Tag Archives: karashi

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Here’s another one I found in Taiwan on my trip in November of 2016. Yakisoba is one of my favorites – and my wife Kit likes it quite a bit as well. As I’ve said before, I’m usually quite a few reviews ahead as normally I do two reviews a day but only post one. Right now It’s February 20th, 2017 and our new President Trump has only been in office for a month. I have to assure my friends from all over the world that indeed not all of us are rude and boorish as he is and respect other people’s rights. That being said, let’s talk more about this one!

This is a yaki soba with mentaiko and mentaiko flavored mayo. Here’s some info from Wikipedia about mentaiko:

Pollock roe, the salted roe of Alaska pollock, is a popular culinary ingredient in Japan, Korea, and Russia. In Korea, the roe of Alaska pollock is traditionally called myeongnan (명란), and the salted roe is called myeongnanjeot (명란젓). The food was introduced to Japan after World War II, and is called mentaiko (明太子) in Japanese. The milder, less spicy version is called tarako (鱈子) in Japan. In Russian, it is called ikra mintaya (икра минтая).

Yessir – fish eggs! They’re pretty common in Japanese foods. They’re bright and colorful and I like ’em! So let’s check out this mentaiko flavor instant yakisoba!

Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor – Japan

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Detail of the side and bottom of the package (click to enlarge).

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge). Contains fish products. To prepare, open tab 1 to dotted line marked 2. Remove sachets. Add boiling water to line and close for 3 minutes. Open tab 3 to expose drain spout and drain. Add in sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The noodle block.

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Some loose pieces in the tray.

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

A liquid sachet.

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Definitely yakisoba sauce.

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

A dry sachet.

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The mentaiko.

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The mentaiko taste karashi mayo.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion and Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts. The noodles have a nice chew and the sheer amount of them is pretty impressive. They have a nice slaty and oily taste with a bit of mentaiko throughout. The karashi masyo with mentaiko flavor is really good – also lubes up the noodles a little more. 4.5 out of 5.0 stars.  JAN bar code 4902881436137.

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

MYOJO IPPEI-CHAN YOMISE YAKISOBA INSTANT NOODLE CASE [12pcs] by Myojo

A vintage Myojo TV commercial for Yakisoba Jumbo.

#904: Myojo Ippei-chan Yomise-No Yakisoba Oriental Style With Mayonnaise 一平ちゃん

Here’s a new one we got at Uwajimaya. This looks really good! Nothing says tasty like a little bit of Japanese mayonnaise! Let’s check it out!

Here are close-ups of the text on top, the side and the bottom (click to enlarge).

Here’s the lid (click to enlarge). Notice the top left has a pour spout!

The noodle block – big and rectangular.

Here’s the front and back of the yakisoba sauce packet.

A good sized veggie packet.

Looks like some niceties like cabbage and other tasty bits.

Spice packet?

Interesting; I expected chili powder but I taste seaweed and sesame seed.

Here we go! A mayonnaise packet! You can get all artsy with this one – use scissors and cut off a corner to get a thin stream.

Finished (click to enlarge).  Added stir-fry vegetables, some baked chicken with Lindberg-Snider Red Baron BBQ Spice, kizami shoga (pickled ginger) and Urashima Sesame & Salt furikake. The noodles were really nice – floffy and almost buttery. The yakisoba sauce really makes it all quite tasty and the mayonnaise is really a nice addition – adds a bit of interesting comfort food notion. The vegetables were good – primarily cabbage, but it was crunchy! Good stuff – 4.75 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 011152219875 .

What an awesome commercial – squeezing the mayonnaise packets!

A nice little sampling of Japanese commercials from the mid 90’s.

#392: Nissin Yakisoba Noodles Karashi Flavor

I have to say, when I see a box like this with any kind of mayonnaise-like stuff going on, I get really hungry!

Click image to enlarge. So what you do is peel it back, yank the packets out, fill with boiling water, wait, then on the top left there’s a spout which opens up and you drain via that.

So the little top packet is the goopy stuff and the bottom one is the powder base.

After the noodles were drained, you put the powder on and stir vigorously.

Click image to enlarge. Finally, you decorate the meal with the mayonnaise packet. So there’s a little cabbage which re-hydrates perfectly. The noodles are just awesome with the flavoring. Slap that little bit of wasabi infused mayonnaise on top and you’ve got a winner. I love this kind of thing! 5.0 out of 5.0 stars!

Konichi-wa! Frances ix the man!

Yeah I’ve eaten this before

#244: Nissin Karashi Mayonnaise Flavor Yakisoba Pan-Fried Noodles

So look upon this with awe and silent adoration. Mayonnaise flavor noodles. Mayonnaise on the noodles. Mayonnaise. It’s just so amazing. This one is using something called Karashi Mayo.  Wikipedia says lends  some light to this situation…

Karashi (芥子, 辛子, からし, or カラシ?) is a type of mustard used as a condiment or as a seasoning in Japanese cuisine. Karashi is made from the crushed seeds of Brassica juncea. Karashi is usually sold in powder form or paste form in tubes. Karashi in powder form is prepared for use by mixing with lukewarm water to a paste and leaving it covered for a few minutes.[1]Karashi is often served with tonkatsu, oden, natto, and shumai.[2]Karashi can be used as part of a dipping sauce when mixed with mayonnaise, called karashi mayonnaise or with vinegar and miso, called karashi su miso.[3] It is also used to make pickledjapanese eggplant, called karashi-nasu.[4]

So it’s a mayo infused with some karashi. Sounds good – on! on!

Click image to enlarge. Very straightforward instructions – hot water, spout, packets out, yes yes…

The top is a nice little packet of the karashi mayo and the lower is powdered yakisoba sauce.

Finished noodles and the soba sauce powder on top awaiting a vigorous stir.

Click image to enlarge. Well there you have it – maybe not as perfect as on the package but a reasonably successful attempt. So how is it? Oh, it’s freaking awesome! Kind of like wasabi mayo. The noodles are great too and the veggies are nice. One thing though – I wish the noodles were a slight bit chewier. But other than that, bravo Nissin, thank you for this flavorful indulgence – 4.75 out of 5.0 stars!