Tag Archives: bacon

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: TTL Carbonara White Wine Carbonara Instant Noodle – Taiwan

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: TTL Carbonara White Wine Sauce Instant Noodle - Taiwan

Happy to be revisiting this variety, It made The Ramen Rater’s Top Ten Instant Noodles Of All Time 2018 Edition list this year and with good reason: it’s really, really good. Here’s a little about carbonara from Wikipedia –

Carbonara (Italian: [karboˈnaːra]) is an Italian pasta dish from Rome[1][2] made with egg, hard cheeseguanciale (or pancetta), and pepper.

The recipe is not fixed by a specific type of hard cheese or pasta. The cheese is usually Pecorino Romano.[1] Spaghetti is the usual pasta, however, fettuccinerigatonilinguine, or bucatini are also used. Either guanciale or pancetta can be used. Another common substitute outside Italy is lardons of smoked bacon.

The dish was created in the middle of the 20th century.[3]

As with many recipes, the origins of the dish and its name are obscure.

The dish forms part of a family of dishes involving pasta with bacon, cheese, and pepper, such as spaghetti alla gricia. Indeed, it is very similar to the Italian pasta cacio e uova, dressed with melted lard and mixed eggs and cheese.[4]

There are many theories for the origin of the name, which may be more recent than the dish itself.[4] Since the name is derived from carbonaro (the Italian word for charcoal burner), some believe the dish was first made as a hearty meal for Italian charcoal workers.[1] In parts of the United States the etymology gave rise to the term “coal miner’s spaghetti”. It has even been suggested that it was created as a tribute to the Carbonari (“charcoalmen”), a secret society prominent in the early, repressed stages of Italian unification.[19] It seems more likely that it is an urban dish from Rome,[20] although it has nothing to do with the Roman restaurant of the same name.[21]

The name may also have derived from “Carbonada”, the word for bacon in central Italy’s dialect.[22]

Pasta alla carbonara is unrecorded before the Second World War; notably, it is absent from Ada Boni‘s 1930 La Cucina Romana. The dish is first attested in 1950, when it was described in the Italian newspaper La Stampa as a dish sought by the American officers after the allied liberation of Rome in 1944.[23] It was described as a Roman dish, when many Italians were eating eggs and bacon supplied by troops from the United States.[24] It was included in Elizabeth David‘s Italian Food, an English-language cookbook published in Great Britain in 1954.[25]

There’s a ton of info about carbonara! Let’s give it a try!

TTL Carbonara White Wine Sauce Instant Noodle

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: TTL Carbonara White Wine Sauce Instant Noodle - Taiwan

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains pork. To prepare, cook noodles in 500ml boiling water. Tip – place retort pouch in to heat it as well. Cook for 3 minutes. Add soup sachet to 200ml boiling water to make soup. Drain noodle after 3 minutes cooking and combine with retort pouch contents. Finally, stir and enjoy! Note – soup is not combined with noodles but served alongside as shown in image below.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: TTL Carbonara White Wine Sauce Instant Noodle - Taiwan

The noodle block.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: TTL Carbonara White Wine Sauce Instant Noodle - Taiwan

The soup base sachet.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: TTL Carbonara White Wine Sauce Instant Noodle - Taiwan

A light powder.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: TTL Carbonara White Wine Sauce Instant Noodle - Taiwan

A liquid sachet.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: TTL Carbonara White Wine Sauce Instant Noodle - Taiwan

White wine.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: TTL Carbonara White Wine Sauce Instant Noodle - Taiwan

A large retort pouch.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: TTL Carbonara White Wine Sauce Instant Noodle - Taiwan

A thick white sauce with pork.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added chashu pork, scallions and fried onion. Noodles come out right right for the sauce which is more than enough to hug every curve of them. The flavor is a rich and creamy one with elegant white wine notes. Included pork in the sauce goes extremely well. As for the sipping soup, it’s exceedingly good – like a cream of chicken.. A very apt pairing. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 4710199110850.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: TTL Carbonara White Wine Sauce Instant Noodle - Taiwan

[ 台酒TTL ] Taiwan TTL (White Wine / Red Wine ) Pasta Instant Noodles 1 bags (3packs) 台灣泡麵 (白酒/紅酒)帕式達一袋三入裝 (White Wine Pasta)

Watch me cook this one on Instant Noodle Recipe Time!

#2293: Nissin Nupasta Bacon In Carbonara Sauce Flavour Instant Noodle

Another leftover from the Nissin Hong Kong Meet The Manufacturer – thanks again! Been waiting for the right day to review this one – I should mention today actually is November 8th, 2016 – election day here in the United States. You see, I’m about sixty reviews ahead of myself. How? Well, I usually try to do two reviews a day – and been doing that for a while. I used to only do one a day and if I missed a day I would have to scramble to do a review and post it the same day etc etc. I can hear it ‘oh my god you eat two packs of instant noodles every day?’ Of course not; people reviewing wines don’t chug down a whole bottle to decide what they think of it. I take a couple spoons of broth and a few bites of noodle. In fact, I would say that after reviewing two bowls of noodles, I’ve maybe had the equivalent of 1/3 of a bowl, so there you go. This way if I need to take a couple days off, I can. Well, by now we know who is the new president when you’re seeing this. My daughter Miriam will have been born and Christmas may be over. Crazy. Well, let’s try this one – the cup version was in this year’s The Ramen Rater’s top Ten Instant Noodle Cups Of all Time list – let’s check the pack out!

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains pork (lard). To prepare, add noodles to 250ml boiling water and cook for 3 minutes. Add in sachet contents and cook over medium heat until sauce thickens. Stir and enjoy!

The noodle block.

The sauce powder sachet.

A lot of light powder.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added pork, sweet onion and garlic sauteed in a little butter with some salt. The noodles are great – good gauge and chewiness – they feel like an Italian pasta versus an Asian noodle if that makes sense. The sauce is a luscious white with a bacon taste throughout. Very rich and very tasty. I wouldn’t have pegged Hong Kong to be the source of this in a million years – it’s just wonderful! 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 4897878190034.

Nissin Demae Ramen Variety Pack (6 Flavors)

A recipe for spaghetti carbonara.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2079: Nissin Nupasta Carbonara Flavour Instant Noodle

Well this looks interesting – Italian inspired pasta in a take out box style package. Reminds me of the Cup Noodles Pasta Style from Japan a reviewed before – at least in color scheme and design on the package. It looks like it stops there though! Let’s see what we’ve got here!

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains chicken and pork. To prepare, remove lid and add in contents of clear sachets. Add cold water to fill line. Microwave at 700W for 6 minutes, 30 seconds (use this tool to convert for your microwave). Add in contents of green sachet. Stir and enjoy!

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

The noodle block.

The first of two garnish sachets.

Bacon is mentioned in the ingredients.

The second garnish sachet.

I did mention bacon, right? Mushrooms too!

The powder sachet.

Has a nice cheese scent.

Finished (click to enlarge). I’ll be honest; after converting the cold water instructions from 800W to 1100W microwaving, I was a little worried that 4 minutes and 20 second in hour microwave would pretty much obliterate this stuff. Fortunately, I was absolutely wrong. The noodles came out very, very well. They have a very fresh quality to them and a decent quantity. The vegetables and meats hydrated and cooked great – little bits of bacon, mushroom and other stuff throughout. The flavor was just great too – the white powder turned into a sauce with perfect thickness and quantity – and it tasted like an alfredo sauce. This was just plain awesome. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 4897878660018.

NISSIN Nupasta Bacon In Cabonara Instant Noodles (94gX4)

A recipe for spaghetti carbonara.

The Ramen Rater’s Top Ten Instant Noodle Snacks Of All Time 2016 Edition

Instant noodle… snacks? Yeah! Snacks of all kinds have come from instant noodles – candy, crunchy bits, you name it. They’re popular all over Asia and also the United States; have you ever taken a pack of instant noodles, crushed them and added in the seasoning and shaken the bag up and eaten them like potato chips or popcorn? Well, this is popular elsewhere as well! Let’s check out my favorite instant noodle snacks from over 1,900 reviews. Enjoy!

#10: Wei Lih What’s That? Leisure Meatballs Spicy Chicken Flavor – Taiwan

They’re crunchy and light. They have a slight sweetness and a spiciness that is very slight but builds the more you eat. Original review

#9: Mamee Monster Snek Mi Perisa Ayam – Malaysia

2016_1_16_tts_003

The noodles are nice and crunchy. They have that lightness you would expect from an uncooked instant noodle, but not really oily as some can be. The flavoring is light and has a salty and almost sesame oil kind of flavor to it. Original review

#8: A-Sha Prince Katsu Snack Noodles – Taiwan

They’re very light and crunchy and have a nice salty and crunchy appeal to them. There’s a bit of a sweet and garlic or onion kind of thing going on as well as a hint of spiciness. Original review

#7: J.J. Snek Mi Perisa BBQ – Malaysia

The noodles are crunchy and have a nice flavor to them – very much reminding me of fried chicken from a well known restaurant chain. These were very good! Original review

#6: Samyang Foods Star Popeye Ramyun Snack – South Korea

It’s very crunchy and the noodles have a very light cinnamon note to them. The sugaryness of the rock candy brings this out in a nice way. Original review

#5: Mama Rangers Snack Noodles Shrimp Tom Yum Flavour – Myanmar

The snack noodle pieces are very short. The have a nice crunch to them. The flavor is that of a sweet tom yum, with a hint of spiciness, an unmistakable hit of lemongrass, and definitely tastes like sugary tom yum. It’s a nice flavor and was enjoyable. Original review

#4: Oyatsu Baby Star Snack Noodle Yakisoba Flavor – Japan

These short lengths of noodle are great. They’re light and crunchy. The flavor is that of yakisoba, so a little Worcestershire and salt and spices. It’s great stuff! Original review

#3: Ve Wong Little Prince Bacon – Taiwan

These little crunchy bits of noodles have a great bacon flavor. The big bag comes with a ton of little bags. My wife and I found these at an Asian grocery near Disneyland during our honeymoon – bacon snacks!  Original review

#2: Komforte Chockolates Savory Ramen – United States

The chocolate was exceedingly good – a really nice 53% dark chocolate I enjoyed thoroughly – premium stuff. It’s not so dark that it will put off the milkies and not so light on cacao that it lacks richness. The bits of noodles were nice and crunchy, and not hard like a rock. The soy, onion and garlic flavors were very much muted by the rich chocolate flavor, but that wasn’t a horrible thing. Original review

#1: Mamee Monster Snek Mi Perisa Pedas – Malaysia

I really like the crunch of the noodles; they seem a little different than the other Mamee Monster varieties; they’re really crispy, but maybe have a little more give to them. They have a nice spicy flavor to them which was great and a little bit of sweetness and more spiciness from the seasoning – excellent snacks. Original review

The Ramen Rater’s Top Ten Instant Noodle Add-Ons Of All Time 2015 Edition

In the last few years, I’ve seen a large amount of articles with titles like ‘Best Ramen Hacks,’ ‘Pimp Your Ramen’ and so on. These titles fall under the category of clickbait – using hipster terminology and such to entice one to click on them. Usually, they’re all things people know about already; vegetables, oils and such. This is a list of my favorite add-ons and garnishes. While some may be familiar to you, others may not be. It’s also geared to help you navigate the Asian Grocery, a place many find to be alien to them but I have found to be one of the most vibrant and wonderful places I visit very regularly. Finally, I also included some tips of storage and how long these products last for those on a tight budget. In no particular order, here’s this new list!

Chinese Sausage

Often found on end caps, either refrigerated or on the shelf. Chinese sausage pairs quite well with spicy, beef, pork, spicy beef and spicy pork varieties from China and Taiwan. They sausage is wrinkly on the outside kind of like a beef stick and has a sweet taste. I freeze these (they’ll last a long time without freezer burn) and then take out a link and slice in thin pieces. They’re easy to slice when frozen. Toss in at any point while cooking the noodles and they’ll add a little protein and a little oiliness to the broth.

Tofu Puff / Tau Pok

These can be found not surprisingly with the myriad of tofu varieties. They’re like little spongy cubes of delight! Just take one out and cut in half (I use kitchen scissors) and drop in your instant noodles. I like them primarily with curries. They often will have 2 weeks on them in the refrigerator – I’ve never frozen them and guess that wouldn’t work very well.

Mung Bean Sprouts

Mung bean sprouts should be pretty easy to get anywhere. I prefer a brand called Salad Cosmo; they seem to stay fresh a lot longer. Mung bean sprouts are very perishable, so get them in the refrigerator as soon as you get home from the store. They have a very short life – maybe 3-5 days refrigerated. They add a nice crunch to any instant noodles.

Fish Cake

There are tons of different kinds of fish cake out there – kamaboko (looks like a little loaf on a piece of wood), narutomaki (a tube with a swirl pattern), and Busan fish cake (a fried South Korean delicacy). Fishcake usually is comprised of processed fish that is steamed or fried. Prep them by slicing thin and put a few pieces in a ziploc and put in the freezer. They tend to stick to eachother, so using multiple ziplocs works best. They’ll stay in good condition frozen for quite a long time. Of course, these work very well with seafood varieties, both Japanese and South Korea, and also in traditional Japanese varieties like shoyu and miso. They’re either refrigerated or frozen at the store.

Cilantro / Coriander

This leafy green is known either by cilantro or coriander. It adds a nice savory flavor to instant noodles when dropped on top as a garnish. The trick with picking coriander is looking at the leaves. If they look saggy or wilted, skip ’em. If you see one lone bunch sitting where many should be, it’s probably going to go bad really quick as well. What I do is get a nice looking bunch and bring it home, give it a rinse under cold water, pat dry with paper towl and put in a loose plastic produce bag (grab an extra while shopping) in the crisper in our refrigerator. If your refrigerator runs a little on the cold side, they’ll go bad quicker, but since a bunch usually is under a dollar, just go and get more. Under perfect conditions, they should last 3-4 days.

Korean BBQ Meat

If you want to add beef or pork to your instant noodles and you’re on a budget, this is going to save you a ton of money. Go to where they have the packaged meats. Chances are you’ll find a ton of different cuts of pork and beef – and they’re sliced like bacon! You can find beef sliced this way and get a few pounds for under $10USD . Get a big box of ziplocs and put about 3-4 slices in each one and then put them all in a big freezer ziploc. You can get about 20 portions out of it and all you need to do is either defrost and fry it in a pan or just drop in boiling water and let the fat also flavor your broth.

Fishball

I first discovered Taiwanese fishball – these are hollow and sometimes have crab, or fish eggs inside. I have found I prefer the Malaysian or Singaporean varieties – Dodo brand is quite good. These are solid and come in an array of flavors like cuttlefish, lobster and prawn. These will be at the seafood counter or frozen in bags. Just boil them (for freshly made fishball, boil until they float). These work great in the freezer, but if they get a little freezer burn, they’ll get a little rubbery. I like fishball in seafood and curry varieties.

Eggs

The thin shelled ovum of the domestic fowl can be found at most any grocery store. Fried on Mi Goreng, hard boiled with anything, stirred in with boiling broth, they work very well. I get asked ‘how do you get your eggs look that way’ when I make South Korean varieties sometimes. Well, it’s very common in Korea to simply drop a raw egg yolk ion a steaming hot bowl of ramyun. What I do is crack and egg into a ladle and rock it back and forth, letting the clear white of the egg spill out. There’s a little piece left which I’ll snip away. Drop on top of your noodles and stir it in. Eggs are relatively inexpensive and stay good for a long time.

Pepper Strands (Ito Toiughrasi)

I have only found these once and they were in a large Korean supermarket with the dehydrated chillies and pepper powders. They’re extremely thin threads of chilli pepper that you can put on your instant noodles to give a neat little gourmet look. I found that they add a hint of spiciness to the broth. A bag of these will last forever since you only need to use a small amount. Stoe in a ziploc after opening and put in your cupboard.

Carved Squid

You can buy fresh squid, carve crosshatched slices in it, cut it in strips and boil, or you can just buy a nice bag of frozen carved squid! They’re great in seafood instant noodles and have a nice texture and flavor to them. These will stay fine in the freezer for months – put them in a freezer bag once opened.

 

Got any favorite garnishes? Share them with me in a comment and they might make next years list!

#943: Amino Kuchnia Polska Żurek

Here’s another new one from Joe & Gill of the UK! Wow! This is something brand new to me – instant noodles from Poland?! Yup they sure are. But what the heck is ‘Żurek?’ Well, Wikipedia has this to say:

The sour rye soup is a soup made of souredryeflour (akin to sourdough) and meat (usually boiled pork sausage or pieces of smoked sausage, bacon or ham). It is specific to Poland, where it is known as żur or żurek, and a variant is known as barszcz biały (“white barszcz“) which is made with wheat flour instead of rye. The soup is also found in the cuisines of other western Slavic nations such as Slovakia (kyslóvka). A variation of this soup is found in Czech Republic (kyselo – with mushrooms and without meat) and Lithuania.

Okay that’s cool – I have some ham I could add… Wikipedia continues:

In Poland it is sometimes served in an edible bowl made of bread or with boiled potatoes. The recipe varies from region to region.

In Silesia, a type of sour rye soup known as żur śląski is served in a bowl, poured over mashed potatoes. In the Podlaskie region, it is common to eat żurek with halved hard-boiled eggs.

In Poland żurek is traditionally eaten at Easter, but is also popular during other parts of the year. It is usually served with bread or buns, and sometimes flavored with bits of sausage, often in the plate made of bread.

I’ve got eggs too, so I think I’ll add some ham and hard boil an egg (of course after I have sampled the broth and noodles first for the review).

The import sticker (imported into England, that is).

The back of the package (click image to enlarge).

A big chunk of the noodle block.

The seasoning packet. A good sized one with a lot inside.

The powdered seasoning. Has a smoky scent and a definite sausage flavor – interesting!

Finished (click image to enlarge). I added thin sliced ham, sweet onion, some hard boiled egg and a bit of black pepper. The noodles aren’t bad – nothing amazing though. A nice texture that one would expect from instant noodles. The broth is very interesting. A light, smoked meat flavor – like smoked sausage. Interesting stuff. 3.25 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 5900300587728 .

Here’s a recipe for Żurek.

Cool sounding track..

#562: Batchelors Super Noodles Bacon Flavour

When I mentioned I would be reviewing this to my friend Matthew B., he exclaimed ‘bacon is the opiate of the masses!’ I would have to agree; there is nothing on this planet as good as the prince of foods, bacon. With that, I present for your viewing pleasure, bacon flavored British instant noodles. Thanks again, Cindy!

Yep – bacon flavor! How awesome is that? Mentioning hot sauce on the back was nice to see too!

Click image to enlarge. Here’s the back of the package – this one isn’t one of the ‘cash inside’ contest ones.

The single packet contained a goodly amount of fluffy yellow/brownish powder. Smelled like bacon too!

Click image to enlarge. I think its pretty obvious; I like eggs with my noodles. But I also had to put some toast in the mix on this one to make it a balanced breakfast. Just looking at the noodles themselves, they were of a decent quality, and the sauce/flavor was great! A mild bacon flavor that was quite enjoyable – how awesome is this? Uber awesome. 4.25 out of 5.0 stars! Pick some up here.

Batchelors Super Noodles advert!

This is the holy grail of bacon: the famous Bacon Explosion.

#499: Dragonfly Artificial Beef Flavor Instant Noodles

I was quite happy to see a few new big bowl style instant noodles when I was at an Asian grocery the other day, especially Dragonfly brand – I think I’ve only reviewed a single solitary Dragonfly instant noodle thus far. Now I think there’s at least four or five to do! Well, let’s start with this one. Beefalicious? Let’s hope so – I mean it IS the review before the big psychological number 500!

Alrighty here we go! First, a nice new fork – it’s in the Included Forks report – the 9/7/2011 update. As for the seasoning sachets, from left to right we have liquid sauce, veggies and finally the dry powder seasoning.

Doesn’t look all that exciting here – the liquid smells kind of nice…

Click image to enlarge. Added one fried egg. Well, I’m extremely pleased with this one! The first bite had some unexpected spiciness – strange spiciness! All I can say is that it was a slightly hot flavor with hints of beef and an almost bacon like finish. The broth was very nice – had just enough oil from the liquid packet to be very reminiscent of a beef broth. The veggies were amazing – carrot and cabbage notes made everything very well balanced. I was sad that the meal had to end. I highly recommend it and happily give it 4.75 out of 5.0 stars.

Well, I found Dragonfly Brand mentioned in this instructional video…

A few months ago when I was on Anacortes’ KWLE 1340AM ‘The Whale!’

#447: Ve Wong Little Prince Brand Snack Noodles Bacon Flavor

So I wasn’t sure what this was at first – I figured by the color that they were shrimp flavored or something. Then I looked below and saw…

Bacon? Oh sweet! Jackpot! Receive bacon! Twenty little five gram baggies of bacon flavor noodle snacks!

Here’s one of the little bags. They’re very small and a quick snack to remind you that you are going to be hungry later and that bacon is tasty.

Bacon tasty noodle snack unveiled. So how did it taste? Freakin’ awesome – like bacon flavored little bits of crunchy noodles! I’m wondering if it would be worth it to try and add them to some boiling water and make bacon ramen with them… I dunno. I will say this though – they’re excellent. 4.75 out of 5.0 stars!

A Little Prince TV commercial.