Tag Archives: bone

#2960: Soup Daren Spicy Pork Bone Noodle

#2960: Soup Daren Spicy Pork Bone Noodle

Found this one among others up at FoodyWorld in Richmond, B. I just can’t get enough of Canada – it’s such a nice place with nice people and nice everything. This one looked fascinating – let’s check it out.

Soup Daren Spicy Pork Bone Noodle – China

#2960: Soup Daren Spicy Pork Bone Noodle

A distributor/import sticker (click to enlarge).

#2960: Soup Daren Spicy Pork Bone Noodle

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add in everything and boiling water to fill line. Cover for 4 minutes. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2960: Soup Daren Spicy Pork Bone Noodle

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2960: Soup Daren Spicy Pork Bone Noodle

An included fork!

#2960: Soup Daren Spicy Pork Bone Noodle

The noodle block.

#2960: Soup Daren Spicy Pork Bone Noodle

A liquid base sachet.

#2960: Soup Daren Spicy Pork Bone Noodle

Cloudy.

#2960: Soup Daren Spicy Pork Bone Noodle

A vegetables sachet.

#2960: Soup Daren Spicy Pork Bone Noodle

A colorful melange.

#2960: Soup Daren Spicy Pork Bone Noodle

A second liquid base sachet.

#2960: Soup Daren Spicy Pork Bone Noodle

Smells like black vinegar.

#2960: Soup Daren Spicy Pork Bone Noodle

Hey – what’s this?

#2960: Soup Daren Spicy Pork Bone Noodle

TVP chashu pork slices!

Finished (click to enlarge). Noodles are quite spongy here, which is unfortunate; they jibe a little rough with the broth. The broth, however is quite nice – tastes like a rich pork tonkotsu with a nice edginess of heat to it. The vegetable bits hydrated well and the TVP chashu – could have fooled me – I’m having trouble telling if this is TVP or pork. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.  6925303714857.

#2960: Soup Daren Spicy Pork Bone Noodle

Welcome to China (DK Readers)

A Soup Daren TV spot

#2605: Meet The Manufacturer: Nona Lim Pad See Ew Rice Noodles + Vietnamese Pho Broth

Meet The Manufacturer: Nona Lim Pad See Ew Rice Noodles + Vietnamese Pho Broth

So for this Meet The Manufacturer, things are a little different. Nona Lim makes noodles and broths, so you can mix and match them. First, we’ll start with these Pad See Ew Rice Noodles. Here’s what Wikipedia has to say about Pad See Ew –

The name of the dish translates to “fried (with) soy sauce” and it is very similar to the char kway teow of Singapore and Malaysia. Phat si-io is normally stir fried dry while another similar dish, rat na (in Thai) or lard na (in Laos), is served in a thickened sauce and generally has a lighter taste.[2][3]

Phat si-io is made with dark soy sauce (si-io dam), light soy sauce (si-io khao), garlic, broad rice noodles called kuaitiao sen yai in Thai (commonly abbreviated to just sen yai meaning “big strip”), Chinese broccoli, egg, and some form of thinly sliced meat — commonly pork, chicken or beef — or shrimp or mixed seafood.

Phat si-io is sometimes also called kuaitiao phat si-io, which reflects the general practice of using flat rice noodle as the main ingredient. However, other types of noodles may also be used.

Today, rather than attempting to make Pad See Ew from scratch, I thought I’d pair these noodles with one of their broth varieties – Vietnamese Pho. Let’s take a look at both of these products.

Nona Lim Pad See Ew Rice Noodles + Vietnamese Pho Broth – United States

Meet The Manufacturer: Nona Lim Pad See Ew Rice Noodles + Vietnamese Pho Broth

Here’s the back of the box (click to enlarge). To prepare, boil noodle in a pot for 1 minute. Drain. Finally, strain and rinse with cold water and enjoy!

Meet The Manufacturer: Nona Lim Pad See Ew Rice Noodles + Vietnamese Pho Broth

Two of these noodle pouches are in each box.

Meet The Manufacturer: Nona Lim Pad See Ew Rice Noodles + Vietnamese Pho Broth

Here is the Vietnamese Pho Brother. This comes in a large bag.

Here’s the back of the broth package (click to enlarge). Broth is made with beef bones. To prepare, add to a pot and heat on a stove. Finally, enjoy straight or with a Nona Lim noodle!

Finished (click to enlarge). Added coriander, Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, beef and fried onion. The noodles are very thin and broad. They are delicate but at the same time have a decent texture to them. The broth is probably the best pho I’ve had that I’ve not gotten at a restaurant. Since these are two separate products, I give the noodle 4.25 out of 5.0 stars and the broth 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.  UPC bar code for noodles 859792002316. Bar code for broth 859792002286.

Meet The Manufacturer: Nona Lim Pad See Ew Rice Noodles + Vietnamese Pho Broth

Into the Vietnamese Kitchen: Treasured Foodways, Modern Flavors

An interview with Nona Lim about her company

#2283: Nissin Raoh Pork Bone Soy Soup Noodle

This is another one sent by Colin from the east coast – thanks again! So pork bone broth is hugely popular in Japan and this sounds like a soy and pork variety to me. Let’s check out this premium variety!

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Unsure but probably contains pork. To prepare, add noodle block to 500ml boiling water and cook for 5 minutes. Add liquid sachet contents. Stir and enjoy!

The noodle block.

The liquid sachet.

A very thick liquid with a pork and soy scent.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, spring onion, hard boiled egg and sauteed pork with some shichimi togarashi atop. The noodles are big and thick with a compassionate chewiness and excellent quantity. The broth was really good – good thickness and the flavor was like a soy and pork combo. This just worked right and rubbed me the right way. 4.5 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4902105900673.

Nissin – Raoh Japanese Instant Ramen Pork Bone Soy Soup Noodles (For 5 Servings)

A Nissin Raoh TV commercial.

Meet The Manufacturer: #1993: Nissin Raoh Tonkotsu

Usually when I make tonkotsu, I add on some barbecue pork. This is what you’d usually find as an appetizer at a Chinese-American restaurant – the bright red edged tasty sliced pieces. Well, I was fortunate and on my birthday, my wife and two sons accompanied me to Uwajimaya, a Japanese supermarket in downtown Seattle. I wanted to find the real stuff – the chashu pork. After a lot of going from one end of the deli to the other, confusion with what I was looking for and finally almost giving up, a man brought me a nice package of freshly sliced chashu pork. I had him slice even more and now I have a nice stash of it in my freezer. This will be the first one I’ll be using this with – pretty excited! Now the bowl version of this product no doubt comes with a dehydrated slice of chashu pork which is very nice too! Let’s have a look at this one!

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Probably contains pork and fish. To prepare, add noodle block to 500ml boiling water. Cook for 1m30s. Add sachet contents to a bowl. Add in liquid and broth while stirring. Enjoy!

The noodle block.

The soup base sachet.

A light, cream color powder.

An oil sachet.

A seasoned oil with small pieces.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added chashu pork, Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts and kizami shoga. The noodles are a tad thinner than the regular Raoh noodles and straight. Good chew and firmness – definitely liked these for tonkotsu. The broth is a rich, creamy pork wonderzone of happiness and glee – definitely my favorite tonkotsu instant so far. This is excellent. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4902105900758.

Nissin – Raoh, Japanese Instant Ramen Noodles, Pork Bone Soup, 14.8oz (for 5 Servings)

A nice little Raoh TV advertisement.

#1050: Knorr Japanese Pork Bone Flavour Quick Serve Macaroni

I’ve had other macaroni quick serve products before by a different brand. I always thought these were interesting. Usually the only thing you’d find in the United States coupled with macaroni would be cheese, but elsewhere, the options are much different. Let’s check it out.

Distributor sticker (click image to enlarge).

Back of the package (click to enlarge).

Usually I put the noodle block on my table and take a pic, but I figured that could be messy with these.

The seasoning packet.

Has a salty smell.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added green onion, black forest ham and Urashima Sesame & Salt furikake. The macaroni is pretty good – a little crumbly but nicely sized with thin walls that hold broth. The broth is quite salty and has a familiar yet odd taste. Kind of like if you boiled a ton of hot dogs in a small sauce pan with the same water for a few weeks with a slight smoky flavor. It’s a weirdness I both find fascinating yet dissatisfying. 3.0 out of 5.0 stars.UPC bar code 4898829052648.

Not sure if this is the ‘official’ commercial or done by film students, but it’s interesting either way.

#584: Baijia Single Noble Black Bone Chicken Flavor Instant Sweet Potato Noodles

Black bone chicken? Baijia? Well, let’s give it a try. This is the last of the Baijia’s I have.

Here’s the ingredients and nutrition panel. Click image to enlarge.

Seasoned oil, powdered seasoning and vegetable things.

Now this looks a little foreboding. I guess time will tell.

Click image to enlarge. Noodles are again sweet potato based and horrid.
The broth was hideously greasy and nasty. The vegetable things were strange and inedible. 0 out of 5 stars.

This is a great documentary. Here in the US, you really don’t hear much about this since it was a Russian who orbited Earth the first time.

#433: Lucky Me! Supreme Bulalo Bone Marrow Flavor Noodle Soup (Cup)

So This one got reviewed at the studios of KIRO 97.3 FM yesterday – here’s a video of me making and trying it.

Click image to enlarge. So this stuff wasn’t bad. It had a nice beefy flavor to it and the noodles weren’t too soggy, although they were a little funky. 3.25 out of 5.0 stars. Get it here.

#312: Lucky Me! Supreme Bulalo Artificial Bone Marrow Flavor Instant Noodles

The last of the Lucky Me!’s I have in my noodle box. Bone marrow? Bring it with the beefiness!

I like the labeling on this one. I would go as far as to consider it a thorough extravaganza.

Powdered seasoning on the left, then a mini fork and a bag of weird veggie and fake meatery.

There you see the powder and the meatery fakery and the brick block cake or chunk of noodles. Refer to them however you prefer.

Click image to enlarge. One fried egg is in there. Broth – has a heartiness to it I found interesting- was like stroganoff. Noodles – well, not too super powered here… Veggies – so the floaty chewy things are back with aplomb. Still kind of unsettling and nonchalant. Overall, this fills the belly but that’s about it. The flavor ain’t nothin to write home about. Don’t smoke me a kipper – I won’t be back for breakfast for this one. 1.75 / 5.0 stars.