Tag Archives: noodle king

#2466: Sau Tao Instant Noodle King Pepper Duck Soup Flavour

#2466: Sau Tao Instant Noodle King Pepper Duck Soup Flavour - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

This pepper duck variety was sent by Colin from Massachusetts – thanks again! It really took me a long time to warm up to duck. I think honestly the reason being was the fact that I never had the real thing until I went to Asia. Indeed, I’ve had duck in Malaysia, Thailand and Taiwan and it’s definitely been a highlight of those trips. It’s got a strong flavor which is definitely one a lot of people might not be familiar with (like myself in the past). I would say that the best term for it is rich.

Here’s a little snippet about a particular kind of duck from Wikipedia –

The duck is first marinates for several hours with a rub containing a typical combination of whole or crushed Sichuan pepper, huangjiu or baijiu (fermented or distilled Chinese wine), ginger, garlic, and salt, with much of it rubbed inside the cavity of the duck. For intensity of taste, sometimes the marinade rub has choujiu, black pepper, tea leaves, and camphor leaves. Following the marination, the duck is quickly blanched in hot water to tighten the skin, and then towel and air dried. This step ensures that the skin of the duck has a crisp texture upon completion. A wok is then prepare for smoking the duck with black tea leaves and camphor twigs and leaves. Following a smoke treatment of approximately 10–15 minutes, the duck is then steamed for another 10 minutes before being deep fried in vegetable oil until its skin is crisp.[2]

The duck is consumed wrapped in clam-shaped buns called Gua bao (割包).

So when I ate duck in Taiwan, they bring it out on a cart and carve it while a waitress gives a short speech about how amazing it is. Duck seems to be for special and auspicious occasions! Let’s give this pepper duck flavor a try.

Sau Tao Instant Noodle King Pepper Duck Soup Flavour – Hong Kong

.#2466: Sau Tao Instant Noodle King Pepper Duck Soup Flavour - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains fish and crustacea. To prepare, add noodle block to 600ml boiling water and cook for 90 seconds. Take off heat and add in sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2466: Sau Tao Instant Noodle King Pepper Duck Soup Flavour - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The noodle block.

#2466: Sau Tao Instant Noodle King Pepper Duck Soup Flavour - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

A dry base sachet.

#2466: Sau Tao Instant Noodle King Pepper Duck Soup Flavour - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

A powder with flecks of vegetable.

#2466: Sau Tao Instant Noodle King Pepper Duck Soup Flavour - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The liquid base sachet.

#2466: Sau Tao Instant Noodle King Pepper Duck Soup Flavour - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Thick and oily.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion, sesame chilli oil and Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts. The noodles have that nice chewy Hong Kong style to them, kind of like wonton noodles. The broth has a nice taste and just screams for duck. I mean, it begs for duck. So much so that I swear a flock of them that live in the swimming pool here started waddling this way to hop in the bowl. Authentic and tasty. 4.0 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 087303862740.

#2466: Sau Tao Instant Noodle King Pepper Duck Soup Flavour - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The Taste of Old Hong Kong: Recipes and Memories From 30 Years on the China Coast

Why can’t we have store openings like this here in the USA? Looks like a lot of fun!

#2357: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Wonton Soup Flavoured

#2357: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Wonton Soup Flavoured - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - wanton mee - instant noodles

Got this bowl quite a while back – I’ve got lots of new varieties and still trying to clear out the ones that are close to expiration! So let’s ask Wikipedia about wonton noodles –

Wonton noodles (pinyin: Yúntūn miàn; Cantonese Yale: wàhn tān mihn, sometimes called wanton mee (“wanton” is a Cantonese word for dumpling while noodles in Hokkien is “mee” or in Cantonese, “min”) is a Cantonese noodle dish which is popular in Guangzhou, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand. The dish is usually served in a hot broth, garnished with leafy vegetables, and wonton dumplings. The types of leafy vegetables are usually kai-lan also known as Chinese kale. Another type of dumpling known as shui jiao is sometimes in place of wonton. It contains prawns, chicken or pork, spring onions with some chefs adding mushroom and black fungus.

In Hong Kong and Guangzhou, wonton noodles are usually in steaming hot soup with shrimp wontons and with leafy vegetables.[1] There are plenty of variations of this popular Cantonese dish, with different toppings and garnishes. For example, the soup and wontons in a separate bowl, the noodles being served relatively dry, with the toppings and garnishes, dressed with sauce, dipping the noodles in the soup to eat it.

There are four distinct features: First, the wontons are predominantly prawn, with small amounts of minced pork, or no pork at all. Second, aficionados will insist on fresh, smooth thin noodles which are al dente, free from the taste and odor which is characteristic in many egg noodles when cooked. Third, the bouillon is light brown (prepared from dried flounder) and is usually steaming hot. Lastly, garlic chives are used as a garnish. The first two give the dish a wet but crunchy or crispy mouthfeel. The last two give the dish a unique bouquet.

In order to ensure that the noodles are perfectly al dente and free from “noodley” taste, the cooking process and sequence must be meticulously adhered to. The wonton is cooked first, and then placed in the bowl. The noodles are blanched for only 10 seconds, after which they are rinsed under cold water and placed in the serving bowl. Piping hot bouillon is then scooped into the bowl, on top of the wonton noodles. The bouillon must be tasty, yet not so strong as to overpower the delicate taste of the wonton and the noodles which it is meant to accompany.[2]

When served, the spoon must be placed at the bottom, with the wontons above the spoon and the noodles on top. Because if the noodles soak in the soup for too long then it will be over cooked, this is strictly adhered to by the best wonton noodle establishments.

Although the “wonton noodle” is synonymous with wonton and noodles in piping hot bouillon, the dish may also be “dry”, as in lo mein (撈麵), where the wonton are on a large bed of noodles.

Let’s give this wonton noodle variety from Hong Kong a look.

Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Wonton Soup Flavoured – Hong Kong

#2357: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Wonton Soup Flavoured - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - wanton mee - instant noodles

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains fish. To prepare, add boiling water to fill line as well as all the sachets. Let steep covered for 3-4 minutes. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2357: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Wonton Soup Flavoured - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - wanton mee - instant noodles

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2357: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Wonton Soup Flavoured - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - wanton mee - instant noodles

An included fork!

#2357: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Wonton Soup Flavoured - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - wanton mee - instant noodles

The noodle block.

#2357: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Wonton Soup Flavoured - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - wanton mee - instant noodles

The dry soup base sachet.

#2357: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Wonton Soup Flavoured - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - wanton mee - instant noodles

A light colored powder with flecks of herbs.

#2357: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Wonton Soup Flavoured - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - wanton mee - instant noodles

The vegetables sachet.

#2357: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Wonton Soup Flavoured - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - wanton mee - instant noodles

A colorful mixture.

#2357: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Wonton Soup Flavoured - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - wanton mee - instant noodles

An oil sachet.

#2357: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Wonton Soup Flavoured - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - wanton mee - instant noodles

A yellow oil.

#2357: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Wonton Soup Flavoured - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - wanton mee - instant noodles

Finished (click to enlarge). Added fish ball and spring onion. So the noodles are very chewy with a very unique crumble. Indeed, they are very hearty and good. The broth has a very nice taste and body – good oiliness and a perfect compliment for the noodle. Finally, the vegetables included were mostly corn and seaweed which hydrated to perfection. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 6920363400696.

#2357: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Wonton Soup Flavoured - Hong Kong - The Ramen Rater - wanton mee - instant noodles

The Hong Kong cookbook;: A new kind of authentic Chinese cookery adapted to the American kitchen,

A walk around a Hong Kong street market.

#2286: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Abalone And Chicken Soup Flavoured

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I haven’t generally been a fan of abalone and chicken instant noodles. I’m crossing my fingers here though. Let’s give it a try!

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add in sachet contents and fill to line with boiling water. Cover for 3-4 minutes. Stir and enjoy!

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

An included fork!

The noodle block.

The powder base.

A light powder.

A sauce sachet.

Tick and oily.

The vegetables sachet.

2016_11_4_2286_011

Lots of bits in there.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, Dodo fishball and spring onion. The noodles are really good in this one – nice gauge and the chew – very sturdy and hearty. The broth is definitely leaning more towards chicken than abalone, something I enjoyed. The flavor was rich and the oiliness was very good.  The vegetables hydrated well and worked nicely here. 4.25 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 6920363400702.

The Hong Kong cookbook;: A new kind of authentic Chinese cookery adapted to the American kitchen,

A walk around a Hong Kong street market.

#2032: Kamfen Noodle King Artificial Beef Soup Flavored

A couple of months ago, I experienced an instant noodle drought. I was looking in my hampers and there were maybe 10 varieties left! We hit 99 Ranch and I found about 10 or so varieties to review (later after putting a call out on the site, I ended up with people sending all sorts of varieties and now my hampers runneth over – my thanks!). Here’s one I found at 99 Ranch – let’s check it out.

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add in all sachet contents and fill to line with boiling water. Let stand covered for 3-4 minutes. Stir and enjoy!

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

The noodle block.

A powder soup base sachet.

Smells beefy!

A paste sachet.

An oily concoction.

The vegetables sachet.

A nice selection.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added coriander, beef, sweet onion and crushed red pepper. The noodles are more easily enjoyed with a couple of crosscuts with a pair of kitchen scissors as the are particularly long. They have a a very dense nature and robust chewiness. The broth indeed has a beef flavor but isn’t extremely strong. The included vegetables hydrated quite nicely – especially the corn which was nice and sweet. 3.75 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 6920363400689.

Instant Noodle Wonton (Beef Flavor) – 82g

A short film about Shenzhen, China – the city where these noodles are produced.

#428: Kamfen E-Men Noodles Artificial Chicken Soup Flavor

So this is something different – E-Men noodles. The ingredients say they’re mad of wheat flour and soybean oil…

Comes with only one packet. This is one large noodle block though and won’t fit in a normal pot. You’ll need something a little bigger to accommodate this thing…

Here’s the soup base.

Click image to enlarge. Here’s the final product. The directions on the back were a little off… They said to add the noodles to the water, but neglected to mention how much of ‘the water’ you need. At the end it said the noodles are ready to be served, but not sure if that’s with broth or not. So I winged it. I added a little boiling water and pulled out the noodles and stirred in the bowl. Some tasty stuff! Thick noodles. The chicken flavor is good. Wide and heavy are the noodles. I’m going with a 3.75 out of 5.0. The noodles were pretty good and the soup tasted chickenny.

#402: Sau Tao (Thick) Instant Noodle King Scallop Soup Flavor

I think this is the last of the Sau Tao’s I have for reviewing at this point. This one’s Scallop flavor with thick noodles. Again, these noodles aren’t fried. If you notice to the upper right of center, you are being informed that ‘Health is important.’ Looks like 4g fat and 7.5g fiber – not too bad actually.

So here we go with the packets. I really enjoy the look of the powder packet – the one at the far left. It’s got that old Asian product look that really draws me to the noodles in the first place. Next is a clear packet of seasoned oil. This packet might often be cloudy because the temperature would be cooler. The last is the veggies and other stuff packet, a good sized one.

An interesting melange of colors going on here… Those noodles are real weird looking are they not?

Click image to enlarge. As is my constant behoove, I added one fried egg. I see fried eggs in all sorts of instant noodles from every part of Asia. Breaking a soft yolk really makes the broth more accommodating and relaxing to the palate, like a fleece blanket. The noodles, healthy as they are, are kind of lacking. I think frying them gives an extra bit of flavor and texture that these don’t have. The broth was extremely thin, and I would recommend using a little less water than the directions call for – maybe just fill it a tad below the line. The winner here were the veggies. They re hydrated nicely and were delicious. It all came together decently, but wasn’t anything really exceptional. 3.0 out of 5.0 stars.

NOTE: This one did come with a fork but I’ve done a Sau Tao fork update already.

It didn’t make me deflate.

When I grew up, I lived very close to the Canadian border, so I saw a lot of Canadian kids’ shows. Here’s a few…

#376: Sau Tao Lobster Soup Flavored Thick Instant Noodle King

So here’s another of these Sau Tao’s by Sun Shun Fuk (heh heh) and hopefully it’s some good stuff.

A fork, then from left seasoning powder, seasoned oil and vegetables.

Hey this looks pretty good. Look at the noodles – interesting!

Click image to enlarge. Okay so looking at the ingredients, I’m seeing that these aren’t as bad for you as some others. For example, the whole bowl has 4.3g fat, 15g protein and 7g fiber. Not too bad at all right? Well, there’s a trade off here and that’s flavor. The noodles are really funky – the beef Sau Tao I reviewed recently (#364: Sun Shun Fuk Sau Tao Beef Soup Flavored Hong Kong Style Instant Noodle King) these are the same noodles except broad. The flavor is weird too; while it smells of a buttery seafood aroma, its kind of bland. The soup is greasy; I guess all the fat is in the broth? The veggies were nice though.  2.75 out of 5.0 stars.