Tag Archives: coriander

#2847: Nissin Spice Kitchen Phakchist Curry Pho Soup

hobby link japan hlj.com #2847: Nissin Spice Kitchen Phakchist Curry Pho Soup

Hey look at this! This came by way of Hobby Link Japan, a great site that has all sorts of amazing Japanese things including instant noodles! Thank you very much! Here’s what they had to say about this unique variety on their website –

Whether you call it pakuchi, coriander or cilantro, the aromatic herb has tons of fans worldwide (sometimes referred to as “phakchists”), and this super-spicy curry soup is packed with 10 different spices and plenty of pakuchi, as well as delicate rice-flour noodles!  Just add hot water, cover and steep for 3 minutes, then stir and enjoy your taste adventure!

Phakchists eh? Hey that’s pretty cool – another tidsbit of info to add to my head! Let’s check it out!

Nissin Spice Kitchen Phakchist Curry Pho Soup – Japan

hobby link japan hlj.com #2847: Nissin Spice Kitchen Phakchist Curry Pho Soup

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Unsure, but probably contains por.k To prepare, add boiling water and dry sachet. Let steep covered with liquid sachet on lid for 3 minutes. Add in liquid base sachet. Finally, stir and enjoy!

hobby link japan hlj.com #2847: Nissin Spice Kitchen Phakchist Curry Pho Soup

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge). Looks like there are three different kinds.

hobby link japan hlj.com #2847: Nissin Spice Kitchen Phakchist Curry Pho Soup

The noodle block.

hobby link japan hlj.com #2847: Nissin Spice Kitchen Phakchist Curry Pho Soup

The liquid base sachet.

hobby link japan hlj.com #2847: Nissin Spice Kitchen Phakchist Curry Pho Soup

A cloudy deep liquid.

hobby link japan hlj.com #2847: Nissin Spice Kitchen Phakchist Curry Pho Soup

The dry sachet.

hobby link japan hlj.com #2847: Nissin Spice Kitchen Phakchist Curry Pho Soup

Coriander!

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts and a little coriander of my own. The noodles were are little on the tough side even after the 3 minutes allotted. However the broth more than made up for that with a rich and tasty curry. As far as being spicy, it was spicy but very mellow heat-level. 3.5 out of 5.0 stars.  JAN bar code 4902105064351.

Spice Kitchen Phakchist Curry Pho Soup

Well, this looks like a meal I would enjoy!

#2686: Sapporo Ichiban Coriander & Chicken Noodle

#2686: Sapporo Ichiban Coriander & Chicken Noodle

Once you get outside the United States, cilantro is known as coriander. This is actually the second coriander variety I’ll be trying from Japan. Didn’t expect that to be a popular flavor for Japan, but hey, why not. I really like coriander. This one comes from Zenpop.jp. They have monthly ramen boxes that are a really great deal – definitely, check them out! Okay – let’s crack this one open.

Sapporo Ichiban Coriander & Chicken Noodle – Japan

#2686: Sapporo Ichiban Coriander & Chicken Noodle

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains chicken. To prepare, add boiling water to fill love and cover for 3 minutes. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2686: Sapporo Ichiban Coriander & Chicken Noodle

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2686: Sapporo Ichiban Coriander & Chicken Noodle

The noodle block.

#2686: Sapporo Ichiban Coriander & Chicken Noodle

Loose garnish and seasoning from the cup.

Finished (click to enlarge). The noodles came out quite nicely – gauge and chew are on point in this cup. The broth has a very nice chicken and coriander taste to it – really enjoyable and rich. The bits of cabbage, coriander, and chicken round out the scene. 4.25 out of 5.0 stars.  JAN bar code 4901734031468.

#2686: Sapporo Ichiban Coriander & Chicken Noodle

Sapporo Ichiban Pokemon Noodle Soy Sauce 38g from Japan

Did you know that Sapporo Ichiban Shio is actually the image of noodles behind The Ramen Rater logo?

#2574: Acecook Spice Deli Tantan Men With Cilantro

#2574: Acecook Spice Deli Tantan Men With Cilantro - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - cup - zenpop

Here’s one I got from ZenPop, a company that’s producing ramen boxes in Japan. They have a new box every month with 9 different varieties for $29.50 – a pretty impressive deal as they include the shipping in the price.

Here’s how they describe this variety: ‘This miso based soup is spiced up with cilantro. It’s hot and spicy, but is absolutely savory! Don’t forget to keep a towel and a cup of water at hand. You’ll be dripping in sweat and get thirsty!’

Alrighty them – let’s give this a look!

Acecook Spice Deli Tantan Men With Cilantro – Japan

#2574: Acecook Spice Deli Tantan Men With Cilantro - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - cup - zenpop

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains pork and chicken. To prepare, add 440ml boiling water to fill line. Let steep covered for 3 minutes. Stir. Finally, add oil sachet and dry sachet and enjoy!

#2574: Acecook Spice Deli Tantan Men With Cilantro - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - cup - zenpop

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2574: Acecook Spice Deli Tantan Men With Cilantro - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - cup - zenpop

The noodle block.

#2574: Acecook Spice Deli Tantan Men With Cilantro - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - cup - zenpop

Loose bits and seasoning from the cup.

#2574: Acecook Spice Deli Tantan Men With Cilantro - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - cup - zenpop

A dry sachet.

#2574: Acecook Spice Deli Tantan Men With Cilantro - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - cup - zenpop

Looks like cilantro and chilli powder.

#2574: Acecook Spice Deli Tantan Men With Cilantro - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - cup - zenpop

The oil sachet, which is affixed to the lid.

#2574: Acecook Spice Deli Tantan Men With Cilantro - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - cup - zenpop

A deep colored oil.

Finished (click to enlarge). Noodles were of a standard gauge although straighter than most if that makes sense. The broth was really interesting. Juxtaposed with a strong cilantro (coriander) flavor throughout was this spiciness – Sichuan pepper. It really was the last thing I would have expected from a Japanese instant noodle yet there it was. Very curious and interesting – they just keep coming up with more and more new flavors. 4.0 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4901071239251.

#2574: Acecook Spice Deli Tantan Men With Cilantro - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - cup - zenpop

Acecook noodle vermicelli Tanita cafeteria supervision ‘S’S noodles flavor 41gX6 pieces

An Acecook TV commercial

#2245: Nissin Vietnamese Chicken Coriander Flavour Vermicelli

If you follow my daily reviews, you might have noticed not just a lot, but a lot a lot of Nissin reviews lately. This is because I’ve done a few Meet The Manufacturers and they were kind enough to send more varieties than I review in a Meet The Manufacturer (15 maximum). Nissin Hong Kong sent around 50 different product varieties! That’s what we have today. Let’s check out this chicken flavor vermicelli!

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains chicken. To prepare, add in sachet contents and add boiling water to fill line. Let steep covered for 3 minutes. Stir and enjoy!

The noodle block.

The dry base sachet.

A light powder.

A liqdui sachet.

Has a nice scent of sesame and coriander.

The vegetables sachet.

Vegetables and dehydrated chicken.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added sous vide chicken (147 degrees for 135 minutes), hard boiled egg, Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts and coriander. The vermicelli was a little on the tough side – aside from that, nice gauge. The broth had a chicken and coriander kind of taste for sure. The bits included coriander and other vegetable bits as well as what seemed to me like chicken sausage. 3.5 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 4897878170029.

Vermicelli soup 21g ~ 6 pieces of Nisshin also Chit wonton

A Nissin Hong Kong TV commercial for their tonkotsu line of Demae Ramen.

Product Samples From Nyor Nyar Of Malaysia!

Okay so I live in a small town in between a lot of bigger ones called Kenmore. We get a LOT of power outages here, and it looks like we’re probably going to have one tonight! Remnants of typhoon Songda shot out of the south pacific and made a beeline right for western Washington state. This neat box of samples arrived about an hour ago – I asked for more of these since I really like them a lot and they were kind enough to send some! Let’s crack this box open!

The inner box!

48 packs! (click to enlarge)

They’re super good (click to enlarge)

I decided before the power goes out I ought to make some (click to enlarge). I added chinese sausdage, mung bean sprouts, fishballs, tau pok, coriander and chilli flake. Thank you – can’t wait to share these with friends!

Meet The Manufacturer: #2184: President Rice Coriander Instant Rice Noodles

As we wind down this Meet The Manufacturer, I’ve been saving one that I found very interesting to be towards the end. I use coriander in the ‘finished’ photo of many instant noodle varieties – but never have I seen an instant noodles whose primary flavor is coriander. I’m very curious about this one – let’s check it out!

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add all seasoning sachets to the bowl and boiling water to fill line. Let steep covered for 4 minutes. Stir and enjoy!

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

The noodles.

The soup base sachet.

A very light powder.

The garnish sachet.

Coriander!

An oil sachet.

Has a bright yellowish hue.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts and coriander. The noodles hydrated very well. They are wide and flat and have a decent chew to them but not overly chewy for a rice noodle. The broth is a kind of salty and chicken like one, augmented by a nice oiliness. The sachet of dried coriander can be seen flecked throughout here. To be honest, I expected this to be an onslaught of coriander flavor, but it was a little drowned out so to speak by the broth’s saltiness. I think it could be served better with more coriander and less saltiness. Still, it was a tasty bowl of rice noodles. 2.75 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 8851876001491.

Thailand: The Cookbook

A short and beautiful on harvesting and transporting coriander in northern Thailand.

The Ramen Rater’s Top Ten Instant Noodle Add-Ons Of All Time 2015 Edition

In the last few years, I’ve seen a large amount of articles with titles like ‘Best Ramen Hacks,’ ‘Pimp Your Ramen’ and so on. These titles fall under the category of clickbait – using hipster terminology and such to entice one to click on them. Usually, they’re all things people know about already; vegetables, oils and such. This is a list of my favorite add-ons and garnishes. While some may be familiar to you, others may not be. It’s also geared to help you navigate the Asian Grocery, a place many find to be alien to them but I have found to be one of the most vibrant and wonderful places I visit very regularly. Finally, I also included some tips of storage and how long these products last for those on a tight budget. In no particular order, here’s this new list!

Chinese Sausage

Often found on end caps, either refrigerated or on the shelf. Chinese sausage pairs quite well with spicy, beef, pork, spicy beef and spicy pork varieties from China and Taiwan. They sausage is wrinkly on the outside kind of like a beef stick and has a sweet taste. I freeze these (they’ll last a long time without freezer burn) and then take out a link and slice in thin pieces. They’re easy to slice when frozen. Toss in at any point while cooking the noodles and they’ll add a little protein and a little oiliness to the broth.

Tofu Puff / Tau Pok

These can be found not surprisingly with the myriad of tofu varieties. They’re like little spongy cubes of delight! Just take one out and cut in half (I use kitchen scissors) and drop in your instant noodles. I like them primarily with curries. They often will have 2 weeks on them in the refrigerator – I’ve never frozen them and guess that wouldn’t work very well.

Mung Bean Sprouts

Mung bean sprouts should be pretty easy to get anywhere. I prefer a brand called Salad Cosmo; they seem to stay fresh a lot longer. Mung bean sprouts are very perishable, so get them in the refrigerator as soon as you get home from the store. They have a very short life – maybe 3-5 days refrigerated. They add a nice crunch to any instant noodles.

Fish Cake

There are tons of different kinds of fish cake out there – kamaboko (looks like a little loaf on a piece of wood), narutomaki (a tube with a swirl pattern), and Busan fish cake (a fried South Korean delicacy). Fishcake usually is comprised of processed fish that is steamed or fried. Prep them by slicing thin and put a few pieces in a ziploc and put in the freezer. They tend to stick to eachother, so using multiple ziplocs works best. They’ll stay in good condition frozen for quite a long time. Of course, these work very well with seafood varieties, both Japanese and South Korea, and also in traditional Japanese varieties like shoyu and miso. They’re either refrigerated or frozen at the store.

Cilantro / Coriander

This leafy green is known either by cilantro or coriander. It adds a nice savory flavor to instant noodles when dropped on top as a garnish. The trick with picking coriander is looking at the leaves. If they look saggy or wilted, skip ’em. If you see one lone bunch sitting where many should be, it’s probably going to go bad really quick as well. What I do is get a nice looking bunch and bring it home, give it a rinse under cold water, pat dry with paper towl and put in a loose plastic produce bag (grab an extra while shopping) in the crisper in our refrigerator. If your refrigerator runs a little on the cold side, they’ll go bad quicker, but since a bunch usually is under a dollar, just go and get more. Under perfect conditions, they should last 3-4 days.

Korean BBQ Meat

If you want to add beef or pork to your instant noodles and you’re on a budget, this is going to save you a ton of money. Go to where they have the packaged meats. Chances are you’ll find a ton of different cuts of pork and beef – and they’re sliced like bacon! You can find beef sliced this way and get a few pounds for under $10USD . Get a big box of ziplocs and put about 3-4 slices in each one and then put them all in a big freezer ziploc. You can get about 20 portions out of it and all you need to do is either defrost and fry it in a pan or just drop in boiling water and let the fat also flavor your broth.

Fishball

I first discovered Taiwanese fishball – these are hollow and sometimes have crab, or fish eggs inside. I have found I prefer the Malaysian or Singaporean varieties – Dodo brand is quite good. These are solid and come in an array of flavors like cuttlefish, lobster and prawn. These will be at the seafood counter or frozen in bags. Just boil them (for freshly made fishball, boil until they float). These work great in the freezer, but if they get a little freezer burn, they’ll get a little rubbery. I like fishball in seafood and curry varieties.

Eggs

The thin shelled ovum of the domestic fowl can be found at most any grocery store. Fried on Mi Goreng, hard boiled with anything, stirred in with boiling broth, they work very well. I get asked ‘how do you get your eggs look that way’ when I make South Korean varieties sometimes. Well, it’s very common in Korea to simply drop a raw egg yolk ion a steaming hot bowl of ramyun. What I do is crack and egg into a ladle and rock it back and forth, letting the clear white of the egg spill out. There’s a little piece left which I’ll snip away. Drop on top of your noodles and stir it in. Eggs are relatively inexpensive and stay good for a long time.

Pepper Strands (Ito Toiughrasi)

I have only found these once and they were in a large Korean supermarket with the dehydrated chillies and pepper powders. They’re extremely thin threads of chilli pepper that you can put on your instant noodles to give a neat little gourmet look. I found that they add a hint of spiciness to the broth. A bag of these will last forever since you only need to use a small amount. Stoe in a ziploc after opening and put in your cupboard.

Carved Squid

You can buy fresh squid, carve crosshatched slices in it, cut it in strips and boil, or you can just buy a nice bag of frozen carved squid! They’re great in seafood instant noodles and have a nice texture and flavor to them. These will stay fine in the freezer for months – put them in a freezer bag once opened.

 

Got any favorite garnishes? Share them with me in a comment and they might make next years list!