Tag Archives: cbp

Re-Review: Indomie Mi Instan Rasa Mi Cakalang

Of the re-reviews I’ve done recently, I would say this is one of the most recent. Here’s the link for it’s first review, #858. Cakalang is also known as Skipjack tuna.

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Finished (click to enlarge). I added some sweet onion, a fried egg with some Krazy Mixed Up Salt and Dua Belibis chili sauce. This stuff packs from heat! The noodles are your standard Indomie – nice texture and spring. The broth is spicy and has a nice tuna flavor along. There was a packet of garnish, which was dried tuna bits and was quite tasty. I like this a lot! 4.5 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 08968604302 .

This is about Indonesian musical intruments – very cool!

Here’s what happens when you have musicians playing!

#901: Sarimi Rasa Ayam Bawang

Here’s the next to last of the packs that my friend from Jakarta, Indonesia sent. Hate to see them running out – so good! This one’s onion chicken flavor. Let’s check it out!

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge).

Here’s some of the noodle block.

Here’s the dry seasoning packets – chili powder and powder base.

Here is the chili powder atop the powder base.

Here’s the seasoned oil packet.

Has a nice aroma – chicken and onion.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added some broccoli, turkey breast, hard boiled egg with Krazy Mixed Up Salt, some Dua Belibis chili sauce and a little of the new Urashima Sesame & Salt furikake. The noodles are pretty good – nothing to write home about but nice. The broth was excellent – nice color, great onion and chicken taste with a little spicy hit from the chili powder. Good stuff! 3.5 out of 5.0 stars! UPC bar code 089686017076 .

Here’s a commercial for Sarimi instant noodles during Ramadhan.

Elly Kasim – Ayam Den Lapeh

#867: Indomie Mi Instan Rasa Coto Makassar

This is a real treat – this is one of the varieties not available in the United States and was kindly sent by Edwin N. of Vancouver, BC! Thank you again so much! So what is Coto Makassar anyways? Well, here’s something I found here:

Coto? Nope, I am not misspelled the word to Soto (popular Indonesian dishes). Its a local name for the traditional food from South Sulawesi, a soup that consist of meat, specifically the innards of cow, and mixed with spices like galangal and pepper. Galangal is also known as Blue ginger, Alpinia galanga, or lengkuas in Indonesian name.

Makassar in the name refers to the capital city of South Sulawesi, where this unique dishes is very popular as the local traditional food.

Wikipedia says:

Coto Makassar or Coto Mangkasara (Makassarese), is an Indonesian culinary food originating from Makassar, South Sulawesi. It is a soup with seasoning broth made from starch.[1] The main content of this soup is beef and it can be mixed with innards such as intestine, liver, lungs, heart, tripe, or cow brain.[2]

Coto Makassar is usually served with Burasa or Ketupat.

Soup’s on – let’s try it!

Was very hard to read – black deep red – so I used some Photoshop magic to make it easier. Click to enlarge.

The noodle block.

Dry seasoning powder and chili powder.

Dark colored chunky base with the chili powder on top.

Seasoning oil packet.

Curious – smells kind of like peanut butter.

Fried onion!

Nothing better than a little fried onion on top!

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added some grocery store frozen stir-fry veggies, a hard boiled egg with Krazy Mixed Up Salt and some Dua Belibis. Noodles are good and work well in soup. Nice texture. The broth Has a very deep and dark color. Has a spicy and a funky beef taste – kind of a spicy vegetable beef kind of thing going on. Good stuff. 4.0 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 089686043051 .

Short film showing the preparation of Coto Makassar.

This is one bizarre documentary – “Heavy Metal Parking Lot” – Judas Priest fans in a parking lot at a show in 1986 – quite interesting.

#858: Indomie Mi Instan Rasa Mi Cakalang

Haven’t had an Indomie in a while! This one’s Cakalang. Cakalang is also known as Skipjack tuna. Been looking forward to this.

Back of the packaging. Anybody know if that mention of Indomie Kreasi – just a recipe or another product altogether? Click to enlarge.

The noodle block.

Powdered base and chili powder.

Here’s the chili atop of the seasoning powder.

You guessed it – seasoned oil!

A little bit of color.

What’s this?

Powdered tuna!

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added onion, red bell pepper, broccoli, and a fried egg with Dua Belibis and Krazy Mixed Up Salt. The noodles are good – chewier than usual Indomie – and good! The broth is spicy and has a unique seafood taste. This is great stuff! 4.5 out of 5.0 stars – excellent Indomie! UPC bar code 08968604302 .

Indomie 40th Anniversary video.

Indonesian currency!

#740: Indomie Mi Instan Mi Goreng Sate

Here’s a good one – this is the Indnesian local version of the first Indomie I ever tried – Satay. Curious if it’s any different.

Back of the package (click image to enlarge).

Noodles ready to be made tasty!

Seasoning powder on the left, chili powder on the right.

Here they are together.

The triple packet of wonder! From left to right: hot, sweet chili sauce, sweet soy sauce and fried onions.

This stuff is really good and you can get it in a big bottle at most Asian groceries – looks for Manis Pedas!

This is a really thick and sweet soy sauce – again an easy one to find but usually comes in a really big bottle. Luckily, it’s usually quite cheap. Look for Kecap Manis.

The fried onion is sprinkled on top and finishes it all nicely.

Finished (click image to enlarge). I added some corned beef, a little vegetable mix, a fried egg, a little kizami shoga (pickled ginger) and a touch of Krazy Mixed Up Salt. So according to the interview, I think this would qualify as ‘INTERNET.’ The noodles are awesome! They grab the flavorings so well and the taste is divine – although it’s a little sweeter than I remember. There is a tiny bit of heat though – it’s really quite excellent. The fried onions give it a really nice little crunch. I love this stuff – 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.  UPC bar code 089686011005 – get the US version here.

This looks really good – and it’s portable!

I’ve tried these things in the past – they have them here in the US at big Asian supermarkets.

#730: Meet The Manufacturer: Indomie Mi Instan Rasa Soto Banjar Limau Kuit Khas Kalimantan Selatan

Okay so here’s another soup – Soto Banjar. First off, here’s what Wikipedia says about Soto:

Soto, sroto, tauto or coto is a common dish, found in many regional variations of Indonesian cuisine. It is a traditional soup mainly composed of broth, meat and vegetables. There is no clear definition of what makes a soto, but normally many traditional soups are called soto, whereas foreign and Western influenced soups are called sop. Soto is sometimes considered Indonesia’s national dish, as it is served from Sumatra to Papua, in a wide range of variations. Soto is omnipresent in Indonesia, available in many an open-air eateries and on many street corners to fine dining restaurants and luxurious hotels.[1] Soto, especially soto ayam (chicken soto), is considered as Indonesian counterpart of chicken soup. Soto is a comforting soup,[2] because it is always served warm with tender texture in most of Indonesian households, and naturally considered as Indonesian comfort food.[3][4]

But what about the Banjar variety?

Banjar soto, spiced with star anise, clove, cassia and lemongrass and sour hot sambal, accompanied with potato cakes.

So this is a type of Indonesian soup from the capitol of South Kalimantan. Let’s give it a try!

Here’s the back of the packaging (click image to enlarge).

The noodle block is ready to absorb and assimilate liquid!

Our regular dry packets – dry powder on the left and chili powder on the right.

Here’s the seasoning powder and a little chili powder in the middle.

The liquids and garnish. Seasoned oil, kecap manis (sweet soy sauce) and fried onions.

A lighter colored oil – often these have been a cream color or a darker color. This one’s a little lighter and more transparent.

Thick, black and sweet, the soy sauce gives a nice sugary taste. Raw, it’s a bit like molasses.

Fried onions go on at the very end on top of everything.

Solid ingredients packet. What’s inside?

This reminds me of what’s in the Special versions that are sold in the US. It’s a veggie mix.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added a hard boiled egg with some Krazy Mixed Up Salt and some pepper, a little Kizami Shoga (pickled ginger) and some of my stir-fry mix made from veggies we got at Country Farms. Oh and a little chicken lunch meat. This was absolutely exquisite! The noodles are great and the broth has a sweet, spicy and deep flavor – this is great stuff! Hints of cinnamon and spices are rampant – this is really enjoyable! Perfect – 5.0 out of 5.0 stars – best Indomie soup I’ve tried yet! UPC bar code 089686011692 .

Floating market in Banjar!

This group, Nasida Ria, was in a compilation of Indonesian music.