Tag Archives: mayonnaise

#2801: Myojo Ippei-Chan Yomise-No Yakisoba Barbeque Sauce Flavor With Mayonnaise

#2801: Myojo Ippei-Chan Yomise-No Yakisoba Barbeque Sauce Flavor With Mayonnaise

Hey look at this! This came by way of Hobby Link Japan, a great site that has all sorts of amazing Japanese things including instant noodles! Thank you very much! This variety is a yakisoba with barbeque sauce and mayonnaise! I tell ya, this sounds really quite good to me! Here’s a little about it from Wikipedia –

Yakisoba (焼きそば[jakiꜜsoba]), literally “fried buckwheat,” is a Japanese noodle stir-fry dish. Although soba means buckwheat, yakisoba noodles are actually made from wheat flour, and are typically flavored with a condiment similar to oyster sauce. The dish first appeared in food stalls in Japan during the early 20th century.[1]

Yakisoba is most familiarly served on a plate either as a main dish or a side dish. Another popular way to prepare and serve yakisoba in Japan is to pile the noodles into a bun sliced down the middle in the style of a hot dog, and garnish the top with mayonnaise and shreds of pickled ginger. Called yakisoba-pan (pan meaning bread) it is commonly available at local festivals or konbini (convenience stores).

Sometimes, Japanese white Udon is used as a replacement of Chinese style Soba and called Yakiudon. This variation was started in Kitakyushu or Kokura in Fukuoka Prefecture.

In Okinawa, Yakisoba is popular with Okinawans and U.S. service members stationed on the island alike. After the 1945 hostilities ended on Okinawa, the US military command supplied American food products to the malnourished residents. The preferred Okinawan version was prepared from spaghetti, spam, ketchup, any available vegetable (usually canned), and mayonnaise for frying. Mess halls and other on-base eateries often serve yakisoba. Chopped hotdogs are a popular addition to yakisoba made on Okinawa, in addition to other meats such as ham, chicken, and pork.

Alright – I’m excited to give this one a try – let’s go!

Myojo Ippei-Chan Yomise-No Yakisoba Barbeque Sauce Flavor With Mayonnaise – Japan

#2801: Myojo Ippei-Chan Yomise-No Yakisoba Barbeque Sauce Flavor With Mayonnaise

Detail of the outer wraps (click to enlarge). contains pork. To prepare, add boilign water to fill line and cover for four minutes. Use spout to drain. Add in sachet contents and combine. Finally, garnish with mayonnaise and enjoy!

#2801: Myojo Ippei-Chan Yomise-No Yakisoba Barbeque Sauce Flavor With Mayonnaise

The lid under the plastic wraps (click to enlarge).

#2801: Myojo Ippei-Chan Yomise-No Yakisoba Barbeque Sauce Flavor With Mayonnaise

The noodle block.

#2801: Myojo Ippei-Chan Yomise-No Yakisoba Barbeque Sauce Flavor With Mayonnaise

Loose bits from the tray.

#2801: Myojo Ippei-Chan Yomise-No Yakisoba Barbeque Sauce Flavor With Mayonnaise

A sauce sachet.

#2801: Myojo Ippei-Chan Yomise-No Yakisoba Barbeque Sauce Flavor With Mayonnaise

Smells like barbeque sauce.

#2801: Myojo Ippei-Chan Yomise-No Yakisoba Barbeque Sauce Flavor With Mayonnaise

A mayonnaise sachet.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion, shichimi togarashi, chashu pork and Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts. The noodles are great and there’s enough for a couple people. The flavor is a nice barbeque sauce taste. The mayonnaise gives it a good lick of greasiness which moves things about easier. Supplied garnish of cabbage and meat was spot on. The McRib of yakisoba.5.0 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4902881419192.

#2801: Myojo Ippei-Chan Yomise-No Yakisoba Barbeque Sauce Flavor With Mayonnaise

Myojo Ippeichan Yomise no Y a k i s o b a Omori Noodles BBQ Sauce

A TV commercial for this range

#2745: Nissin U.F.O. Big Wasabi-Mayo Yakisoba

#2745: Nissin U.F.O. Big Wasabi-Mayo Yakisoba

Another one I picked up at Osaka in the Yaohan Centre up in Richmond, BC. This should prove to be a boatload of yakisoba! So, what’s yakisoba? Here’s what wikipedia has to say on the matter –

Yakisoba (焼きそば[jakʲiꜜsoba]), literally “fried buckwheat,” is a Japanese noodle stir-fry dish. Although soba means buckwheat, yakisoba noodles are actually made from wheat flour, and are typically flavored with a condiment similar to oyster sauce. The dish first appeared in food stalls in Japan during the early 20th century.[1]

Yakisoba is prepared by frying ramen-style wheat noodles with bite-sized pork, vegetables (usually cabbageonions or carrots) and flavored with yakisoba sauce, salt and pepper. It can be served with a variety of garnishes, such as aonori (seaweed powder), beni shoga (shredded pickled ginger), katsuobushi (fish flakes), and mayonnaise.

I love it when people get all worked up when I put mayo on yakisoba. It’s pretty funny. Let’s begin!

Nissin U.F.O. Big Wasabi-Mayo Yakisoba – Japan

#2745: Nissin U.F.O. Big Wasabi-Mayo Yakisoba

An import/distributor sticker (click to enlarge).

#2745: Nissin U.F.O. Big Wasabi-Mayo Yakisoba

Detail of the outer wraps (click to enlarge). Probably contains meat and possibly fish. To prepare, add boiling water to fill line and cover for 3 minutes. Drain using included spout. Add yellow sachet content and stir. Finally, garnish with mayo sachet and enjoy!

#2745: Nissin U.F.O. Big Wasabi-Mayo Yakisoba

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2745: Nissin U.F.O. Big Wasabi-Mayo Yakisoba

The noodle block.

#2745: Nissin U.F.O. Big Wasabi-Mayo Yakisoba

Loose bits from the tray.

#2745: Nissin U.F.O. Big Wasabi-Mayo Yakisoba

The yakisoba sauce sachet.

#2745: Nissin U.F.O. Big Wasabi-Mayo Yakisoba

Dark stuff!

#2745: Nissin U.F.O. Big Wasabi-Mayo Yakisoba

The mayo sachet – I’ll let you see the contents when it’s on the final pic.

Finished (click to enlarge). Holy mother of God…  Added Salad Cosmo organic mung bean sprouts. Okay, just so there are no misconceptions – this is a freaking huge amount of yakisoba. I honestly think changing this product’s name from Big to Freaking Huge would do the trick. The noodles came out perfectly – great gauge and chew – not at all spongy. The yakisoba sauce coated everything and without the mayo, this was really good. Bits of cabbage lent a nice crunchiness throughout. The addition of the wasabi mayonnaise added another layer of goodness – nasally spicy wasabi and mayo gave everything a more greasy effect which was very nice. Too bad I already had lunch earlier! 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4902105244135.

#2745: Nissin U.F.O. Big Wasabi-Mayo Yakisoba

Nissin Y a k i s o b a  U.F.O. Big 168g ~ 12 pieces

A TV spot for Nissin UFO

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Alright – bring on the confusion, the shock and the WTF’s. Yes, mayonnaise is very popular as a topping in Japan. Why? Well, it’s freaking awesome – it’s tasty and works very well. Yakisoba without it is just not as good.

Speaking of mayonnaise, I once had the chance to partake in a contest with a friend many years ago. Two jars of mayonnaise, I believe 12 ounce, were purchased. The challenge was to see who could eat more in 10 minutes. I was on no problem; I had the title of Mayonnaise King for a long time. But he wanted to challenge me so I figured why the hell not. This was at a party and people were actually betting on who would win. The timer started and the eating began.

Mayonnaise is thick and oily stuff. The first big bite was no problem, however, the second was. Once the first goes down, the next wants to stick to it so it is a very slow process. I did win, but by a slim margin. I think where I won though was as this was a party we were having some beers and I chose a Coors – very bubbly. This broke down the funk I had in my mouth from the mayo and I was back in action quickly. My opponent, however, sat on a couch, whining and moaning for much of the evening.

Here’s a little from Wikipedia about Japanese mayonnaise –

Japanese mayonnaise is typically made with apple cider vinegar or rice vinegar and a small amount of MSG, which gives it a different flavor from mayonnaise made from distilled vinegar.[39][page needed][40] It is most often sold in soft plastic squeeze bottles. Its texture is thicker than most Western commercial mayonnaise in part because only egg yolks and not the entire egg is used when making it.[41]

Apart from salads, it is popular with dishes such as okonomiyakitakoyaki and yakisoba and may also accompany katsu and karaage.[42]

Kewpie (Q.P.) is the most popular brand of Japanese mayonnaise,[43] advertised with a Kewpie doll logo. The vinegar is a proprietary blend containing apple and malt vinegars.[44] The Kewpie company was started in 1925 by Tochiro Nakashima, his goal was to create a condiment that made eating vegetables more enjoyable.[45]

So yeah – mayonnaise is great in yakisoba. I will say right here that I absolutely despise and wretch at the thought of Miracle Whip, so don’t even consider using it on yakisona. Let’s check this one out.

Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise – Japan

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The distribution sticker (click to enlarge). I wish they were better with the names of these products on these labels…

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Here’s detail of the outer wraps (click to enlarge). Unsure whether or not it contains meat. To prepare, open tab 1 to line 2. Take out sachets. Add in boiling water to line and close for 3~4 minutes. Open tab 3 and use to drain. Remove lid. add in powder sachet and combine. Finally, add mayonnaise sachet contents and enjoy!

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The noodle block.

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Loose garnish from inside the tray.

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

A powder sachet.

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The flavoring base.

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The mayonnaise sachet!

Finished (click to enlarge). The noodles are on the dry side although they pull in the yakisoba powder nicely. The powder coats everything and has a very authentic taste to it. The included garnish is great – I especially love the crunchy cabbage. Finally, the mayonnaise has a little kick to it and just brings it all home. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4902105226797.

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Nissin UFO, Instant Japanese Sosu Yakisoba(Pan-fried Noodles), 4.5oz(129g) x 6pcs (For 6 servings)[Japan Import] (get it here)

A great TV spot for Nissin’s U.F.O.

#2668: Samyang Foods Wasa-Mayo Ramen

#2668: Samyang Foods Wasa-Mayo Ramen

I’ve had this for a little while – just sitting and waiting for me to give it a try. With the prodding of my readers, today is the day. People seem to be really interested in this one! Here’s what Samyang Foods had to say about it –

This is a stir-fried noodle with original mayonnaise and soybean sauce.
It features a friendly and cute package with a new character.
You can taste a harmonious flavor of Wasabi and Mayonnaise.
It’s a new concept of stir-fried noodle with three different sauces.
Enjoy our premium stir-fried noodles!

Alright – let’s get to it!

Samyang Foods Wasa-Mayo Ramen – South Korea

#2668: Samyang Foods Wasa-Mayo Ramen

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains egg. To prepare, add boiling water to line and cover for 4 minutes. Drain using poke-thru spout system in lid. Add in sachet contents. Stir and enjoy!

#2668: Samyang Foods Wasa-Mayo Ramen

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2668: Samyang Foods Wasa-Mayo Ramen

The noodle block.

#2668: Samyang Foods Wasa-Mayo Ramen

Loose bits from the bottom of the bowl.

#2668: Samyang Foods Wasa-Mayo Ramen

A liquid sachet.

#2668: Samyang Foods Wasa-Mayo Ramen

Thick and dark.

#2668: Samyang Foods Wasa-Mayo Ramen

A dual sachet.

#2668: Samyang Foods Wasa-Mayo Ramen

Wasabi on the left, mayo on the right.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts and spring onion. The noodles came out pretty well although slightly spongy. The flavor was pretty good – the soy flavor sauce had a nice sweetness to it. The mayonnaise and wasabi was a nice mixture but seemed to be missing something I can’t put my finger on. 3.25 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 8801073211261.

#2668: Samyang Foods Wasa-Mayo Ramen

Samyang Real WasaMayo Stir Noodle / newly launched / wasabi mayo / wasabi mayo stir noodle

really like this one

The Ramen Rater’s 6th Annual Momofuku Ando Day

The Ramen Rater's Sixth Annual Momofuku Ando Day

Every year, I celebrate the life and innovative achievements of Momofuku Ando, the inventor of the instant noodle. This year, I thought it’d be neat to show different varieties of Cup Noodles, a global brand that celebrated its 45th anniversary last year.

Cup Noodle (or Cup Noodles) were realized while Mr. Ando was travelling. He noticed businessmen adding chunks of instant noodles to their coffee cups, filled with boiling water. This concept reaches a new level by creating noodle blocks that go into the cup and are elevated slightly. Boiling water is introduced and the space above and below the block allow the boiling water to reach all surfaces of the noodle, making them prepare evenly.

In this video, I take a look at six different Cup Noodles varieties from around the world as well as a recipe for yakisoba using Nissin Yakisoba from Japan.

Nissin Yakisoba – Japan

Nissin Yakisoba with Chashu Pork + Mayonnaise

Finished (click to enlarge). So I made the yakisoba using the standard instruction. Second, I also added some chashu pork and karashi mayonnaise.

To get the mayo to look like this here’s what I do. I take a sandwich baggie and add mayonnaise to one end. On the other, poke three holes in the corner. Squeeze the mayo at one end over to the other. I usually give it a squeeze over the sink to make sure which side it will squirt out of. This saves an epic mess. Finally, I just go back and forth over the noodles and chashu and end up with this effect. Actually, its kind of like a piping gun – this way you can just chuck the baggie in the trash. Specifically its very convenient. Also, if you have any yakisoba that comes with a sachet of mayo, you could poke a push pin in the end.

Happy Momofuku Ando Day to everyone! A great day to thank the man who brought one of our favorite foods into the world!

#1890: Kuriki Beef Tongue Shio Mayo Ramen

Okay so you might be wondering – beef tongue shio mayo ramen – that couldn’t possibly mean… Yes. Where did I get it though?

This is Shinichi. In the intro to the Bottom Ten List video, he was kind enough to do the narration. I thought he resided in Osaka, Japan, but he’s currently in the Seattle area going to college! We decided we should meet up at The Ramen Rater WHQ and talk about noodles. He’s working with Mr., Yamato of Yakantei in an attempt to educate people about instant noodles from very localized regions of Japan – I’ll let you know a lot more about it soon. He brought me some really different varieties of instant noodles over, one of them was this one.  To answer the question, yes – it’s mayonnaise flavor! Let’s check this one out!

The back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains fish. to prepare, boil 550ml water and cook noodle block for 3 minutes. Add in sachet contents and stir – cook another 1.5 minutes. Stir and enjoy!

The noodle block.

The first of two sachets.

Has an interesting scent – going to guess that this is the beef tongue flavor.

The second sachet.

Wow – it smells like mayonnaise – very strange!

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion, kizami shoga (pickled ginger), hard boiled egg and barbecue pork. The noodles have a nice gauge and tooth to them – like a light upgrade to your standard instant noodles. But that’s where the term ‘standard’ ends it applicability. The broth has a strong mayonnaise flavor with a kind of beefiness which is very ‘organ like’ – guessing it is ‘tongue-like.’ It’s a little weird eating something that’s supposed to taste like a tongue of a cow, but honestly, it’s quite good. The broth has a nice flavor and isn’t super thin, either. 4.5 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 4543185002002.

If you’re in the mood for something Japanese and want to try it with mayo style, look no further! Kewpie Mayonnaise (Japanese Mayo) – 500g Net 17.64 FL. OZ.

Eating beef tongue in Japan.

#1831: Kuriki Plum Mayo Ramen

Okay so you might be wondering – plum mayo ramen – that couldn’t possibly mean… Yes – plum and mayonnaise flavor. Where did I get it?

This is Shinichi. In the intro to the Bottom Ten List video, he was kind enough to do the narration. I thought he resided in Osaka, Japan, but he’s currently in the Seattle area going to college! We decided we should meet up at The Ramen Rater WHQ and talk about noodles. He’s working with Mr., Yamato of Yakantei in an attempt to educate people about instant noodles from very localized regions of Japan – and they have a special subscription box to check out. He brought me some really different varieties of instant noodles over, one of them was this one.  To answer the question, yes – it’s mayonnaise flavor! Let’s check this one out!

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains fish. to prepare, boil 550ml water and cook noodle block for 3 minutes. Add in sachet contents and stir – cook another 1.5 minutes. Stir and enjoy!

The noodle block.

The first of two powder sachets.

Has a definite plum scent – something I’ve never found when sniffing instant noodle seasonings!

The second seasoning sachet.

This one does indeed smell like mayonnaise!

Finished. Added spring onion. The noodles are perfect instant noodles – gauge and chew are as standard and right as the sky is blue. The broth is something that will make anyone stop for a second and then emit a resounding ‘hmm.’ It’s definitely got a plum scent as well as a mayonnaise scent. I would never think of dipping a plum in mayonnaise, but perhaps people in Japan have and maybe some even do. Well, it works – there’s a nice balance of flavor and little bits of plum and a hint of spiciness.  My wife said it tasted like Christmas! This works though – worth trying if you can find it. 4.0 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4543185002170.

If you’re in the mood for something Japanese and want to try it with mayo style, look no further! Kewpie Mayonnaise (Japanese Mayo) – 500g Net 17.64 FL. OZ.

This guys really likes mayonnaise!

#1752: Kuriki Mayo Ramen

Okay so you might be wondering – mayo ramen – that couldn’t possibly mean… Yes. Where did I get it though?

This is Shinichi. In the intro to the Bottom Ten List video, he was kind enough to do the narration. I thought he resided in Osaka, Japan, but he’s currently in the Seattle area going to college! We decided we should meet up at The Ramen Rater WHQ and talk about noodles. He’s working with Mr., Yamato of Yakantei in an attempt to educate people about instant noodles from very localized regions of Japan – I’ll let you know a lot more about it soon. He brought me some really different varieties of instant noodles over, one of them was this one.  To answer the question, yes – it’s mayonnaise flavor! Let’s check this one out!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Contains fish. to prepare, boil 550ml water and cook noodle block for 3 minutes. Add in sachet contents and stir – cook another 1.5 minutes. Stir and enjoy!

Inside, the noodle block is within its own bag.

The noodle block.

The soup base sachet.

Has a nice scent with pork notes.

A second sachet.

This smells like mayonnaise for sure!

A solid ingredients sachet.

A very nice assortment of what looks to be crab stick, corn, cabbage and other bits.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added pork, spring onion, mung bean sprout and hard boiled egg. The noodles were extremely good – excellent quality and chew to them. Quite a lot of them as well. The broth was really intriguing; indeed, it has the flavor of mayonnaise, but also I get a pork kind of flavor as well; like a creamy mayo pork. It works very well! The added bits hydrated very well and were of great diversity and quality – corn and crab stick among them. 4.75 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4543185001975.

If you’re in the mood for something Japanese and want to try it with mayo style, look no further! Kewpie Mayonnaise (Japanese Mayo) – 500g Net 17.64 FL. OZ.

I think he’s wolfing down mayonnaise and wasabi.

#1446: Myojo Ippei-Chan Jumbo Night Market Style Yakisoba

To start off, thanks to Raissa T. and Andre L. for their help on translating! Today feels like a yakisoba day. I really like yakisoba! It’s a pretty versatile dish; you can add anything to it and it’s still good! Well, strawberry jelly probably isn’t the best add-in… Then again, with that mention perhaps someone will try it and make it the new craze? The latest weird add-in craze was adding those little pudding cups or flan into a Cup Noodle. Bizarre… Well, let’s see how this comes out – looks good on the package! Especially with the amazingly cool little recommendation to…

Enjoy Mayo Beam! Japanese mayo is pretty awesome stuff! I used to rave about Best Foods/Hellman’s, but that Kewpie stuff is top-notch. I thought that Japan was the biggest consumer of mayonnaise, but it turns out the Russian love the stuff – they eat more of it than any other country in the world! What’s interesting too is that a component of yakisoba sauce is Worcestershire sauce, which also is a European thing. Trippy. Let’s dig in!

Her’s the distributor/import sticker (click image to enlarge). Not sure if it contains meat as the label is very light, but it probably does.

Side panel details (click image to enlarge).

The lid (click image to enlarge). To prepare, remove sachets. Add in boiling water to line and re-cover for 3 minutes. Use the orange spout to drain. Add sachet contents and enjoy!

The noodle block.

Bits of cabbage and maybe meat from the bottom of the tray.

The yakisoba sauce sachet.

Has a sweet and Worcestershire scent.

Furikake is mentioned on the front, so I’m guessing that’s what this is.

Furikake is a seasoning often added as a condiment for rice with sesame seeds and seaweed and other tasty bits.

All hail the mayo beam!

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added green onion, bean sprout, sauteed beef and sweet onion. The noodles were your standard tray yakisoba noodle – but with a huge quantity. I would say this was the most food from a noodle tray I’ve seen yet! Unfortunately, although tasty, it didn’t seem that there was enough yakisoba sauce really; the flavor could have been a little stronger. The furikake was a nice touch though, and the mayo beam gave the meal a ray of light! The cabbage and meaty bits hydrated perfectly. 4.5 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 4902881404532.

Yakisoba! Yakisoba!

#1401: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Shiodare Flavor With Black Pepper Mayonnaise

I’m pretty excited – we’re moving to a new apartment soon! I’ve been going through everything, boxing stuff up. Actually, I’m currently flanked by a stack of boxes that’s getting really high – and they’re pretty heavy, too. What’s going to be insane is that we will be moving to a place on the top floor – only one flight of stairs, but it’s a decent amount of stairs. Should be quite a workout! What’s nice is that it’ll be close to a nice big Asian grocery – an HMart – so there will be easy access to everything I need to add to my noodles. Anyways, yeah – pretty big thing. I thought I’d have one I found while packing – no idea how it got to where it was as I usually keep everything in a couple big totes. Let’s check out this yakisoba – with black pepper mayonnaise!

Here are pics from the bottom and sides (click image to enlarge).

Here’s the lid, under the plastic wraps (click image to enlarge). To prepare, open lid to dotted line. Take out the three sachets. Fill to line with boiling water and cover for 3 minutes. Using pour spout, drain. Add the large sachet and stir well. Garnish with the two remaining sachets. Enjoy!

The noodle block.

The uakisoba sauce sachet.

Smells like a sweet yakisoba sauce.

Here are both side of the black pepper mayonnaise sachet.

Here’s another garnish sachet.

Seems to be a combo of seaweed, pepper flake, green onion, and maybe some sugar and slat. If anyone knows exactly what it is, please let me know.

Here’s a little bit of the veggie mix that was in the bottom of the tray. Looks like there’s also a little beef or TVP going on as well.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added sauteed sukiyaki beef and sweet onions. The noodles have the gauge and chew of the rest of Myojo’s yakisoba line – nice and soft with a great chew to them. The flavor was pretty good, although I found it to be missing the normal yakisoba flavor of Worcestershire, it did have a light oil sweetness and saltiness. The mayonnaise and other garnish gave it a nice pepperiness that was nice. The vegetable and meat component hydrated nicely. 3.75 out of 5.0 stars.UPC bar code 4902881403559.

A couple of funny Myojo instant noodle TV advertisements – they look to be a little older.

Re-Review: Myojo Ippei-chan Yakisoba Japanese Style Noodles

I’ve been going through the reviews I’ve done over the years with a fine-toothed comb lately and thought this one was most definitely due to a re-review. I know a lot of people enjoy this one, so let’s give it an in-depth look!


Here’s a close-up of the side panels (click image to enlarge).

Here’s the lid (click image to enlarge).

The noodle block.

The main seasoning packet – liquid.

Has a very nice smell – I definitely notice a tuna scent.

A nice sized sachet of veggies.

Lots of leafy greens in here!

A little packet of spices.

Interesting – not sure what all it is.

The finishing touch – this stuff gets drizzled all over everything at the end.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added stir fry vegetables, sweet onions, kizami shoga (pickled ginger, narutomaki (fish cake – the ones with the spirals), kamaboko (anoth kind of fish cake – the pink half circles), and Urashima Sesame & Salt furikake. This is amazing stuff. The noodles come out so nicely (and authentically). The flavoring is great. Tastes just like yakisoba sauce (which I’m sure it is), which has a Worcestshire taste with other flavors mixed in like tuna. The veggies? Crunchy cabbage works very well. The finishing touch of the mayonnaise mustard is epic – gives it a nice moistness that has a crisp spicy bite. This stuff is excellent – definitely something I would consider gourmet or premium. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 011152012469.

[AMAZONPRODUCTS asin=”B0028PDFQG”]

A Myojo commercial

Funky Soba Bento!!!

#904: Myojo Ippei-chan Yomise-No Yakisoba Oriental Style With Mayonnaise 一平ちゃん

Here’s a new one we got at Uwajimaya. This looks really good! Nothing says tasty like a little bit of Japanese mayonnaise! Let’s check it out!

Here are close-ups of the text on top, the side and the bottom (click to enlarge).

Here’s the lid (click to enlarge). Notice the top left has a pour spout!

The noodle block – big and rectangular.

Here’s the front and back of the yakisoba sauce packet.

A good sized veggie packet.

Looks like some niceties like cabbage and other tasty bits.

Spice packet?

Interesting; I expected chili powder but I taste seaweed and sesame seed.

Here we go! A mayonnaise packet! You can get all artsy with this one – use scissors and cut off a corner to get a thin stream.

Finished (click to enlarge).  Added stir-fry vegetables, some baked chicken with Lindberg-Snider Red Baron BBQ Spice, kizami shoga (pickled ginger) and Urashima Sesame & Salt furikake. The noodles were really nice – floffy and almost buttery. The yakisoba sauce really makes it all quite tasty and the mayonnaise is really a nice addition – adds a bit of interesting comfort food notion. The vegetables were good – primarily cabbage, but it was crunchy! Good stuff – 4.75 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 011152219875 .

What an awesome commercial – squeezing the mayonnaise packets!

A nice little sampling of Japanese commercials from the mid 90’s.