Tag Archives: マルちゃん

#2799: Maruchan Kitsune Soba

#2799: Maruchan Kitsune Soba

Here’s another neat one from Zenpop.JP. Thank you! So Zenpop has all sorts of monthly boxes including ramen boxes. Nine instant ramen in one box for a good price – check ’em out! Here’s what they had to say about this one –

Kitsune means ‘fox’ in Japanese and Kitsune soba is topped with fried tofu, which according to folklore, fox spirits are fond of. Since this product is made to sell in the Kanto area, where Tokyo in included, the soup has a stronger flavor of shoyu compared to the Kansai one.

sounds good to me – let’s crack it open

Maruchan Kitsune Soba – Japan

#2799: Maruchan Kitsune Soba

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains pork and fish. To prepare, add everything to the bowl and boiling water to line. Cover for 3 minutes. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2799: Maruchan Kitsune Soba

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2799: Maruchan Kitsune Soba

The noodle block.

#2799: Maruchan Kitsune Soba

The kitsune!

#2799: Maruchan Kitsune Soba

Loose bits from the bowl.

#2799: Maruchan Kitsune Soba

The soup base sachet.

#2799: Maruchan Kitsune Soba

Lots of powder.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts and shichimi togarashi. Noodles had a kind of chew that seemed like they would do so much better dry than in soup. The broth was so salty and strong that it was just kind of gross to me. The saving grace of the kitsune was the only thing keeping this from the stripey hole. 0.25 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4901990529211.

#2799: Maruchan Kitsune Soba

Maruchan Aka Kitsune Udon Cup, 3.39-Ounce Units (Pack of 12)

An older Maruchan TV spot

#2753: Maruchan Tempura Udon

#2753: Maruchan Tempura Udon Japan Crate Umnai Crate www.japancrate.com

Today, we have one that was part of Japan Crate’s Umai Crate. So Japan Crate is a subscription service which has all sorts of different options for you. pretty neat stuff from Japan! There’s a coupon code for you too – just use THERAMENRATER to get a special discount at check out.

Here’s a little something from Wikipedia about udon –

Udon (饂飩, usually written as うどん) is a type of thick wheat flour noodle of Japanese cuisine. It is similar to Italian vermicelli, a wheat flour noodle of similar size.

Udon is often served hot as a noodle soup in its simplest form, as kake udon, in a mildly flavoured broth called kakejiru, which is made of dashisoy sauce, and mirin. It is usually topped with thinly chopped scallions. Other common toppings include tempura, often prawn or kakiage (a type of mixed tempura fritter), or aburaage, a type of deep-fried tofu pockets seasoned with sugar, mirin, and soy sauce. A thin slice of kamaboko, a halfmoon-shaped fish cake, is often added. Shichimi can be added to taste.

The flavor of broth and topping vary from region to region. Usually, dark brown broth, made from dark soy sauce (koikuchi shōyu), is used in eastern Japan, and light brown broth, made from light soy sauce (usukuchi shōyu), is used in western Japan. This is even noticeable in packaged instant noodles, which are often sold in two different versions for east and west.

Alright – let’s crack open this cup from Japan!

Maruchan Tempura Udon – Japan

#2753: Maruchan Tempura Udon Japan Crate Umnai Crate www.japancrate.com

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains fish. and possibly pork. To prepare, add boiling water to fill line and cover for 3 minutes. Add in liquid base. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2753: Maruchan Tempura Udon Japan Crate Umnai Crate www.japancrate.com

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2753: Maruchan Tempura Udon Japan Crate Umnai Crate www.japancrate.com

The noodle block.

#2753: Maruchan Tempura Udon Japan Crate Umnai Crate www.japancrate.com

Loose bits from the cup.

#2753: Maruchan Tempura Udon Japan Crate Umnai Crate www.japancrate.com

A liquid base sachet affixed to the lid.

#2753: Maruchan Tempura Udon Japan Crate Umnai Crate www.japancrate.com

Has a sweet and soy scent.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added kamaboko, Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts and spring onion. The noodles are as most instant udon – broad and flat. They definitely weren’t spongy – something I liked. The broth is a kind of sweet soy and fish flavor. The tempura was here and there. 3.5 out of 5.0 stars.  JAN bar code 4901990330961.

#2753: Maruchan Tempura Udon Japan Crate Umnai Crate www.japancrate.com

Maru-chan delicious soup Tempura U d o n 68g ~ 12 meals

Super classy TV spot

#2749: Maruchan Bariuma Goboten Udon

#2749: Maruchan Bariuma Goboten Udon

I looked around a bit and read that these big things in here are burdock tempura. Should be interesting – if you don’t know about burdock, here’s some info  from Wikipedia –

The taproot of young burdock plants can be harvested and eaten as a root vegetable. While generally out of favour in modern European cuisine, it remains popular in Asia. Arctium lappa is known as “niúbàng” (牛蒡) in Chinese, which was borrowed into Japanese as gobō, and is still eaten in both countries. In Korea burdock root is called “u-eong” (우엉) and sold as “tong u-eong” (통우엉), or “whole burdock”. Plants are cultivated for their slender roots, which can grow about one metre long and two centimetres across. Burdock root is very crisp and has a sweet, mild, and pungent flavour with a little muddy harshness that can be reduced by soaking julienned or shredded roots in water for five to ten minutes.

Immature flower stalks may also be harvested in late spring, before flowers appear; their taste resembles that of artichoke, to which the burdock is related. The stalks are thoroughly peeled, and either eaten raw, or boiled in salt water.[7] Leaves are also eaten in spring in Japan when a plant is young and leaves are soft. Some A. lappa cultivars are specialized for this purpose. A popular Japanese dish is kinpira gobō (金平牛蒡), julienned or shredded burdock root and carrot, braised with soy saucesugarmirin and/or sake, and sesame oil. Another is burdock makizushi (sushi filled with pickled burdock root; the burdock root is often artificially coloured orange to resemble a carrot).

Alrighty then – let’s dig in!

Maruchan Bariuma Goboten Udon – Japan

#2749: Maruchan Bariuma Goboten Udon

The distributor/import sticker (click to enlarge).

#2749: Maruchan Bariuma Goboten Udon

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains fish. To prepare, add sachet contents  350ml boiling water and cover for 5 minutes.Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2749: Maruchan Bariuma Goboten Udon

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2749: Maruchan Bariuma Goboten Udon

The noodle block.

#2749: Maruchan Bariuma Goboten Udon

A dual sachet.

#2749: Maruchan Bariuma Goboten Udon

Powder soup base.

#2749: Maruchan Bariuma Goboten Udon

Togarashi.

#2749: Maruchan Bariuma Goboten Udon

Large pieces of tempura as well as kamaboko.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion. Okay so the udon is the standard udon you’ll find in bowls like this – not chewy and broad with a bit of thickness. Very soft tooth to them. The broth was exceedingly salty, almost to the point of inedibility. What drove the edibility car off the road and into a fiery  tragedy for the mouth was the burdock. This just was so poorly executed and just did not work whatsoever. It was like eating thick potato skin that had been under a heatlamp in a gas station hot case. I mean really – even though there was a little tempura going on, a little kamaboko too, they were overshadowed by the Asian jojos of horror. Don’t get me wrong – I like burdock – a scant amount in my kimbap is alright, but this was just nasty. Disgusted and very surprised. 0.0 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4901990521949,901990521949,

#2749: Maruchan Bariuma Goboten Udon

12 pack Akai kitsune Udon (6pack) and Midori no Tanuki Soba (6pack) set

A Maruchan TV spot

The Ramen Rater’s Top Ten Japanese Instant Noodles Of All Time 2018 Edition

Recently, I added a chat feature to The Ramen Rater, allowing readers to comment and ask me questions directly. It’s been very eye-opening; great to hear about why people are here and what they’re interested in seeing. One thing I have been asked repeatedly is ‘when will there be an update to the Japan list?’ Well, I heard you. The last list came out in 2014. I’ve been reviewing a LOT of Japanese varieties lately, and it looks like there will be an influx of Japanese varieties for the foreseeable future crossing my desk. This most likely will be an annual list from now on. With that being said I should also mention that with the huge amount of varieties that are released annually in Japan, many are discontinued. While this is the ‘of all time list,’ spanning all my reviews, I try to make sure that what is on it is available. This is very hard with Japanese varieties. Finally, I should mention also that if you’re an instant noodle manufacturer from Japan or elsewhere for that matter and you’d like me to review your products, I encourage you to use the contact form and drop me a line. That being said, let’s take a look at this new list, encompassing my favorite and most memorable reviews from the over 2,500 reviews I’ve done to date.

The Ramen Rater’s Top Ten Japanese Instant Noodles Of All Time 2018 Edition

Video Presentation

This video includes images and commentary on The Ramen Rater’s Top Ten Japanese Instant Noodles Of All Time 2018 Edition.

The Ramen Rater’s Top Ten Japanese Instant Noodles Of All Time 2018 Edition

#10: Nissin Men Shokunin Kaoruyasai Shio

top ten japanese #10: Nissin Men Shokunin Kaoruyasai Shio

The noodles are very, very good – a really nice thinnish gauge with a strong backbone and just the nicest little bit of crumble to them – almost dainty. the broth is thick and rich shio with a lot of pork and chicken flavor throughout. The included cabbage, sesame seeds and other veggies are just perfect. Original review

#9: Nissin Cup Noodle Light+ Bagna Cauda

#9: Nissin Cup Noodle Light+ Bagna Cauda

The Cup Noodle Light+ series has really impressed me; amazing how much flavor you get out of a low-cal cup. The noodles have a really nice quality to them – not mushy or anything; they’re just really good. The broth is saucy and hearty with a cheese and light fish taste which is augmented with vegetables galore. This is on the top ten cups list and now on the top ten japanese list. Original review

#8: Nissin Raoh Hot & Sour Ramen

#9: Nissin Cup Noodle Light+ Bagna Cauda

Nissin’s Raoh is a range of premium varieties. The noodle are great – excellent chew and backbone. The broth is serious business – oily, rich in color and has a nice hot and sour taste. Original review

#7: Sapporo Ichiban Otafuku Okonomi Sauce Yakisoba

#7: Sapporo Ichiban Otafuku Okonomi Sauce Yakisoba

I’ve always really loved yakisoba and this is the best I’ve found in an instant form yet. Otofuku is a brand of yakisoba sauce that can be found almost anywhere, and it’s inclusion in this one is just perfection. What’s more, the noodles are garnished with green laver (flaked seaweed) and a little mayonnaise packet! Original review

#6: New Touch Sugomen Niigata Seabura Shoyu Ramen

#6: New Touch Sugomen Niigata Seabura Shoyu Ramen

The noodles hydrated very well and have one seriously good chew to them. The broth is equally amazing – a purely elegant shoyu broth with a good oiliness and great flavor. The vegetable bits hydrated very well and were of excellent quality. To top it off, it comes with a happy little slice of pork, which comes out just right. Original review

#5: Maruchan Gotsumori Sauce Yakisoba

#5: Maruchan Gotsumori Sauce Yakisoba

This big tray of yakisoba was a very nice surprise. First, there’s a lot of noodles here – easily enough for two. Second, the flavor has a little hint of spiciness. Thirdly, the cabbage hydrated very nicely with a tantalizing crunch. Finally, the inclusion of Kewpie mayonnaise sealed the deal for me. Original review

#4: Marutai Hakata Tonkotsu Ramen

#4: Marutai Hakata Tonkotsu Ramen

The noodles came out just right – nice firmness and chew with that groovy flouriness Hakata ramen noodle have. The broth is luxuriant – nice and thick with a rich pork flavor and garlic taste. Just top notch tonkotsu. Original review

#3: Seven & I Gold Sumire Ramen

#3: Seven & I Gold Sumire Ramen

The noodles are thick and chewy – very premium. The broth has a very rich miso flavor that had a little thickness and a nice oiliness. The vegetables and bits hydrated perfectly – nice bits of ground meat and menma float happily about and are of good quality. Original review

#2: Tokushima Seifun Yakibuta Ramen

#2: Tokushima Seifun Yakibuta Ramen

The broth has a nice saltiness and soy flavor with just a little touch of sweetness. The pork flavor finds it’s way into the broth as well which is spectacular. The pork has a nice sweetness and ‘fall off the bone’ texture to it which is pure delicacy. The army of decent sized slices of narutomaki were amazing, and the spring onion and bamboo shoots were perfect. A bowl of amazing taste and quality. Original review

#1: Nissin Gyoretsu-no-Dekiru-Mise-no-Ramen (Shrimp Tantanmen

#1: Nissin Gyoretsu-no-Dekiru-Mise-no-Ramen (Shrimp Tantanmen

Talk about amazing. Now, on most of these bowls, you’ll notice I’ve added my own garnishes. I don’t count them in my reviewing – everything is reviewed prior to any additions I make. This is one where I’ve added nothing and just look at it! This one had very good noodles to start off. The broth was a very thick prawn infused decadent flavor spectacle. Then there’s the little crunchy topping and the other garnish they provide and this is just amazing stuff. Wow. Floored. The top of ther Top Ten Japanese varieties Original review

#2635: Maruchan Nagomi-an Curry Udon

#2635: Maruchan Nagomi-an Curry Udon - Japan - The Ramen Rater - zenpop zenpop.jp

Here’s another one from ZenPop. Zenpop offers a wide variety of Japanese product boxes to your door – lots of stationary and ramen as well – check em out! Here’s what they had to say about this curry udon –

Udon in curry soup! Though curry has its origin in India, Japanese curry has followed its own unique path and now tastes quite differently compared to the original one. Pork based curry soup spiced up with soy sauce and bonito with delicious chewy noodles. A Japanese favorite!

If you’ve been following my reviews for a while, you know that I have a special place in my heart for curries of all stripes. Let’s have a look at this curry udon!

Maruchan Nagomi-an Curry Udon – Japan

#2635: Maruchan Nagomi-an Curry Udon - Japan - The Ramen Rater - zenpop zenpop.jp

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains pork. To prepare, add in all sachets and add 350ml boiling water. Cover and let steep for 5 minutes. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2635: Maruchan Nagomi-an Curry Udon - Japan - The Ramen Rater - zenpop zenpop.jp

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2635: Maruchan Nagomi-an Curry Udon - Japan - The Ramen Rater - zenpop zenpop.jp

The udon block.

#2635: Maruchan Nagomi-an Curry Udon - Japan - The Ramen Rater - zenpop zenpop.jp

Loose pieces of kamaboko, a kind of fish cake.

#2635: Maruchan Nagomi-an Curry Udon - Japan - The Ramen Rater - zenpop zenpop.jp

a large sachet of soup base.

#2635: Maruchan Nagomi-an Curry Udon - Japan - The Ramen Rater - zenpop zenpop.jp

Lots of powder with a curry scent.

#2635: Maruchan Nagomi-an Curry Udon - Japan - The Ramen Rater - zenpop zenpop.jp

A solid ingredient sachet.

#2635: Maruchan Nagomi-an Curry Udon - Japan - The Ramen Rater - zenpop zenpop.jp

Looks to be mostly pork and some other bits.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, egg, kamaboko, barbecue pork, and spring onion. The udon came out nice and plump. Very thick and just what I expected – and enjoyable! The broth is extremely thick and has a salty curry flavor. I could’ve handled a little lighter on the saltiness. The included bits of meat were pretty good and the included kamaboko was about standard as you can get. 3.75 out of 5.0 stars.  JAN bar code 4901990333054.

#2635: Maruchan Nagomi-an Curry Udon - Japan - The Ramen Rater - zenpop zenpop.jp

83gX12 pieces Maru-chan Kazuan and (Nagomi An) c u r r y    u d o n 

A Maruchan TV commercial

#1919: Maruchan Shiroi Chikara Mochi Udon

Here’s another one that was sent to me by Javier over at Box From Japan – thanks! Box From Japan is a subscription service – you can get a box sent to you every month with some great noodles within! This is an interesting one – looks like they’re mentioning a big Dragonball Z contest or something on it. 2.000.000 somethings are referred to… Hmmm… Not only that, this one’s got mochi in it! Mochi is a doughy kind of substance which can surround jellies or ice cream (my favorite). It also apparently goes well in udon! Let’s check it out!

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains fish. To prepare, add everything to the bowl and add boiling water to fill line. Let sit covered for 5 minutes. Stir and enjoy!

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

Detail of the obverse side of the lid (click to enlarge).

The udon block.

A dual sachet of dry ingredients.

The soup base.

Some ito togarashi powder.

The block of mochi.

Bits of tofu and kamaboko amongst other thing from the bowl.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion, hard boiled egg and kamaboko. The noodles are wide and flat and had a nice chew to them, lighter than round fresh udon, but nice nonetheless. The broth has a bonito taste along with soy and was pleasingly robust. The bits of tofu were great and the included kamaboko was very large and hydrated nicely. The mochi was not included in the bowl when I steeped it, so afterwards I added it – not correct. However, I threw the bowl in the microwave and quickly I got the picture – amazing! Gooey and almost cheeselike in execution. Definitely worth a try. 4.5 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4901990522991.

Chikara Mochi Noodle, Instant Udon, Pack of 12

A Japanese Maruchan TV commercial.

#1895: Maruchan Seimen Houjyun Koku Shoyu

Here’s another one that was sent to me by Javier over at Box From Japan – thanks! Box From Japan is a subscription service – you can get a box sent to you every month with some great noodles within! This one looks really fancy – the whole thing is shiny and gold! Let’s have a look inside!

Here’s detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains pork and fish. To prepare, add in vegetable sachet. Add boiling water to fill line and cover for 5 minutes. Add in soup base and stir well. Garnish with nori (seaweed). Enjoy!

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

The noodle block.

The soup base sachet.

Has a sweet pork scent to it.

The vegetable and meat sachet.

Wow – pork and nice big pieces of vegetables.

A sachet of nori.

A nice big piece!

Finished (click to enlarge). Added hard boiled egg. The noodles are absolutely excellent – nice and chewy but not tough. They’re perfectly hydrated and of a good, thick gauge. The broth is really good too – a soy sauce flavor with a little sweetness and a beautiful oiliness. The piece of seaweed is an excellent plus as well as the garnish pack which included pork, bamboo shoot and spring onion of which all were excellent. A beautiful bowl of instant ramen. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.  JAN bar code 4901990334112.

Maruchan-seimen 4-taste Variety Packs (8pacs)

A TV commercial for the Maruchan Seimen bowls. Here’s the ‘making of video as well.

#1613: Maruchan Kaoru Maitake Tempura Udon

Got this one on last year’s birthday trip to Canada. Since my trip is coming very soon this year, I figured it was time. So, what is maitake? Wikipedia had this to say:

Grifola frondosa is a polypore mushroom that grows in clusters at the base of trees, particularly oaks. The mushroom is commonly known among English speakers as hen-of-the-woods, ram’s head and sheep’s head. It is typically found in late summer to early fall. In the United States’ supplement market, as well as in Asian grocery stores, the mushroom is known by its Japanese name maitake (舞茸), which means “dancing mushroom”. Throughout Italian American communities in the northeastern United States, it is commonly known as the signorina mushroom. G. frondosa should not be confused with Laetiporus sulphureus, another edible bracket fungusthat is commonly called chicken of the woods or “sulphur shelf”. The fungus becomes inedible like all polypores when they are older, because it is too tough to eat.

The fungus is native to the northeastern part of Japan and North America, and is prized in traditional Chinese and Japanese herbology as a medicinal mushroom, an aid to balance out altered body systems to a normal level. It is widely eaten in Japan, and its popularity in western cuisine is growing, although the mushroom has been alleged to cause allergic reactions in rare cases.

Well, I hope I’m not allergic to this kind of mushroom – fingers crossed! Let’s have a look at this Japanese bowl.

Here’s the distributor/import sticker (click image to enlarge). Contains fish.

Detail of the side panels (click image to enlarge). To prepare, add in contents of sachet and add 360ml boiling water and cover for 5 minutes and stir. Enjoy!

 Detail of the lid (click image to enlarge).

The noodle block.

The soup base sachet.

Has a somewhat acidic scent.

In the bowl on it’s own was a lot of tempura and some kamaboko fish cake pieces.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added spring onion. The noodles are broad flat udon with a decent consistency and mouthfeel. The broth is a salty soy kind of thing. The tempura was good and indeed contained mushroom. The kamaboko was hydrated well. 3.25 out of 5.0 stars.  JAN bar code 4901990330596.

Maruchan Kaoru Maitake mashroom tempura udon cup 82gx12

A vintage Maruchan TV spot.

#1570: Maruchan Big Cup Ramen Corn, Salt & Butter Flavor

Once in a while, I get something a little different – something that contains something I’ve not seen before. This is one of those times. So it was kind of difficult to translate this one – it’s basically salt Butter and Corn flavor, although the translation I ended up with didn’t mention the corn. I decided to go ahead and add corn in the title anyways. Also, I saw lots of translations mention the word circle, although I’m not sure if that was just Google translate being weird.Anyways, this is a big bowl of noodles and I’m very curious to try them. Without any further adieu, let’s open this thing up and look inside!

Here’s the import/distributor’s sticker (click image to enlarge).

Detail of the side panels (click image to enlarge). I’m guessing this one contains meat and/or fish. To prepare, add vegetables sachet, soup base sachet, and boiling water to fill line and let steep for 3 minutes. Stir and top with contents of smallest sachet and enjoy!

 Detail of the lid (click image to enlarge).

The noodle block.

The soup base sachet.

A lot of powdery seasoning.

A vegetable sachet.

Mostly spring onion.

Dehydrated corn from the bottom of the bowl – a lot of it!

A very small, thick sachet.

Nope – never seen this before. A little dehydrated pat of butter. Not exactly sure if it is butter as I’d think real butter would go bad, but it looks and smells like butter.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added narutomaki and spring onion. The noodles have quite nice feel to them even though they’re not a pack version. They’re comfortable. The broth is a creamy affair with a nice corn flavor to it and corn all over the place (I has thought about adding some more corn, but the sheer amount of corn in this bowl was absolutely wonderful). The butter? Adds a bit of extra creaminess and luxuriance to it. I find it reminiscent of Maruchan USA’s Creamy Chicken ramen, which is one of my favorites. This is very good. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars – a real winner. JAN bar code 4901990330688.

 Here’s another Maruchan product – looks to be a shio flavored yakisoba.

A Marucham Seimen instructional video. Seimen is anothe noodle product – a premium line.

#1521: Maruchan Gotsumori Sauce Yakisoba

Okay, I’m familiar with yakisoba, but what’s Gotsumori sauce all about? After some scouring of the Internet, I didn’t find a whole lot. I found on the manufacturer’s site that the sauce is spicy and also has a sachet of Kewpie karashimayonnaise (kind of a mayo-mustard thing). Anyways, yeah I’m definitely coming up short on this one! Let’s have a look.

An import/distributor sticker (click image to enlarge). Contains egg.

Details from the side and bottom of the package’s outer wrap (click image to enlarge).

Under the wraps – this is the large lid for this tray (click image to enlarge). To prepare, open the lid using tab A to the line B. Remove all sachets. Empty vegetable sachet into the tray. Add boiling water to fill line and re-cover. Let steep for 3 minutes. Remove tab C and drain. Remove the whole lid and add in large sauce sachet. Stir well and top with mayonnaise sachet. Enjoy!

The noodle block.

The sauce sachet.

Has a nice yakisoba scent.

The vegetables sachet.

Cabbage and other bits.

Kewpie mayonnaise!

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added sauteed beef, sweet onion and broccoli with a little kizami shoga on top. The noodles are bouncy and tasty – and plentiful; this is a massive amount of food and could easily be split for two people. The yakisoba sauce doesn’t come across as spicy at all, but has a very nice flavor. The vegetables hydrated exceptionally well – the cabbage was crunchy! The Kewpie mayonnaise has a nice hit of spiciness though – and it works extremely well. Great stuff! 5.0 out of 5.0 stars EAN bar code 4901990324595.

You can get these Gotsumori Yakisoba trays here on Amazon!

I think this is awesome – so it looks like they’ve got a ton of different yakisoba and they’re all trying to tell which is which by taste? Whatever’s going on, it’s pretty awesome. Wish I would’ve been there! I mean, I’ve tried one or two tray yakisobas in my time… Maybe next time?

#1493: Maruchan Magomi-an Kitsune Udon (Eastern Japanese Flavor)

Thanks to Yuji Hashimoto over at Takamori Kosan of Japan for helping me to translate this one! Today’s review is one that I think I found up in Canada. It looks to be similar to Maruchan’s regular Kitsune Udon bowl – the red one.Kitsune means ‘fox’ in Japanese. Here’s a little something about the ‘kitsune myth’ from wikipedia –

Kitsune (?, IPA: [kitsɯne] ( )) is the Japanese word for fox. Foxes are a common subject of Japanese folklore; in English, kitsune refers to them in this context. Stories depict them as intelligent beings and as possessing magical abilities that increase with their age and wisdom. Foremost among these is the ability to assume human form. While some folktales speak of kitsune employing this ability to trick others—as foxes in folklore often do—other stories portray them as faithful guardians, friends, lovers, and wives.

Foxes and human beings lived close together in ancient Japan; this companionship gave rise to legends about the creatures. Kitsune have become closely associated with Inari, a Shinto kami or spirit, and serve as its messengers. This role has reinforced the fox’s supernatural significance. The more tails a kitsune has—they may have as many as nine—the older, wiser, and more powerful it is. Because of their potential power and influence, some people make offerings to them as to a deity.

Let’s have a look.

Detail of the side panels (click image to enlarge). Almost certain it contains fish. To prepare, add contents of sachet and leave fried tofu block inside. Add boiling water to line and re-cover for 5 minutes. Stir and enjoy!

Detail of the lid (click image to enlarge).

The udon block.

A nice big sliced of fried tofu.

The soup base sachet.

Has a fish-based scent.

 Finished (click image to enlarge). Added kamaboko and green onion. The noodles are flat and wide – and thick. They have a light chewiness to them. The broth has a salty and had a soy and bonito flavor. I should also note that the broth was very thin, but that worked very well. The fried tofu was very good – like a slab of meat to tear at every other bite or so. Really makes it seem a fuller meal. 4.25 out of 5.0 stars. The EAN bar code 4901990321228.


This is Maruchan Akai Kitsune Udon, which is very smiliar – get it here!

A TV spot for Maruchan Seimen instant noodles.

#1482: Maruchan ‘I Want To Eat Ramen’ Shoyu Flavor

I think this is the last of these I got when I went up to Canada last year. Shoyu translates to soy sauce, so these are soy sauce flavor ramen noodles. Shoyu is one of the standard flavors of ramen from Japan, such as miso and tonkotsu. Sounds pretty good to me – let’s have a look inside and give ’em a try!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Not sure if it contains meat – I would guess it contains fish. To prepare, add the noodle block to 450ml boiling water and cook for 3 minutes. Put contents of sachet in a bowl. After cooking, pour the water into the bowl as you stir and then the noodles. Enjoy!

The noodle block.

The soup base sachet.

Definitely has a soy sauce scent.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added hard boiled egg, menma (marinated bamboo shoots), sliced green onion, mung bean sprouts, and kamaboko. The noodles have a good gauge and chew to them like a premium standard instant. The broth has a nice soy sauce taste with a nice consistency. Not too strong, not too weak. 4.0 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 4901990510295.


Maruchan makes a lot of different varieties in Japan – this is a Shoyu flavored Seimen – part of a premium line.

I would love to see the Maruchan factory – it looks like so much fun!