Tag Archives: gb

Meet The Manufacturer: #2025: Urban Noodle Authentic Street Food Chow Mein

Today, we have the last of this Meet The Manufacturer. I’ve really enjoyed most of these quite a bit – I’ll say one thing – they’re not bland like some UK products I’ve had in the past! Today it’s chow mein – let’s give it a try!

Swtail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, empty contents of noodle pouch into box and separate with fork. Add in sauce sachet and close box back up. Microwave for 2 minutes at 650W (my microwave is 1100W with power levels of 1-10, so I’ll be using 6). Stir and enjoy!

The noodle pouch.

The liquid pouch – very large.

Some of the sauce with water chestnuts.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion, Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts and kizami shoga. The noodles came out nice, as did all of the noodles in the set. The flavor however was a kind of black vinegar and sugary sweet mix that just didn’t work for me. Now, this could be a British chow mein to a T, but for me it just didn’t work. However, the water chestnuts were absolutely wonderful. 2.0 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code number 5011673403000.

Best of British Cooking

A few reviews ago, I mentioned a British delicacy that I couldn’t remember the name of. It hit me though – it’s the munchie box; a smorgasbord of all the things a pizza joint will sell and a kind of appetizer tray in a pizza box – and it looks and sounds like amazingness. Here’s a guy eating a pretty big one.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2024: Urban Noodle Authentic Street Food Pad Thai

Okay so here we go. Pad Thai. In an instant and quick prep scenario, pad thai has gone through the ringer. I’ve had pad thai that comes this way be pretty decent, however many I’ve had taste like peanut butter and black vinegar with some chopped nuts on top. It’s not a real tricky one to translate to a processed food, but it seems a lot of the time that companies will draw on certain flavorings and try to mimic the flavor but end up with something completely different. Let’s hit up this one and see how it goes!

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, empty contents of noodle pouch into box and separate with fork. Add in sauce sachet and close box back up. Microwave for 2 minutes at 650W (my microwave is 1100W with power levels of 1-10, so I’ll be using 6). Stir and enjoy!

The noodle pouch.

The large sauce sachet.

Some of the huge sachet of sauce.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added coriander, extra large shrimp, Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts and crushed red pepper flakes. The noodles are flat and broad. They come out of the microwave nicely. The sauce has a flavor that is extremely sweet and has bits of what I believe to be carrot and definitely water chestnut. I would not call this pad thai, but more of a sweet and sour noodle. It’s actually quite good, but it’s poor resemblance to actual pad thai docks some score. Worth a try. 2.5 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 5011673403024.

Jamie Oliver’s Great Britain

A recipe for cooking authentic pad thai at home.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2023: Urban Noodle Authentic Street Food Black Bean

I’m a little curious on this one. See, Jjajang is really popular in China and South Korea; basically noodles with a black bean sauce. I’m curious as to if this is leaning in that direction, or whether it’s something on the Caribbean side; maybe a little citrus going on? Well, one way to find out – let’s crack it open and cook it up!

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, empty contents of noodle pouch into box and separate with fork. Add in sauce sachet and close box back up. Microwave for 2 minutes at 650W (my microwave is 1100W with power levels of 1-10, so I’ll be using 6). Stir and enjoy!

The noodle pouch.

The sauce sachet – very large.

Some of the sauce.

Finished (click to enlarge). The noodles in this one were flat instead of round. They came out very nicely. The flavoring however was just strange. I expected maybe something of a Korean-Chinese fusion dish, but those are hearty and rich and not savory and sweet. In fact, this one was a little too sweet for me. The thinly sliced bamboo shoots don’t work for me either; leaving them whole would be nicer I think. What’s more, it has a kind of chemically aftertaste; like chlorine or soap. 0.0 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 5011673403048.

Great British Cooking: A Well-kept Secret

[youtube url=https://youtu.be/IzcNjFqnrVg[Jamie Oliver shows some black bean cooking.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2022: Urban Noodle Authentic Street Food Thai Red Curry

This sounds like a good one! Red curry i sone I thoroughly enjoy; although I can’t think of a curry I’ve met that I’ve not enjoyed. When I think of curry and the UK, my thoughts immediately wander towards Red Dwarf episodes with Rimmer complaining about Lister reeking of last night’s vindaloo and stale lager. It also wanders to something I saw a couple years ago – in Britain, you can get takeaway boxes full of fried odd and ends – it looks like pure gut bomb amazingness. But I digress – red curry sounds good – let’s dig in!

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, empty contents of noodle pouch into box and separate with fork. Add in sauce sachet and close box back up. Microwave for 2 minutes at 650W (my microwave is 1100W with power levels of 1-10, so I’ll be using 6). Stir and enjoy!

The noodle pouch.

The large sauce sachet.

A thick liquid with a nice scent.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion, crushed red pepper, coriander and Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts. The noodles were nice – decent chewiness and thickness. The flavor on this one was a slightly spicy and acidic curry. Long thin strips of bamboo shoots were abundant as well. 3.0 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 501167340301.

Traditional Old English (British) Recipes (Traditional Old English Recipes) (Volume 1)

Some short introductions to some neat British street food trucks.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2021: Urban Noodle Authentic Street Food Satay

To kick things off, we have the Satay variety. Satay is hugely popular, but I have a feeling most people don’t know the whole story – here’s what Wikipedia has to say about Satay:

Satay (/ˈsæt/, /ˈsɑːt/ sah-tay), modern Indonesian and Malay spelling of sate, is a dish of seasoned, skewered and grilled meat, served with a sauce.[1] Satay may consist of diced or sliced chicken, goat, mutton, beef,pork, fish, other meats, or tofu; the more authentic version uses skewers from the midrib of the coconut palm frond, although bamboo skewers are often used. These are grilled or barbecued over a wood or charcoal fire, then served with various spicy seasonings.

Satay originated in Java, Indonesia.[2][3][4] It is available almost anywhere in Indonesia, where it has become a national dish.[5][6] It is also popular in many other Southeast Asian countries, including Malaysia, Singapore,Brunei, Thailand, the Philippines, as well as in Suriname and the Netherlands, as Indonesia and Suriname are former Dutch colonies.

Satay is a very popular delicacy in Indonesia; the country’s diverse ethnic groups’ culinary arts (see Indonesian cuisine) have produced a wide variety of satays. In Indonesia, satay can be obtained from a travelling satay vendor, from a street-side tent-restaurant, in an upper-class restaurant, or during traditional celebration feasts. In Malaysia, satay is a popular dish—especially during celebrations—and can be found throughout the country. In Southern Philippines it is known as satti.

Close analogues are yakitori from Japan, shish kebab from Turkey and the Middle East, shashlik from the Caucasus, chuanr from China, and sosatie from South Africa. It is listed at number 14 on World’s 50 most delicious foods readers’ poll complied by CNN Go in 2011.[7]

Alright – let’s delve into this, the first of five different varieties I’ll be reviewing for this Meet The Manufacturer.

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, empty noodle pouch into box and separate with a fork. Add sauce sachet contents, close box back up and microwave at 650W for 2 minutes (I have an 1100W microwave with power settings of 1-10 so going to use 6). Stir and enjoy!

The noodle pouch.

The sauce sachet.

A thick liquid with a pleasing scent.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts and spring onion. The noodles had a great chew and gauge to them. Not rubbery from the microwaving, either. The flavor was really great – a nice bit of peanut and a rich satay taste. The omnipresence of baby corn was not only nice, it went perfectly and they were of excellent quality. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 5011673403017.

British Food: An Extraordinary Thousand Years of History

A film showing street food in London’s Greenwich Market.

Meet The Manufacturer: #1963: Kabuto Rice Noodles Vegetable Laksa

Today, we bid a fond farewell to the Kabuto Noodles Meet The Manufacturer. These have all been very unique and innovative products. As I’ve said before, most of the instant varieties I’ve sampled from the UK have been, in a word, bland. Flavorless is another word. These have all had good flavor and great quality. Today, it’s laksa, one of my favorite Southeast Asian flavors. Let’s check it out.

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, remove lid and add boiling water to fill line. Cover loosely and let sit for 3-4 minutes. Stir well and let stand an additional minute. Stir and enjoy!

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

The rice noodle block.

Some bits of sweetcorn and powder with a sweet coconut scent from the pot.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Dodo fishball, laksa leaf, Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts and tau pok. The rice noodles hydrated very nicely here and are broad and flat. The broth has a sweet coconut flavor and a hint of heat. 3.75 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 5060250610348.

Kabuto Noodles Vegetable Laksa 65g – Pack of 6

A head to head challenge between Sophie and Cris – who can eat the most turkey?

Meet The Manufacturer: #1962: Kabuto Rice Noodles Chicken Pho

Up until now, I’ve been reviewing some of Kabuto Noodles’ egg noodles – now it’s time to take a look at their rice noodle varieties to wrap up Meet The Manufacturer. It’s been a while since I’ve reviewed any pho varieties. Pho is a traditional (and wildly popular) Vietnamese noodle soup. Pho involved cooking broth with lots of spices like cinnamon, star anise, stewing beef bones for hours, and with rice noodles. Usually when you get it locally, it comes with jalapeno slices, sweet basil, mung bean sprouts, a little Huy Fong Sriracha sauce and Hoisin sauce. Oh – and there’s a lot of different kinds of meats to choose from – beef flank, tendon, ribeye – and chicken. Let’s check this one out!

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains chicken. To prepare, remove lid and fill to line with boiling water. Loosely cover and let sit 3-4 minutes. Stir and let stand another minute. Stir and enjoy!

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

The rice noodle block.

Some of the seasoning from the pot.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, beef tendon meatball, sweet basil and jalapeno slices. The noodles hydrated well – broad and flat rice noodles. The broth was on the sweet side and had a nice chicken flavor to it. 3.5 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 5060250610331.

Kabuto Noodles Chicken Pho 65g – Pack of 6

Another challenge – this time, Sophie eats as many pancakes as she can in 15 minutes.

Meet The Manufacturer: #1961: Kabuto Noodles Chicken Ramen

Yesterday, I reviewed a chilli chicken offering from Kabuto Noodles. Today, its just chicken ramen. I’m curious if it will just be a less spicy taste or something completely different (yesterday’s pot mentioned it having a lime element while this does not). Either way, sounds good to me. By the way – in the United Kingdom, they refer to noodle cups as noodle pots! Let’s go!

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains chicken. To prepare, remove lid and add boiling water to fill line. Cover loosely and let sit 3-4 minutes. Stir well and let sit another minute. Stir and enjoy!

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

The noodle block.

Some of the included seasoning in the pot.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added leftover fried chicken meat, hard boiled egg and spring onion. The noodles are the standard Kabuto egg noodles – thin and a nice chew. The broth has a very homemade chicken flavor – it comes together more as a homestyle chicken noodle soup taste, but in a Japanese kind of presentation. 4.25 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 5060250610058.

Kabuto Noodles Chicken Ramen (85g) – Pack of 6

The Kabuto Noodles folks challenge eachother to different feats – this time it’s skydiving!

Meet The Manufacturer: #1960: Kabuto Noodles Chilli Chicken Ramen

Chilli chicken, eh? This sounds interesting – not a flavor I think I’ve seen coming out of the UK before (and I’ve seen a lot of interesting ones). By the way – if you’re wondering what coriander is, it’s the same thing as cilantro. Okay – let’s have a look inside this neat ‘pot’ of noodles!

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). contains chicken. To prepare, remove lid and add boiling water to fill line. Cover loosely for 3-4 minutes. Stir well and let sit an additional minute. Stir and enjoy!

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

The noodle block – pre-seasoned.

Some of the seasoning from the inside of the pot.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added leftover fried chicken meat, coriander and red bell pepper. The noodles have that great chew and abundance I’ve been finding very much to my liking – they’re egg noodles and come out very good. The broth is full of little bits of vegetable and has a very nice note of spiciness and the lime is definitely there as well. 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 5060250610164.

Kabuto Noodles Chilli Chicken Ramen (85g) – Pack of 2

A Kabuto Noodles advertisement.

#1424: Sainsbury’s Curry Flavour Instant Noodles

Here’s one that Joe B. and Sarah B. sent me from Nottingham, UK – thanks! I think I’ve only got one more they sent – been fun doing these British varieties! Curry is a really popular British flavor. I’m calling it a British flavor, because there are so many interpretations of curry; the British make curry powders and cook with them – they’re usually less spicy and exotic than something you’d find in Southeast Asia. Anyways, I thought I’d make some chicken to go along with this and use some of the curry leaf that’s growing in my wife’s garden. What’s interesting is that curry leaf isn’t used in curry! It smells like curry powder though. Should be interesting! Let’s check it out.

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add seasoning sachet contents to 250ml water and bring to a boil. Break noodle block into 3 to 4 chunks and cook for 2-3 minutes. Enjoy!

The noodle block.

The seasoning powder sachet.

Has a peculiar scent.

There’s a little flower coming on the curry plant growing in my wife’s patio garden!

.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added chicken baked with curry leaf, garlic salt and Jane’s Krazy Mixed Up Pepper. The noodles are of a familiar gauge and have an agreeable texture. The flavor doesn’t smack of curry though; it’s really kind of hard to explain exactly what it tastes like, but it’s definitely not curry I’ve ever tasted before. Not only that, the flavoring is rather bland. 1.5 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code <01854688>.

The Vindaloovians ploy doesn’t work out on Red Dwarf.

#1315: Sainsbury’s Chicken Flavour Instant Noodles

Here’s one that Joe B. and Sarah B. sent me from Nottingham, UK – thanks! This is a common variety you would find at a store called Sainsbury’s. Sainsbury’s is a chain that can be found throughout England which sells pretty much everything by the looks of it. British varieties usually tend to be on the blander side, as is the way with a lot of food from over there, but sometimes they’re really good. Let’s see which end of the spectrum this one falls into.

Here’s the back of the packaging (click image to enlarge). Has a V for Vegan friendly on the front of the package. To prepare, add noodle block (broken into 3-4 pieces) and contents of sachet to 250ml of boiling water. Cook for 2-3 minutes, stirring often. Enjoy immediately.

Here’s the noodle block. Did pretty well for such a long trip!

The soup base sachet.

A medium-granular affair.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added chicken, corn, carrots and peas. The noodles have a bit of a crumble to them. They’re alright but a little off. The broth has a bland chicken flavor – bland, yes – but it does have a nice chicken flavor. The broth is almost non existent as is the way of most British instants – it’s either skint on broth or more of a gravy and this Sainsbury’s variant is no different. 2.75 out of 5.0 stars.UPC bar code <01854619>.

I haven’t seen any packaged noodles touting their support of sustainable palm oil (I believe these from Sainsbury’s are the first). Palm oil is used in lots of things, but often instant noodles. Palm oil production has a side effect of taking up valuable habitat for animal life as well as depletion of forests/jungles around the world. Here is a short presentation about sustainable palm oil by the World Wildlife Fund.

#1252: Tesco Instant Noodles Chow Mein Flavour

Here’s one that Joe B. and Sarah B. sent me from Nottingham, UK – thanks! Tesco’s a big grocery store chain in England. Let’s try out their chow mein!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Looks to be meat-free but check for yourself. To prepare, boil 250ml water and contents of seasoning sachet in a pot. Break noodle block into 3 or 4 pieces and cook for 2-3 minutes.

Here’s the noodle block.

The seasoning sachet.

Has an odd scent; almost like Worcestershire but not quite.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added leeks, broccoli, sweet onion, green onions and chicken I sauteed with some light soy sauce. The noodles aren’t bad – your basic instant. Decent texture and chew. The flavoring is really quite good – there’s just not enough of it. These noodles are quite bland. I will say once paired with the additions it went well, but separately wasn’t very impressive. 2.25 out of 5.0 stars.UPC bar code 5010204862484>.

Looks like they have some neat innovations in the UK – check out how your shopping experience may look some day.