft either. They were about as spot on for an instant noodle as I’ve had. The broth was very tasty – full of chicken taste. The veggies were prevalent, abundant and everywhere with a good crunch (especially when it came to the slivers of carrot). A fine bowl of noodles and with everything I added a meal fit for a king! I like this stuff a lot – I’ll be reviewing the Onion Flavor soon and I’m sure that’s going to be quite amazing in pack form too – 4.0 out of 5.0 stars – worth getting especially when so cheap! UPC barcode 721557450918 – I think this is it here.

Post meal techno chicken.

Welcome to limbo.

#630: Ve Wong Kung-Fu Artificial Mushroom Pork Flavor Instant Oriental Noodle Soup

Here’s one that has been in the noodle bin since the trip to California my wife and son and I took in July! Time to eat. Mushroom pork just didn’t sound too good, but you know me, I have to try it.

I scanned the label for those so interested. Click image to enlarge.

Unexpected this is. Usually these are a bit less interesting. That big packet on top was absolutely full of powdered seasoning. Lower right is veggies and lower left was seasoned oil and maybe soy sauce – not sure.

See what I mean about the powder seasoning? Huge amount!

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added one fried egg with a little Krazy Mixed Up Salt on top. I gave it a try and must say it hit the mark as I expected. The noodles were okay – nothing amazing but not bad. The broth was slightly thick and almost slithery. It definitely had mushroom flavor going on as well as a funky pork fat taste. The veggies. The mushrooms were slimy and gross. Again, I’m not a big mushroom fan, but this really put me off. 1.25 out of 5.0 stars – at least my egg was good, but that didn’t add points to the score. UPC bar code is 4710008212638.

Something is going on in Korea.

But I don’t think Koreans are burping the Super Mario Brothers theme.

#622: Daikoku My Friend Vic Tanuki Udon Big Bowl

You might be viewing this website today because of the article they did about me in The Everett Herald – or not! Either way, I thought I’d break out something I found last week that I’m really stoked on. This is a bowl I got at Uwajimaya, a Japanese grocery in Seattle (there’s one in Bellevue, too).

If you’re new to noodles, let’s start with the name here. Tanuki? Well, you’re going to find this really bizarre – just have a look at this. I’ve noticed that when tanuki is mentioned, there’s going to be some tempura involved. Udon? It’s a thick, wider gauge noodle.  My Friend Vic? You got me – maybe y ou know him?

Click image to enlarge. When stuff like this ends up in stores here in the United States, they have to conform to our requirements as far as the nutrition facts labels and ingredients lists. What can be tough is deciphering the actual name of the instant noodle bowl (I don’t speak Japanese). Google to the rescue! If you take all the digits on the barcode from the label and enter it into Google, you’ll end up with a ton of links to Japanese online groceries – click Translate on the result and after clicking on a few of them, you can get the idea of what the noodles are titled.

Two packets here – powdered on the left and the tempura on the right. Nice to see there’s some seaweed included!

I like my tempura crunchy, so I leave it to the side for now. Here’s the noodles and powdered seasoning awaiting the water. Just like you’d expect, you fill it up to the line and cover it. I use an old yearbook – not mine – from 1987 I found at the Goodwill Outlet in Seattle.

Holy cow this looks awesome (click image to enlarge)! I added a fried egg and put a little Krazy Mixed Up Salt on top. I also added a little bit of Kizami Shoga, which is pickled ginger – not the kind you find with sushi that’s sweet but the sharp flavored kind. Let’s start with the noodles. They came out really nicely – they’re broad and thick – very tasty! Not very chewy, but not spongy. The broth is very tasty – salty, yes, but not ‘table salty.’ The good shoyu (soy sauce) flavor comes through. Then the tempura: crunchy and tasty – the seaweed is nice too! I really enjoyed this one a lot – Highly recommended! 4.75 out of 5.0 stars!

Here’s a vid of someone making what you’d find if you ordered tanuki udon in a Japanese restaurant.

Earlier this year, I was invited down to KIRO News/Radio 97.3FM and was interviewed by Rachel Belle!

#604: Batchelors Super Noodles Low Fat Chicken & Herb Flavour

This one came from Cindy C. of England! Thanks Cindy- if you have a picture of where you’ve stuck your stickers, send it along, please! This is the first of the low fat Super Noodles I’ll be trying – I think there’s one or two more.

That looks like a bit lower fat content than others. I think there are steamed – not fried noodles (click image to enlarge).

Here’s the block.

No cool little recipe here – kind of bummed about that.

The powder.  Fleck or two of some kind of miniscule vegetable.

Done (click image to enlarge). Added two scrambled eggs with Krazy Mixed Up Salt, some fried shallot and some Tabasco Buffalo Style Hot Sauce. The noodles aren’t bad; the lack of flavor however was. These noodles were just plain bland. Filling, yet bland. 2.0 out of 5.0 stars – disappointing. You can find this and other Batchelor Super Noodles (including the massively awesome BACON!!!) here. EAN bar code 5000175410685.

Super Noodles advertisement

Re-Review: Indomie Mi Goreng Fried Noodles

Yep – another re-review! But this one’s very special – i haven’t had this in a few years and I hope after reading and seeing, this stuff you’ll be ready and even dying to try it. This, my friend, is one of the finest instant noodle varieties I’ve ever had. Thanks to Jim C. for contacting Empire International, distributor of these and sending samples!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). These noodles are drained and then you stir the seasonings in.  Also, notice Empire International’s info in the lower left.

Here are the noodles before cooking. Good stuff!

On the left is dry seasoning, on the right, chili powder. Notice the little guy by the pepper? Who is that guy? I wonder if he has a name. When they introduced ZIP codes, the US Postal Service had a little guy they invented named ‘Mr. ZIP.’ Looks kind of like him.

On the left, we have seasoned oil which contains oil and onion. On the right kecap manis, which is a sweet soy sauce – this really contributes to the flavor.

Clockwise from top left, chili powder, powder seasoning, kecap manis and finally seasoned oil.

Click image to enlarge. Finished product! I add two fried eggs, a little pickled ginger (kizami shoga), some fried shallot and a couple shakes of Krazy Mixed Up Salt on the eggs. Wow – this stuff is so tasty. It’ a little sweet, a little spicy and very tasty. I love it – can’t get enough of it and give it 5.0 out of 5.0 stars – this is one of the wonders of the instant noodle world! Awesome! Get it here!

Okay this is really strange – never heard of this guy before.

No shit?

Rad vid!

#347: Sunny Maid Mi Chay Vegetarian Ramen

So this has been one I’ve been curious about for a while. It’s lurked in my ramen box, quietly asking me to try it from time to time. I heeded its call, and tonight gave it the trappings of a fine bowl of noodles.

The shiny packet contained vegetables and seasoning powder. After adding the spices, I tend to give the inside of the powder packet a quick lick to get a taste. Well, I wasn’t too enthused. This was nasty. Like socks.

Vegetables on the left and seasoning oil on the right. You can see the powder intermingled with the veggies.

Click image to enlarge. So on this one I added two fried eggs, a small baked chicken breast, Huy Fong Sriracha hot sauce, kizami shoga pickled ginger and fried shallots. A pinch of ‘Krazy Mixed Up Salt‘ atop the eggs.

SoI sampled the noodles and broth before the additions. It wasn’t my favorite whatsoever. The noodles were fine but the flavors were horrible. Almost a hint of dirt I would say. Just not my style whatsoever… 1.75 out of 5.0 stars. Get it here.

So here’s a guy making ramen and then adding vegetables.

STAR TREK FARTS RULE!!!