Tag Archives: 明星

#2906: Myojo Shoyu Sesame Chili Oil Yakisoba

#2756: Myojo Shoyu Sesame Chili Oil Yakisoba

Here’s a big tray of yakisoba I found up in Canada at Osaka Market in Yaohan Centre, Richmond, BC. Yeah, that’s a mouthful. Anyways, sometimes they’ll have a special on Japanese varieties that are somewhat new and this is one of them. Here’s a little about yakisoba from Wikipedia for you –

Yakisoba (焼きそば[jakiꜜsoba]), literally “fried buckwheat,” is a Japanese noodle stir-fry dish. Although soba means buckwheat, yakisoba noodles are actually made from wheat flour, and are typically flavored with a condiment similar to oyster sauce. The dish first appeared in food stalls in Japan during the early 20th century.[1]

Yakisoba is prepared by frying ramen-style wheat noodles with bite-sized pork, vegetables (usually cabbageonions or carrots) and flavored with yakisoba sauce, salt and pepper. It can be served with a variety of garnishes, such as aonori (seaweed powder), beni shoga (shredded pickled ginger), katsuobushi (fish flakes), and mayonnaise.

Yakisoba is most familiarly served on a plate either as a main dish or a side dish. Another popular way to prepare and serve yakisoba in Japan is to pile the noodles into a bun sliced down the middle in the style of a hot dog, and garnish the top with mayonnaise and shreds of pickled ginger. Called yakisoba-pan (pan meaning bread) it is commonly available at local festivals or konbini (convenience stores).

Sometimes, Japanese white Udon is used as a replacement of Chinese style Soba and called Yakiudon. This variation was started in Kitakyushu or Kokura in Fukuoka Prefecture.

In Okinawa, Yakisoba is popular with Okinawans and U.S. service members stationed on the island alike. After the 1945 hostilities ended on Okinawa, the US military command supplied American food products to the malnourished residents. The preferred Okinawan Yakisoba was prepared from spaghetti, spam, ketchup, any available vegetable (usually canned), and mayonnaise for frying. Mess halls and other on-base eateries often serve yakisoba. Chopped hotdogs are a popular addition to yakisoba made on Okinawa, in addition to other meats such as ham, chicken, and pork.

Alright – let’s give it a go.

Myojo Shoyu Sesame Chili Oil Yakisoba – Japan

#2756: Myojo Shoyu Sesame Chili Oil Yakisoba

The distributor/import stickler (click to enlarge).

#2756: Myojo Shoyu Sesame Chili Oil Yakisoba

Detail of the out wraps (click to enlarge). Contains pork and chicken. To prepare, add noodle block and solid ingredients sachet to tray and boiling water to fill line. Cover for 3 minutes. Drain using special lid. Add in liquid base and dry sachet and stir. Finally, ganish with mayonnaise and enjoy!

#2756: Myojo Shoyu Sesame Chili Oil Yakisoba

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2756: Myojo Shoyu Sesame Chili Oil Yakisoba

The noodle block.

#2756: Myojo Shoyu Sesame Chili Oil Yakisoba

A large liquid base sachet.

#2756: Myojo Shoyu Sesame Chili Oil Yakisoba

Yakisoba sauce.

#2756: Myojo Shoyu Sesame Chili Oil Yakisoba

A dry sachet.

#2756: Myojo Shoyu Sesame Chili Oil Yakisoba

Perhaps togarashi and chives?

#2756: Myojo Shoyu Sesame Chili Oil Yakisoba

Solid ingredients.

#2756: Myojo Shoyu Sesame Chili Oil Yakisoba

Chashu, narutomaki and spring onion.

#2756: Myojo Shoyu Sesame Chili Oil Yakisoba

Mayonnaise!

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion amd Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts. The noodles come out great – and plentiful. They indeed have a soy sauce and sesame kind of combo with a touch of heat. The mayo is great as it makes it nice and greasy. The large naruto slice and chashu are very nice, and bits of cabbage are throughout. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4902881419123.

#2756: Myojo Shoyu Sesame Chili Oil Yakisoba

MYOJO IPPEI-CHAN YOMISE Y A K I S O B A INSTANT NOODLE CASE [12pcs] by Myojo

Myojo commercials from 1977-1990

#2801: Myojo Ippei-Chan Yomise-No Yakisoba Barbeque Sauce Flavor With Mayonnaise

#2801: Myojo Ippei-Chan Yomise-No Yakisoba Barbeque Sauce Flavor With Mayonnaise

Hey look at this! This came by way of Hobby Link Japan, a great site that has all sorts of amazing Japanese things including instant noodles! Thank you very much! This variety is a yakisoba with barbeque sauce and mayonnaise! I tell ya, this sounds really quite good to me! Here’s a little about it from Wikipedia –

Yakisoba (焼きそば[jakiꜜsoba]), literally “fried buckwheat,” is a Japanese noodle stir-fry dish. Although soba means buckwheat, yakisoba noodles are actually made from wheat flour, and are typically flavored with a condiment similar to oyster sauce. The dish first appeared in food stalls in Japan during the early 20th century.[1]

Yakisoba is most familiarly served on a plate either as a main dish or a side dish. Another popular way to prepare and serve yakisoba in Japan is to pile the noodles into a bun sliced down the middle in the style of a hot dog, and garnish the top with mayonnaise and shreds of pickled ginger. Called yakisoba-pan (pan meaning bread) it is commonly available at local festivals or konbini (convenience stores).

Sometimes, Japanese white Udon is used as a replacement of Chinese style Soba and called Yakiudon. This variation was started in Kitakyushu or Kokura in Fukuoka Prefecture.

In Okinawa, Yakisoba is popular with Okinawans and U.S. service members stationed on the island alike. After the 1945 hostilities ended on Okinawa, the US military command supplied American food products to the malnourished residents. The preferred Okinawan version was prepared from spaghetti, spam, ketchup, any available vegetable (usually canned), and mayonnaise for frying. Mess halls and other on-base eateries often serve yakisoba. Chopped hotdogs are a popular addition to yakisoba made on Okinawa, in addition to other meats such as ham, chicken, and pork.

Alright – I’m excited to give this one a try – let’s go!

Myojo Ippei-Chan Yomise-No Yakisoba Barbeque Sauce Flavor With Mayonnaise – Japan

#2801: Myojo Ippei-Chan Yomise-No Yakisoba Barbeque Sauce Flavor With Mayonnaise

Detail of the outer wraps (click to enlarge). contains pork. To prepare, add boilign water to fill line and cover for four minutes. Use spout to drain. Add in sachet contents and combine. Finally, garnish with mayonnaise and enjoy!

#2801: Myojo Ippei-Chan Yomise-No Yakisoba Barbeque Sauce Flavor With Mayonnaise

The lid under the plastic wraps (click to enlarge).

#2801: Myojo Ippei-Chan Yomise-No Yakisoba Barbeque Sauce Flavor With Mayonnaise

The noodle block.

#2801: Myojo Ippei-Chan Yomise-No Yakisoba Barbeque Sauce Flavor With Mayonnaise

Loose bits from the tray.

#2801: Myojo Ippei-Chan Yomise-No Yakisoba Barbeque Sauce Flavor With Mayonnaise

A sauce sachet.

#2801: Myojo Ippei-Chan Yomise-No Yakisoba Barbeque Sauce Flavor With Mayonnaise

Smells like barbeque sauce.

#2801: Myojo Ippei-Chan Yomise-No Yakisoba Barbeque Sauce Flavor With Mayonnaise

A mayonnaise sachet.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion, shichimi togarashi, chashu pork and Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts. The noodles are great and there’s enough for a couple people. The flavor is a nice barbeque sauce taste. The mayonnaise gives it a good lick of greasiness which moves things about easier. Supplied garnish of cabbage and meat was spot on. The McRib of yakisoba.5.0 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4902881419192.

#2801: Myojo Ippei-Chan Yomise-No Yakisoba Barbeque Sauce Flavor With Mayonnaise

Myojo Ippeichan Yomise no Y a k i s o b a Omori Noodles BBQ Sauce

A TV commercial for this range

#2715: Myojo Hyobanya Shio Yakisoba

#2215: Myojo Hyobanya Shio Yakisoba - Japan - zenpop zenpop.jp www.zenpop.jp

Today we have a Zenpop.JP variety – so what’s Zenpop? They’re a subscription service for all things Japanese! Definitely, check them out. By the way, use coupon code RAMENRATER to get $2 off! Here’s what they had to say about this variety:

This is also low-salt but you would never notice that (which is same for other noodles in this pack too!) It has a flavor of savory beef and vegetable. Nice and simple! Enjoy this popular Japanese noodle dish anytime. 

This Myojo variety is a yakisoba – here’s a little about it from Wikipedia –

Yakisoba (焼きそば[jakʲiꜜsoba]), literally “fried buckwheat,” is a Japanese noodle stir-fry dish. Although soba means buckwheat, yakisoba noodles are actually made from wheat flour, and are typically flavored with a condiment similar to oyster sauce. The dish first appeared in food stalls in Japan during the early 20th century.[1]

Yakisoba is most familiarly served on a plate either as a main dish or a side dish. Another popular way to prepare and serve yakisoba in Japan is to pile the noodles into a bun sliced down the middle in the style of a hot dog, and garnish the top with mayonnaise and shreds of pickled ginger. Called yakisoba-pan (pan meaning bread) it is commonly available at local festivals or konbini (convenience stores).

Sometimes, Japanese white Udon is used as a replacement of Chinese style Soba and called Yakiudon. This variation was started in Kitakyushu or Kokura in Fukuoka Prefecture.

In Okinawa, Yakisoba is popular with Okinawans and U.S. service members stationed on the island alike. After the 1945 hostilities ended on Okinawa, the US military command supplied American food products to the malnourished residents. The preferred Okinawan Yakisoba was prepared from spaghetti, spam, ketchup, any available vegetable (usually canned), and mayonnaise for frying. Mess halls and other on-base eateries often serve yakisoba. Chopped hotdogs are a popular addition to yakisoba made on Okinawa, in addition to other meats such as ham, chicken, and pork.

Sounds great to me – let’s take a look!

Myojo Hyobanya Shio Yakisoba – Japan

#2215: Myojo Hyobanya Shio Yakisoba - Japan - zenpop zenpop.jp www.zenpop.jp

Detail of the bottom and side panels (click to enlarge because this took extra long for me to do). Contains pork, chicken, and beef. To prepare, add boiling water to line and cover for 3 minutes. Use drain spout to drain carefully. Add in sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2215: Myojo Hyobanya Shio Yakisoba - Japan - zenpop zenpop.jp www.zenpop.jp

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2215: Myojo Hyobanya Shio Yakisoba - Japan - zenpop zenpop.jp www.zenpop.jp

The noodle block.

#2215: Myojo Hyobanya Shio Yakisoba - Japan - zenpop zenpop.jp www.zenpop.jp

Loose bits from inside the tray.

#2215: Myojo Hyobanya Shio Yakisoba - Japan - zenpop zenpop.jp www.zenpop.jp

The liquid base sachet.

#2215: Myojo Hyobanya Shio Yakisoba - Japan - zenpop zenpop.jp www.zenpop.jp

Oil and seasoning.

#2215: Myojo Hyobanya Shio Yakisoba - Japan - zenpop zenpop.jp www.zenpop.jp

The garnish sachet.

#2215: Myojo Hyobanya Shio Yakisoba - Japan - zenpop zenpop.jp www.zenpop.jp

Has a seaweed scent.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added baked chicken, spring onion, and Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts. The noodles were light and almost a little fluffy. The flavor was really great – definitely a grilled chicken kind of taste which was very good. The bits of meat and cabbage were nicely hydrated and of good quality. 4.5 out of 5.0 stars.  JAN bar code 4902881426367.

#2215: Myojo Hyobanya Shio Yakisoba - Japan - zenpop zenpop.jp www.zenpop.jp

MYOJO IPPEI-CHAN YOMISE Y A K I S O B A  INSTANT NOODLE CASE [12pcs] by Myojo

I’m unusre but I think this guy does a periodic run-down of the new instant ramen in Japan

#2633: Myojo Chukazanmai Premium Sour & Spicy Noodle Soup

#2633: Myojo Chukazanmai Premium Sour & Spicy Noodle Soup - Japan - The Ramen Rater - boxfromjapan.com

Here’s one sent by Javier over at Box From Japan. Box From Japan is a monthly subscription service where you can get boxes of neat Japanese instant ramen or boxes of candy and they have other special ones as well! Definitely, give them a look!

So this variety is sour and spicy – and the sour comes from black vinegar. Black vinegar adds a kind of tangy tartness which I find a really neat condiment and works really well in noodle varieties I’ve tried. Let’s check out this bowl Chukazanmai!

Myojo Chukazanmai Premium Sour & Spicy Noodle Soup – Japan

#2633: Myojo Chukazanmai Premium Sour & Spicy Noodle Soup - Japan - The Ramen Rater - boxfromjapan.com

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, pull lid back and add powder and solid block. Fill with 400ml boiling water and cover for 5 minutes. Add in liquid sachet. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2633: Myojo Chukazanmai Premium Sour & Spicy Noodle Soup - Japan - The Ramen Rater - boxfromjapan.com

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2633: Myojo Chukazanmai Premium Sour & Spicy Noodle Soup - Japan - The Ramen Rater - boxfromjapan.com

A fancy noodle block.

#2633: Myojo Chukazanmai Premium Sour & Spicy Noodle Soup - Japan - The Ramen Rater - boxfromjapan.com

The powder base sachet.

#2633: Myojo Chukazanmai Premium Sour & Spicy Noodle Soup - Japan - The Ramen Rater - boxfromjapan.com

Definitely a lot of powder here.

#2633: Myojo Chukazanmai Premium Sour & Spicy Noodle Soup - Japan - The Ramen Rater - boxfromjapan.com

A solid block.

#2633: Myojo Chukazanmai Premium Sour & Spicy Noodle Soup - Japan - The Ramen Rater - boxfromjapan.com

Freeze dried ingredients that really spring to life when added to boiling water. Usually vegetables and meats.

#2633: Myojo Chukazanmai Premium Sour & Spicy Noodle Soup - Japan - The Ramen Rater - boxfromjapan.com

A liquid base sachet.

#2633: Myojo Chukazanmai Premium Sour & Spicy Noodle Soup - Japan - The Ramen Rater - boxfromjapan.com

Black vinegar.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, Chinese sausage, and spring onion. The noodles have a strong chew and good backbone – a good reason to call this one premium. The broth has a nice balance of sweetness, sour tanginess from black vinegar, and an underlying afterthought kind of spiciness from Sichuan pepper. Very interesting and quite good. The inclusion of the freeze-dried block that expands with a nice variety of vegetables rounds out the bowl. 4.25 out of 5.0 stars.  JAN bar code 4902881421386.

#2633: Myojo Chukazanmai Premium Sour & Spicy Noodle Soup - Japan - The Ramen Rater - boxfromjapan.com

Myojo Instant Ramen Assorted Soy Sauce (Pack of 4), Miso (Pack of 4), Oriental Salt (Pack of 4) Flavor, 3.73-Ounce (Total Pack of 12)

A trove of old Myojo TV commercials!

#2591: Myojo Charumera Licca Chan Onion Gratin Soup Noodle

#2591: Myojo Charumera Licca Chan Onion Gratin Soup Noodle - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles ramen

Found these up in Canada at the Osaka market in Yaohan Centre.                            So I’ve seen this on instagram a few times and been wondering what the big deal is. Moreover, what is Licca? Here’s something from Wikipedia –

icca-chan (リカちゃん Rika-chan), full name Licca Kayama (香山リカ Kayama Rika),[1] is a dress-up doll series introduced in Japan on 1967-07-04 by Takara,[1][2] enjoying the same kind of popularity in Japan as the Barbie series does in the United States.[3] The Licca-chan dolls tend toward a more Japanese body as far as height and features. Takara had sold over 48 million Licca-chan dolls as of 2002,[1] and over 53 million as of 2007.[3] Licca-chan was created by former shōjo manga artist, Miyako Maki, who is also the wife of Leiji Matsumoto.

Takara has provided an extensive background story for the Licca-chan doll, including an age (11), where she attends school, names and occupations for her parents, and her favorite books (Anne of Green Gables and A Little Princess). Licca-chan also likes Doraemon.[1]

Rough Trade Records teamed up with Takara in the late 90’s to release “Street Licca”, who was a DJ that carried a Rough Trade record satchel, and mini, doll-sized LPs from the labels’ artists. Along with her Ursula 1000, Gants and Spearmint records, she toted a pair of pink Converse running shoes, grey “leather” pants, headphones, layered hoody and a blond bob haircut. Street Licca was the ultimate “indie rock” doll.

In 2001, a pregnant adult version of Licca-chan was introduced which included a postcard the purchaser could send to Takara for a baby doll. The baby came with a key which allowed the doll to be returned to its standard proportions.[1][4] The release of the doll happened to coincide with the birth of Aiko, the daughter of Crown Prince Naruhito and Crown Princess Masako of Japan, a factor which helped boost the sales of the new doll.[4] Since then, other versions of Licca-chan have been introduced, including a new “Departure Licca”, released just ahead of the 40th anniversary in 2007.[3]

A Licca-chan video game was released for the Nintendo DS in Japan on November 29, 2007.[5] This game was later released in the U.S. on October 14, 2008 as Lovely Lisa.[6]

OK so kind of like a Japanese Barbie doll I suppose. Plus it’s the 50th anniversary of it’s inception. Okay – let’s check out this onion noodle.

Myojo Charumera Licca Chan Onion Gratin Soup Noodle – Japan

#2591: Myojo Charumera Licca Chan Onion Gratin Soup Noodle - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles ramen

The import/distributor sticker (click to enlarge).

#2591: Myojo Charumera Licca Chan Onion Gratin Soup Noodle - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles ramen

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains fish. To prepare, add 290ml boiling water and cover for 3 minutes. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2591: Myojo Charumera Licca Chan Onion Gratin Soup Noodle - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles ramen

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2591: Myojo Charumera Licca Chan Onion Gratin Soup Noodle - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles ramen

The noodle block.

#2591: Myojo Charumera Licca Chan Onion Gratin Soup Noodle - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles ramen

Some loose garnish from the cup.

A fishcake bow. Only found one of these.

Finished (click to enlarge). The noodles actually were quite good – soft and plentiful. The broth is a very rich and onion flavored affair with lots of add-ons including a bow made of fishcake and little bits of meat as well as some vegetable.  Very rich and satisfying. 4.25 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4902881422772.

#2591: Myojo Charumera Licca Chan Onion Gratin Soup Noodle - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles ramen

Myojo L i c c a   c h a n  cup noodles onion gratin soup 66g×12 Japan ramen

Commercials for this character over the years

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Here’s another one I found in Taiwan on my trip in November of 2016. Yakisoba is one of my favorites – and my wife Kit likes it quite a bit as well. As I’ve said before, I’m usually quite a few reviews ahead as normally I do two reviews a day but only post one. Right now It’s February 20th, 2017 and our new President Trump has only been in office for a month. I have to assure my friends from all over the world that indeed not all of us are rude and boorish as he is and respect other people’s rights. That being said, let’s talk more about this one!

This is a yaki soba with mentaiko and mentaiko flavored mayo. Here’s some info from Wikipedia about mentaiko:

Pollock roe, the salted roe of Alaska pollock, is a popular culinary ingredient in Japan, Korea, and Russia. In Korea, the roe of Alaska pollock is traditionally called myeongnan (명란), and the salted roe is called myeongnanjeot (명란젓). The food was introduced to Japan after World War II, and is called mentaiko (明太子) in Japanese. The milder, less spicy version is called tarako (鱈子) in Japan. In Russian, it is called ikra mintaya (икра минтая).

Yessir – fish eggs! They’re pretty common in Japanese foods. They’re bright and colorful and I like ’em! So let’s check out this mentaiko flavor instant yakisoba!

Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor – Japan

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Detail of the side and bottom of the package (click to enlarge).

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge). Contains fish products. To prepare, open tab 1 to dotted line marked 2. Remove sachets. Add boiling water to line and close for 3 minutes. Open tab 3 to expose drain spout and drain. Add in sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The noodle block.

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Some loose pieces in the tray.

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

A liquid sachet.

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Definitely yakisoba sauce.

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

A dry sachet.

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The mentaiko.

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The mentaiko taste karashi mayo.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion and Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts. The noodles have a nice chew and the sheer amount of them is pretty impressive. They have a nice slaty and oily taste with a bit of mentaiko throughout. The karashi masyo with mentaiko flavor is really good – also lubes up the noodles a little more. 4.5 out of 5.0 stars.  JAN bar code 4902881436137.

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

MYOJO IPPEI-CHAN YOMISE YAKISOBA INSTANT NOODLE CASE [12pcs] by Myojo

A vintage Myojo TV commercial for Yakisoba Jumbo.

#2289: Myojo Shin-Toyama Black Ramen

Here’s another one sent to me by Javier from Box From Japan. Box From Japan has subscriptions for all sorts of neat Japanese things. I regret to say that I was informed that they won’t be taking subscriptions for their ramen boxes for now – hopefully that will start again soon. He mentioned that you can purchase instant noodles from them here. Here’s what he had to say about this particular variety:

The Noodles: Thick, filling, deep fried noodles. The surface of the noodles glistens and they have a palatable, plump yet rm texture. The Soup: A pitch black soy sauce flavored soup. It is a recreation of the merits of Toyama Black, with savory flavors, such as fish sauce and chicken, combined with soy sauce and given a punch with black pepper. We have evolved the flavor by adding an original arrangement of sprinkled spices combining fish powder with black pepper and chili pepper. The Toppings: Roast pork, bamboo shoots, and green onions.

Only one or two of these from Javier left. Let’s check this one out!

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains pork and fish. To prepare, add dry sachet contents to bowl and fill to line with boiling water. Let steep covered for 5 minutes. Add in liquid sachet. Stir and enjoy!

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

The noodle block.

The liquid base.

Indeed, this looks murky…

A seasoning sachet.

Black pepper mixture.

The vegetables sachet.

Vegetables and pork.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion and hard boiled egg. The noodles came out pretty well – kind of soft for the thickness of them, but they worked. The broth is definitely a murky swamp of blackness with a definitive black pepper taste and a kind of soy thing going on. The included vegetables were alright – the menma was not mushy but was slightly tough. The slice of pork seemed more like pepperoni than chashu. 3.75 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4902881418348.

Myojo Tonkotsu Noodles, Creamy, 7.37 Ounce

A TV spot for Myojo’s Yakisoba

#2190: Myojo Barikata Noukou Tonkotsu Shoyu

Here’s another one from Javier over at BoxFromJapan.com! Box From Japan is a subscription service – you can get a box of ramen (and candy too) from Japan every month for $25. I can honestly say I still haven’t gotten a variety I’ve reviewed before from them – something pretty amazing! Here’s what they had to say about this variety:

The Noodles: Noodles with a harmony of hardness, straightness, and thinness. The rich soup accentuates the unique noodles. The noodles have a floury quality while still being ramen shop-esque. They are non-fried noodles with an added hardness and al dente quality. The Soup: We first added soy sauce, garlic, and ginger to a pork bone extract base. We then combined the mixture with a potherb blended pork oil to achieve a rich, smooth pork bone soy sauce flavor. The soup’s compatibility with the noodles is extraordinary. The Toppings: We focused mainly on roast pork, adding bamboo shoots and green onions, plus sweet red pepper for color.

Awesome! Let’s check it out!

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains pork and fish. To prepare, add in all but the liquid sachets. Add boiling water to fill line and cover for one minute. Add in liquid sachet contents. Stir and enjoy!

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

The noodle block.

The powder soup base sachet.

Light and fluffy powder.

The liquid sachet.

A thick liquid base.

The garnish sachet.

A slice of pork and some vegetables.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, spring onion, hard boiled egg and chashu pork. The bowl was done so fast (literally sixty seconds) and the noodles were just perfect. This and definitely had a floury flavor to them – reminisent of Hakata style. The broth was like a gravy – a sloppy tasty wonderful gravywith some amazing flavor. The bits of vegetables were decent as well. The only problem I had with this one was the slice of pork, which was a little on the rubbery side with a kind of over seasoned thing going on. Aside from that, this was a top ten bowl. 4.75 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 4902881421553.

Myojo Tonkotsu Noodles, Creamy, 7.37 Ounce

A TV advert for Myojo Yakisoba.

#1621: Myojo Men White Creamy Tonkotsu

A while back I reviewed the Myojo Men Black Seafood Tonkotsu. Well, this is the white creamy variety. Tonkotsu is usually made from pork bone broth – pork bones and boiled for quite a while to pull out the flavor, and it gets a milky color. This one’s manufactured in the United States by Myojo, and so pork products are present. Let’s see how this creamy tonkotsu variety stacks up/.

Detail from the side panels (click image to enlarge). Contains pork. To prepare, put noodles and contents of sachets into bowl and add hot water to line. Microwave for 3 minutes. Stir and enjoy!

Detail of the lid (click image to enlarge).

The fresh noodles pouch.

The creamy tonkotsu soup base sachet.

Has a creamy look to it.

The vegetables sachet.

Spring onion and seaweed.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added hard boiled egg, spring onion, mung bean sprouts and pork. The noodles are a little thinner than fresh udon. They have a decent chew to them. The broth has a richness to it I enjoyed, but there was an underlying acidity that was slightly off-putting. The hydratables did just fine and there was quite a nice pit of seaweed. 3.0 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 011152212388.

Myojo Bowl Noodle Creamy Tonkotsu (Pack of 12×7.37z)

A Japanese Myojo Charumera TV advertisement.

#1607: Myojo Nyumen Desse Shoyu

This is one got last year on my birthday trip to Canada! Really excited that the next trip is coming up very quickly! My wife, son and sister will be coming this time, so it should be a lot of fun. Today’s review is on Myojo Desse Nyumen. So, what’s nyumen? Wikipedia had this to say:

Sōmen (?) are very thin—less than 1.3 mm in diameter. They are white Japanese noodles made of wheat flour. The noodles are usually served cold. The noodles’ diameter is the chief distinction between sōmen and the thicker wheat noodles hiyamugi and Japanese wheat noodles udon. Sōmen noodles are stretched when made, as are some types of udon noodles. The dough is stretched with the help of vegetable oil to make very thin strips and then air dried.

Sōmen are usually served cold with a light flavored dipping sauce[1] or tsuyu. The tsuyu is usually a katsuobushi-based sauce that can be flavored with Japanese bunching onion, ginger, or myoga. In the summer, sōmen chilled with ice is a popular meal to help stay cool.

Sōmen served in hot soup is usually called “nyumen” and eaten in the winter, much like soba or udon are.

So I suppose since it’s still Winter, this is fitting. Let’s check it out!

The distributor’s sticker (click image to enlarge). Contains egg.

 Detail from the side panels (click image to enlarge). To prepare, add in contents of sachet and add 390ml boiling water. cover for 3 minutes and stir. Enjoy!

Detail of the lid (click image to enlarge).

The noodle block.

The soup base sachet.

Has a strong soy scent.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added spring onion. The noodles are indeed very thin somen and ended up kind of mushy. The broth is a light, salty soy flavor. 2.75 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4902881416368.

If you’ve never had this, do yourself a favor – these are some of the best yakosoba out there and it’s a pretty good deal! MYOJO IPPEI-CHAN YOMISE YAKISOBA INSTANT NOODLE CASE [12pcs]

A Myojo TV spot for their yakisoba products.

#1551: Myojo Men Black Seafood Tonkotsu

Got this one down in California during our summer trip! JFC distributes a lot of different products here in the USA from Japan and elsewhere. I’m curious what the actual brand here is. Those characters at the top look extremely familiar…

Yep – that’s what I thought – it’s Myojo’s new ‘Myojo Men’ line! It’s strange; as a daily reviewer of instant noodles and spending a lot of time examining packages of all types from all over the world, I have started recognizing bits and pieces of different printed languages – Korean, Chinese, Japanese… Usually when it pertains to a brand name or the word instant noodle. I’m pretty sure I could do alright in most countries if I were looking for instant noodles, although my accent or intonation might sound ridiculous! For those new to ramen, here’s a quick blurb from Wikipedia about tonkotsu ramen:

Tonkotsu (豚骨, “pork bone”; not to be confused with tonkatsu) ramen usually has a cloudy white colored broth. It is similar to the Chinese baitang (白湯) and has a thick broth made from boiling pork bones, fat, and collagen over high heat for many hours, which suffuses the broth with a hearty pork flavor and a creamy consistency that rivals milk, melted butter or gravy (depending on the shop). Most shops, but not all, blend this pork broth with a small amount of chicken and vegetable stock and/or soy sauce. The noodles are thin and straight, and it is often served with beni shoga (pickled ginger). In recent years the latest trend in tonkotsu toppings ismāyu (sesame oil), a blackish, aromatic oil made from either charred crushed garlic or Sesame seeds. It is a specialty of Kyushu, particularly Hakata-ku, Fukuoka (hence sometimes called “Hakata ramen”).

Anyways, let’s check out this seafood tonkotsu by Myojo, distro’d by JFC.

Here’s detail of the side panels (click image to enlarge). Contains pork and fish. To prepare, Put all contents into the bowl. Add hot water up to line. Microwave for 3 minutes. Stir and enjoy!

Detail of the lid (click image to enlarge).

The fresh noodle pouch.

Liquid base sachet.

Has a strong seafood scent.

The vegetables sachet.

Green onion and seaweed.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added kamaboko, narutomaki and sliced spring onion. The noodles were alright; they kind of had a kind of ‘off’ texture which I wasn’t pleased with; they seemed kind of stiff. The broth however was quite good – wonderful pork and seafood flavor going on here. The dehydrated green onion and seaweed hydrated perfectly. 3.5 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 011152212364.

Myojo Tonkotsu Noodles, Seafood, 7.44 Ounce – get it on Amazon!

A Myojo Charumera TV commercial!

#1179: Myojo Chukazanmai Guangdong Style Ramen

Here’s one that my friend Scott A. sent me – thanks again! Been a long time since I’ve had any of the Chukazanmai varieties – fancy shmancy stuff – let’s check this one out!

The back of the package (click image to enlarge).

Nice noodles – non fried.

The powder sachet.

Light powder.

The liquid sachet.

Has a very soy scent.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added sauteed pork and Walla Walla sweet onion and garnished with Urashima Vegetable Furikake and green onions. The noodles and luxuriant and have a very good feel and chew. They are high quality and reminiscent of fresh ramen noodles. The broth is strong with good soy flavor and a deep rich flavor. 4.25 out of 5.0 stars.UPC bar code 4902881052276.

[AMAZONPRODUCTS asin=”B004BJVLWC”]

A Myojo Chukazanmai TV ad.