Tag Archives: thin

#1667: Deshome Aloe Thin Noodles With Camellia Oil Vegetable Sauce Flavor

Camelia oil – this is a new thing to me. I was curious – why camelia oil? Wikipedia had this to say:

Tea seed oil (also known as Tea Oil Camellia or oil-seed Camellia) is an edible, pale amber-green fixed oil with a sweet, herbal aroma. It is cold-pressed mainly from the seeds of Camellia sinensis.

With its high smoke point (252°C, 485°F), tea seed oil is the main cooking oil in some of the southern provinces of China, such as Hunan—roughly one-seventh of the country’s population.

Tea seed oil resembles olive oil and grape seed oil in its excellent storage qualities[citation needed] and low content of saturated fat. Monounsaturated oleic acid may comprise up to 88 percent of the fatty acids. It is high in vitamin E and other antioxidants and contains no natural trans fats.

Tea seed oil is used in salad dressings, dips, marinades and sauces, for sautéing, stir frying and frying and in margarine production.

Interesting! Let’s check it out!

A sticker on the back of the package (click image to enlarge).

Here’s the back of the package, sans sticker (click image to enlarge). Says it is vegetarian on the front. To prepare, add noodles to a pot of boiling water and cook for 3-4 minutes. In a bowl, add sachet contents along with 1-2 spoonfuls of water and stir. Drain noodles and combine with sauce. Enjoy!

These noodles are made with aloe and are sun dried.

The vegetable sauce.

Has a very nice vegetable scent.

The camelia oil.

Definitely aromatic – pleasantly so.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added a little spring onion. The noodles have a very light and happy texture to them – soft and springy. There’s quite a lot of them, too! The flavor is delicately balanced. Camellia oil is definitely not overwhelming and gives a nice slick feel to the noodles and the vegetable sauce has a nice veggie taste which has a light taste as well. Everything mingled just right in this one. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 4716873922511.

The Edible Flower Garden(from Amazon) A unique gardening guide and recipe collection offering over 25 planting schemes with accompanying recipes showing how to use the flowers in the kitchen, and including an illustrated directory of 45 edible flowers.

Deshome’s Shelley Su appearing on a Taiwanese talk show.

#1618: Deshome Aloe Thin Noodles With Camellia Oil Spicy Bean Sauce Flavor

Deshome makes some pretty unique noodles, using ingredients I’ve never thought would go into a noodle. Aloe, bee pollen, and now, camellia oil in a sachet.Fascinating! Let’s have a look at this camellia oil variety from Deshome of Taiwan!

Here’s the sticker from the back of the package (click image to enlarge).

Here’s the back of the package, sans sticker (click image to enlarge). Says it is vegetarian on the front. To prepare, add noodles to a pot of boiling water and cook for 3-4 minutes. In a bowl, add sachet contents along with 1-2 spoonfuls of water and stir. Drain noodles and combine with sauce. Enjoy!

The sun dried noodle blocks.

The spicy sauce sachet.

Has a nice soybean scent.

The camellia oil sachet.

Has an interesting aroma to it.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added white onion and spring onion. The noodles were or very nice quality and quantity. The flavor was a little on the muted and bland side, however what I did taste I liked. The oil made it a very nice and rich dish of noodles. Unfortunately, the blandness weighed heavily on the score. 2.5 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 4716873922528.

The Edible Flower Garden(from Amazon) A unique gardening guide and recipe collection offering over 25 planting schemes with accompanying recipes showing how to use the flowers in the kitchen, and including an illustrated directory of 45 edible flowers.

Deshome’s Shelley Su appearing on a Taiwanese talk show.

#1055: Meet The Manufacturer: A-Sha Dry Noodle QQ Thin Noodle – BBQ Sauce

Today we’ve got the thinnest noodles I think I’ve seen in a pack. I was curious about the whole QQ thing so I looked it up and found this on Quora:

It’s a phrase mostly encountered in Taiwan that means “toothsome,” or “chewy.” It is similar to the Italian phrase, al dente. QQ is generally considered a desirable quality in Taiwanese cuisine, as it contributes to mouth feel.

It says on the back that these noodles should only be cooked for one and a half minutes. Interesting – let’s check this out!

The back of the package (click image to enlarge). This one contains fish called bream.

I must say these are the thinnest, wispiest noodles I’ve ever seen that are made from wheat.

The sauce packet.

Has a nice scent – I smell the soy sauce the most.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added a fried egg, red bell pepper, sweet onion, Urashima Sesame & Salt furikake, and beef sauteed with a little garlic salt. These noodles are great! Very light and thin and honesty they seem to be happy. It’s a perfect balance of texture and delicateness. They definitely are wonderful to chew. The BBQ sauce? Well, this isn’t what most would think of when you say BBQ sauce – it’s not the 99 cents a bottle stuff at the local grocery store. Instead, it’s a very enjoyable and tasty flavor with nice depth. Soy sauce, garlic, a slight spiciness and other flavors are represented in a wonderful flavor that doesn’t have the usual American ‘slather’ BBQ sauce feel. This is excellent. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.  UPC bar code 4715635850666.

[AMAZONPRODUCTS asin=”B00C7VQHX4″]

A National Geographic Mega Cities special about Taipei.

#716: Vifon Hủ Tiếu Cá Asian Style Rice Noodles With Stewed Fish

Stewed fish huh? Found this one at Uwajimaya in Seattle around my birthday. It says there’s fish in there… Hmm.

Here’s a closeup of the text on the top (click image to enlarge). Basa fish it says… Hmmm… What’s Basa fish? Well, Wikipedia says:

The basa fish, Pangasius bocourti, is a type of catfish in the family Pangasiidae. Basa are native to the Mekong River Delta in Vietnam and Chao Phraya basin in Thailand.[1] These fish are important food fish with an international market. They are often labeled in North America and Australia as “basa fish” or “bocourti”.[2] In the UK, the species is known mainly as “river cobbler”,[3] with “basa” also being used on occasion. In Europe, these fish are commonly marketed as “pangasius” or “panga“.[4] Other related shark catfish may occasionally be falsely labeled as basa fish, including Pangasianodon hypophthalmus (iridescent shark) and Pangasius pangasius (yellowtail catfish).

Wow – that’s interesting! So its like catfish eh? Here’s a link to the full Wikipedia article.

Kind of looks like a bunch of tape! This is going to be an interesting bowl of noodles!

Hey – an included fork! Already found one of these in another Vifon bowl a while back.

Here’s some powdered seasoning.

Very light powder.

Veggie packet.

Onions and such.

A retort pouch! I’m really curious how this will go here. .. Well, only one way to find out!

Finished (click image to enlarge). So these noodles – they have to be the broadest rice noodles I’ve ever seen – pretty amazing that they stay together being so wide and thin! They’re not too chewy and no mushy either. The broth is very interesting – kind of salty and kind of buttery – but absolutely not fishy. It’s got a thickness to it – not an overly greasy kind of thickness either. Lots of green onion bits here and there – they look nice and maybe add a little flavor to the broth. The Basa fish? Well, there’s not a huge amount of it but it’s good – not really fishy at all – like a whitefish. I will say that I do like Vietnamese catfish instant noodles! Unique, different and pretty good! 3.75 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 8934561260325 – get it here!

This is how I react when I see Asian groceries…

An informational video about Vietnamese catfish farming

#402: Sau Tao (Thick) Instant Noodle King Scallop Soup Flavor

I think this is the last of the Sau Tao’s I have for reviewing at this point. This one’s Scallop flavor with thick noodles. Again, these noodles aren’t fried. If you notice to the upper right of center, you are being informed that ‘Health is important.’ Looks like 4g fat and 7.5g fiber – not too bad actually.

So here we go with the packets. I really enjoy the look of the powder packet – the one at the far left. It’s got that old Asian product look that really draws me to the noodles in the first place. Next is a clear packet of seasoned oil. This packet might often be cloudy because the temperature would be cooler. The last is the veggies and other stuff packet, a good sized one.

An interesting melange of colors going on here… Those noodles are real weird looking are they not?

Click image to enlarge. As is my constant behoove, I added one fried egg. I see fried eggs in all sorts of instant noodles from every part of Asia. Breaking a soft yolk really makes the broth more accommodating and relaxing to the palate, like a fleece blanket. The noodles, healthy as they are, are kind of lacking. I think frying them gives an extra bit of flavor and texture that these don’t have. The broth was extremely thin, and I would recommend using a little less water than the directions call for – maybe just fill it a tad below the line. The winner here were the veggies. They re hydrated nicely and were delicious. It all came together decently, but wasn’t anything really exceptional. 3.0 out of 5.0 stars.

NOTE: This one did come with a fork but I’ve done a Sau Tao fork update already.

It didn’t make me deflate.

When I grew up, I lived very close to the Canadian border, so I saw a lot of Canadian kids’ shows. Here’s a few…

#198: Shirakiku Sanukiya Somen Fresh Japanese Style Original

Some fresh noodles. Some this time – I know Udon, but what it somen? Wikipedia says:

Sōmen (?) are very thin, white Japanesenoodles made of wheat flour. The noodles are usually served cold and are less than 1.3 mm in diameter. The distinction between sōmen and the next thicker wheat noodles hiyamugi and even thicker Japanese wheat noodles udon is mostly the size of the noodle. Somen noodles are stretched when made, as are some types of udon noodles.

Sōmen are usually served cold with a light flavored dipping sauce or tsuyu. The tsuyu is usually a katsuobushi-based sauce that can be flavored with Welsh onion, ginger, or myoga. In the summer, sōmen chilled with ice is a popular meal to help stay cool.

So same stuff as the udon, just skinnier noodles. Also these aren’t server cold, by the way.

As you can see, the noodles are indeed thinner. A couple tasty packets awaiting dump into…

The bowl. Eveything in and a bath of water. 5 minutes in the microwave? Wow!

Click image to enlarge. Here we are – piping hot noodles and soup. So initially when I took this stuff out of the microwave, I was hit with a strong smell of seaweed. I did some stirring and noticed that there was a nice plentiful amount of it in the bowl. Upon letting it cool, I started in on it, first the noodles. Not chewy at all but very nice texture. The seaweed blended into it, lending itself to a more flavorful nosh. I found myself sipping the soup then going to noodles alternatively; it was natural and was enjoyable. I complain about the lack of ingredients and simple nature of packs of noodles quite often as boring and unimaginative., Here we have simple and elegant; the other side of the spectrum. I found this to be qui8te good and would definitely enjoy this again and recommend it to others. I give it a 4.25 out of 5.0 stars. Get it here.

#167: Wai Wai Crab Flavour Instant Rice Vermicelli

So Wai Wai not some of this stuff today eh? Crab flavour. Haven’t eaten a whole lot of crab in my life. Curious how it will taste…

Three packets. Today the hot pepper powder is going to take a break. Wanna taste this one…

So we have some powder and some oil. Should be interesting I think…

Click image to enlarge. These are some super-thin noodles! I mean SUPER THIN! It is rice vermicelli, but jeez! Very salty broth. I think perhaps a bit of a crab flavor? Not really sure. I’m not really impressed but not put off and found this stuff pretty average. So, 2.5 out of 5.0 stars.