Tag Archives: squid

#3219: Kinchan Squid Yakisoba – Japan

#3122: Kinchan Squid Yakisoba - Japan

Here’s another one sent by the company – thank you! I’ve had quite a few squid yakisoba varieties. This one though is by a different brand – all the others were by the same brand, so this should be a bit different. Having trouble thinking of what to say here; just had a hellstorm with a WordPress update and it’s fixed so feeling happy right now. Sorry! Anyways, let’s check it out!

Kinchan Squid Yakisoba – Japan

#3122: Kinchan Squid Yakisoba - Japan

Detail of the bottom and side (click to enlarge). Contains squid. To prepare, add boiling water and dry sachet contents to bowl. Cover for 3 minutes. Drain using spout. Add liquid sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#3122: Kinchan Squid Yakisoba - Japan

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#3122: Kinchan Squid Yakisoba - Japan

The noodle block.

#3122: Kinchan Squid Yakisoba - Japan

A wet sachet.

#3122: Kinchan Squid Yakisoba - Japan

Yakisoba sauce.

#3122: Kinchan Squid Yakisoba - Japan

A dry sachet.

#3122: Kinchan Squid Yakisoba - Japan

Squid and other bits.

#3122: Kinchan Squid Yakisoba - Japan

Finished (click to enlarge). Added squid, soft egg, spring onion, and Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts. The noodles are just perfect in this one – just made to be enjoyed as an instant yakisoba. The sauce is just smackdown lovely. Great yakisoba flavor with garnish full of cabbage and decent sized squid pieces. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.  JAN bar code 4904760013767.

#3122: Kinchan Squid Yakisoba - Japan

Sendan Bowl Poppy Red 7.75″dia.x 2.75″h

Watch me put this together on Instant Noodle Recipe Time!

#3097: Yum Yum Tem Tem Squid With Lime – Thailand

#3097: Yum Yum Tem Tem Squid With Lime - Thailand

Here’s a variety from Yum Yum – really interested in this one since I really like squid. I even have a brand new pack of frozen carved squid to delve into! Let’s squid it up!

Yum Yum Tem Tem Squid With Lime – Thailand

#3097: Yum Yum Tem Tem Squid With Lime - Thailand

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains seafood. To prepare, add boiling water to fill line and cover for 3 minutes. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#3097: Yum Yum Tem Tem Squid With Lime - Thailand

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#3097: Yum Yum Tem Tem Squid With Lime - Thailand

An included fork!

#3097: Yum Yum Tem Tem Squid With Lime - Thailand

The noodle block.

#3097: Yum Yum Tem Tem Squid With Lime - Thailand

Seasoning and bits from the cup.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added squid, Salad Cosmo mung beans sprouts, fried garlic,  and coriander, Light, thin noodles are abundant and have a standard Thai tooth to them. A little firmness and a slight crumble. The broth has a very nice lime aspect to it that works well, and little squid sticks are ubiquitous. 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 8850250009153.

#3097: Yum Yum Tem Tem Squid With Lime - Thailand

Yum Yum Jumbo Instant Noodles Pork 67g. Pack 10

Watch me cook on Instant Noodle Recipe Time!

#2783: Samyang Foods Buldak Bokkeummyun Hot Chicken Flavor Squid

#2783: Samyang Foods Buldak Bokkeummyun Hot Chicken Flavor Squid

What we have here is a squid snack – what’s that you ask? Well, they dehydrate squid somehow and seasoning it. I read once there was a a package of this kind of thing that said ‘chewing gum of Asians. Here’s some background on this from Wikipedia –

Dried shredded squid is a dried, shredded, seasoned, seafood product, made from squid or cuttlefish, commonly found in coastal Asian countries, Russia, and Hawaii. The snack is also referred to as dried shredded cuttlefish.

Historically, squid is common in Pacific coastal regions of East Asia and Southeast Asia. After the packaged form began shipping to English-speaking regions, the Japanese word surume and yóu yú sī in Chinese for this form of seafood was translated as “dried shredded squid” and imprinted on packages. The snack was popularized, sold, and consumed regularly in Hong Kong during the 1970s. Shredded squid began being sold in Macau as an addition to their almond biscuit. In China, it is usually considered to be a light snack, sold in bags in many department stores in major cities. In Japan, dried shredded squid is popularly served as an otsumami (snack consumed while drinking alcohol). In Korean cuisine, dried shredded squid is eaten as anju (food to eat while drinking) and as banchan (small side dishes), such as the dish ojingeochae bokkeum, which is made by stir-frying dried shredded squid seasoned with a mixture of gochujang (chili pepper paste), garlics, and mullyeot (corn syrup-like condiment).[1] In Singapore, it was also popular amongst the older generation when it was sold in a Mama shop. It was marketed as the Chewing gum of the Orientals by the food manufacturing company Ken Ken, during the chewing gum ban in Singapore.[2]

Alright – let’s give it a try!

Samyang Foods Buldak Bokkeummyun Hot Chicken Flavor Squid – South Korea

#2783: Samyang Foods Buldak Bokkeummyun Hot Chicken Flavor Squid

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains squid. To prepare, open the package, pull out a piece and put in your mouth. Finally, chew and enjoy!

#2783: Samyang Foods Buldak Bokkeummyun Hot Chicken Flavor Squid

Here’s a single piece.

#2783: Samyang Foods Buldak Bokkeummyun Hot Chicken Flavor Squid

Finished (click to enlarge). Indeed, this is very chewy. It has a strong and spicy flavor of Samyang Foods Buldak Bokkeummyun. The squid as you chew imparts its own flavor – which is good. Also, although chewy and dehydrated it isn’t overly dry. For a snack I give this 3.75 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 8801073910140.

#2783: Samyang Foods Buldak Bokkeummyun Hot Chicken Flavor Squid

Samyang Spicy Chicken Flavored Dried S q u i d  Seafood Snack / Beer Snack / Buldak / 1pack 40g (Pack of 10)

Here’s how to make seasoned shredded s q u i d snack at home!

#2727: Acecook Ohmori Ika Yakisoba

#2727: Acecook Ohmori Ika Yakisoba

Found this one up in Canada – we’ve been going up there a lot lately and it’s been a nice change of pace. About 2 hours from here to the border and we’ve figured out how to time it for the quickest border crossing by avoiding peak times. LKast time going in it was one car in front of us, leaving was 2 cars in front of it – total wait time was around ten minutes!

Kind of confused with this one – looks like one I got a while back but it’s different; no mayo, no powder. Well, there is powder but it’s more like a kind of togarashi. Anyways, here’s a little about fried noodles from Wikipedia –

Yakisoba (焼きそば?), literally “fried buckwheat,” or sōsu yakisoba (ソース焼きそば?) (the same, but in sauce). It first appeared in food stalls in Japan during the early 20th century.[1] Although soba means buckwheat, typically suggesting noodles made from that flour in mainland Japan, yakisoba noodles are made from wheat flour. It is typically flavored with a condiment similar to oyster sauce.

It is prepared by frying ramen-style noodles with bite-sized pork, vegetables (usually cabbage, onions or carrots) and flavored with yakisoba sauce, salt and pepper. It is served with a multitude of garnishes, such as aonori (seaweed powder), beni shoga (shredded pickled ginger), katsuobushi (fish flakes), and mayonnaise.

Yakisoba is most familiarly served on a plate either as a main dish or a side dish. Another popular way to prepare and serve yakisoba in Japan is to pile the noodles into a bun sliced down the middle in the style of a hot dog, and garnish the top with mayonnaise and shreds of pickled ginger. Called yakisoba-pan, pan meaning bread, it is commonly available at local festivals or konbini (convenience stores).

Sometimes, Japanese white Udon is used as a replacement of Chinese style Soba and called Yakiudon. This variation was started in Kitakyushu or Kokura in Fukuoka Prefecture.

In Okinawa, Yakisoba is popular with Okinawans and U.S. service members stationed on the island alike. After the 1945 hostilities ended on Okinawa, the US military command supplied American food products to the malnourished residents. The preferred Okinawan Yakisoba was prepared from spaghetti, spam, ketchup, any available vegetable (usually canned), and mayonnaise for frying. Mess halls and other on-base eateries often serve yakisoba. Chopped hotdogs are a popular addition to yakisoba made on Okinawa, in addition to other meats such as ham, chicken, and pork.

Alright – let’s check out this squid tray right now!

Acecook Ohmori Ika Yakisoba – Japan

#2727: Acecook Ohmori Ika Yakisoba

Import/distributor sticker (click to enlarge).

#2727: Acecook Ohmori Ika Yakisoba

Detail of the plastic outer wrap (click to enlarge). Contains seafood. To prepare, add the vegetable sachet and boiling water to fill line. Cover for 3 minutes. Use supplied drain spout to drain. Add in remaining sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2727: Acecook Ohmori Ika Yakisoba

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2727: Acecook Ohmori Ika Yakisoba

The noodle block.

#2727: Acecook Ohmori Ika Yakisoba

The liquid base.

#2727: Acecook Ohmori Ika Yakisoba

Yakisoba sauce.

#2727: Acecook Ohmori Ika Yakisoba

The vegetables and seafood sachet.

#2727: Acecook Ohmori Ika Yakisoba

Lots of stuff in here!

#2727: Acecook Ohmori Ika Yakisoba

A smaller sachet.

#2727: Acecook Ohmori Ika Yakisoba

Some kind of garnish togarashi?

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion and some extra squid. The noodles were extremely plentiful. This is a big amount of yakisoba! The taste was like a slightly sweeter than normal yakisoba augmented by bits of squid. It worked pretty well. Bit of cabbage added to the scene very well. 3.75 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4901071207182.

#2727: Acecook Ohmori Ika Yakisoba

A c e c o o k  Ika Big Noodle, Instant Source Yakisoba with Squid, Pack of 12

An TV spot from this company

#2542: Acecook Super Cup Yochan Ika Yakisoba

#2542: Acecook Super Cup Yochan Ika Yakisoba - Japan - squid - The Ramen Rater

My wife and I have been trying out something new. We trade cooking for the week. I make all the dinners one week, she the next. It’s actually been a lot of fun – some positives (I have learned how to make some pretty awesome yakisoba in the kitchen) and some fails (red curry slow cooked in a crock pot really isn’t the way to go when the beef  released a thick sheen of greasy fat). Nothing better than to make something your significant other really enjoys!

I’ve been asked in the past if I’m a chef which makes me laugh. I make instant noodles and add garnish to them – That definitely doesn’t vault me into the world of top chef, rather into the world of being resourceful and finding where to find logical ingredients for garnish and knowing how to prepare them. I just know what I like – that’s where the stars come in. Anyways, this looks to be a squid yakisoba – here’s a little about yakisoba from Wikipedia –

Yakisoba (焼きそば?), literally “fried buckwheat,” or sōsu yakisoba (ソース焼きそば?) (the same, but in sauce). It first appeared in food stalls in Japan during the early 20th century.[1] Although soba means buckwheat, typically suggesting noodles made from that flour in mainland Japan, yakisoba noodles are made from wheat flour. It is typically flavored with a condiment similar to oyster sauce.

It is prepared by frying ramen-style noodles with bite-sized pork, vegetables (usually cabbage, onions or carrots) and flavored with yakisoba sauce, salt and pepper. It is served with a multitude of garnishes, such as aonori (seaweed powder), beni shoga (shredded pickled ginger), katsuobushi (fish flakes), and mayonnaise.

Yakisoba is most familiarly served on a plate either as a main dish or a side dish. Another popular way to prepare and serve yakisoba in Japan is to pile the noodles into a bun sliced down the middle in the style of a hot dog, and garnish the top with mayonnaise and shreds of pickled ginger. Called yakisoba-pan, pan meaning bread, it is commonly available at local festivals or konbini (convenience stores).

Sometimes, Japanese white Udon is used as a replacement of Chinese style Soba and called Yakiudon. This variation was started in Kitakyushu or Kokura in Fukuoka Prefecture.

In Okinawa, Yakisoba is popular with Okinawans and U.S. service members stationed on the island alike. After the 1945 hostilities ended on Okinawa, the US military command supplied American food products to the malnourished residents. The preferred Okinawan Yakisoba was prepared from spaghetti, spam, ketchup, any available vegetable (usually canned), and mayonnaise for frying. Mess halls and other on-base eateries often serve yakisoba. Chopped hotdogs are a popular addition to yakisoba made on Okinawa, in addition to other meats such as ham, chicken, and pork.

Had no idea about the hot dogs! Interesting! I should mention – yes, I know this isn’t a cup, but from everything I’ve read, this range is called Super Cup. Alright – let’s have a look at this Acecook Super Cup yakisoba.

Acecook Super Cup Yochan Ika Yakisoba – Japan

#2542: Acecook Super Cup Yochan Ika Yakisoba - Japan - squid - The Ramen Rater

The distributor/import sticker (click to enlarge).

#2542: Acecook Super Cup Yochan Ika Yakisoba - Japan - squid - The Ramen Rater

Detail of the underside of the outer plastic wrap (click to enlarge). To prepare, peel back tab A to line B. Add contents of garnish sachet and boiling water to fill line. Cover for 3 minutes. Peel off tab C to expose drain spout and drain off water. Remove lid completely and add dry and liquid base sachets. Stir and enjoy!

#2542: Acecook Super Cup Yochan Ika Yakisoba - Japan - squid - The Ramen Rater

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2542: Acecook Super Cup Yochan Ika Yakisoba - Japan - squid - The Ramen Rater

The noodle block.

#2542: Acecook Super Cup Yochan Ika Yakisoba - Japan - squid - The Ramen Rater

A dry base sachet.

#2542: Acecook Super Cup Yochan Ika Yakisoba - Japan - squid - The Ramen Rater

Has a sweet scent.

#2542: Acecook Super Cup Yochan Ika Yakisoba - Japan - squid - The Ramen Rater

A liquid base sachet.

#2542: Acecook Super Cup Yochan Ika Yakisoba - Japan - squid - The Ramen Rater

A very dark liquid.

#2542: Acecook Super Cup Yochan Ika Yakisoba - Japan - squid - The Ramen Rater

The garnish sachet.

#2542: Acecook Super Cup Yochan Ika Yakisoba - Japan - squid - The Ramen Rater

Guessing some of this is squid.

 

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, shichimi togarashi, spring onion and Kewpie mayo. The noodles are good – and very plentiful. However, the flavor is like a very acrid punch with a kind of yakisoba sauce back to it and it just doesn’t make me very enthusiastic about eating. The included garnish hydrated well and I did enjoy the bit of squid. Unfortunately, I’m experiencing disappointment. 1.5 out of 5.0 stars.  JAN bar code 4901071207342.

#2542: Acecook Super Cup Yochan Ika Yakisoba - Japan - squid - The Ramen Rater

Acecook Ika Big Noodle, Instant Source Yakisoba with Squid, Pack of 12

An Acecook TV spot

#1780: Pulmuone Non-Fried Noodle Blackbean Sauce Noodle With Squid

It’s been almost 400 reviews since the last Pulmuone product I’ve reviewed. Found this one at a local South Korean grocery store and thought today would be a good day to try it. Seems like I’m finding less South Korean varieties to review as of late which really bums me out – Always been a big fan of South Korean instant ramyun. Well, this one is from Pulmuone, a company which shoots for the healthier mark with their products. The noodle aren’t fried, so I’m guessing they’re baked or air-dried. Let’s have a look at this one – with squid!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Contains squid and shrimp. To prepare, add noodles and vegetables sachet to 20 oz boiling water and cook for 5 minutes. Drain, saving 2 oz water. Add in contents of sachets and stir. Heat an extra 10 seconds. Stir and enjoy!

The noodle block.

The main seasoning sachet.

A black bean sauce base.

The vegetables sachet.

Vegetables and squid.

A seasoned oil sachet.

Has a nice scent.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added carved squid, mung bean sprouts and spring onion. The noodles are thick and have a nice chew to them. Good thick ramyun gauge. The jjajang flavor is quite good – with the oil is coats everything. The extra 10 seconds at the end makes everything a little more cohesive. The supplied vegetable and squid came out very nicely. 4.5 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 8801114126295.

Non-fried Ramyun Noodle 3.7 Oz Each – Pack of 8 (Black Bean Sauce)

A recent Pulmuone PR film.

Re-Review: Meet The Manufacturer: Nongshim Champong Ramyun Instant Noodle Soup

This is a re-review – the last time I had this was probably in 2003 – when it was review #21. For some reason, I thought that it (Neoguri as well) had octopus in it. Clearly, that’s a squid holding chopstick and wearing clothing. I should note that these days, I know that’s a squid – and that squids don’t wear clothing. Moving on…

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge).

The noodle block.

Powder seasoning packet.

Spicy, red and hot!

The veggie and seafood packet.

Says the seafood component involved mussel flakes and fish cake.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added some onion, odeng, an egg, some processed cheese, some splashes of Tabasco Buffalo Style hot sauce and a little bit of Ajishima Kimchi Furikake. The noodles are nice and wide – they sucked up the broth very nicely and are slightly chewier than the last few Nongshim varieties I’ve had. The broth is great – very very spicy and has a kind of seafood tomato soup kind of sense to it. Very good! The veggies / fish components aren’t bad – all in all a great pack of noodles! 4.0 out of 5.0 stars! UPC bar code 8801043157759 .

Champong TV commercial.

Another Champong commercial

#594: Haioreum Asian Style Noodles Seafood Flavored In Bowl

Thought I’d go with something different tonight – and this definitely qualifies as that I think. Let’s rip the lid off this big fresh udon noodle bowl!

Here are the direction and ingredient panels. Click image to enlarge.

So on the left a seafood block – these are really neat as you’ll see in a minute! On the right, a packet of liquid – with a deep red color.

Here’s the fresh noodle packet – lots of the stuff!

Here’s the block waiting to be dropped in the noodle bowl.

So here it is now in the soup! It sucks up liquid quickly and once stirred it disintegrates into the ingredients – it’s quite amazing!

Click image to enlarge. Here’s the finished product. Wow – so the noodles are thick and chewy and pretty good! The broth is spicy and has a very seafoody flavor. The seafood blcok? Well I’ll say it’s probably the most awesome thing in the world – lots of bits of veggies and – ready? SQUID! Chewy squidbits! Not badf at all. Pretty rad bowl but not something I’d have again probably. 3.5 out of 5.0 stars.

If you haven’t tried Korean BBQ, I recommend making it a New Year’s resolution to try it – it’s amazing.