Tag Archives: yamachan

#3244: Yamachan Ramen Z Miso Flavor Ramen – United States

#3244: Yamachan Ramen Z Miso Flavor Ramen - United States

So when Yamachan contacted me about a gluten free ramen, I was interested. Really? How does that work? Well, only one way to find out! One thing is these are konyak noodles. I’ve had thick gauge konyak and really disliked it. I have to admit though seeing the gauge of these I’ve got hope. Let’s check it out!

Yamachan Ramen Z Miso Flavor Ramen – United States

#3244: Yamachan Ramen Z Miso Flavor Ramen - United States

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). To prepare, rinse noodles. Add noodles and miso paste to 6oz of water and microwave 3 minutes. Finally, sir and enjoy!

#3244: Yamachan Ramen Z Miso Flavor Ramen - United States

One of two servings of noodles.

#3244: Yamachan Ramen Z Miso Flavor Ramen - United States

One of two wet sachets.

#3244: Yamachan Ramen Z Miso Flavor Ramen - United States

Miso soup base.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added soft egg, Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, spring onion, black sesame seeds, and habanero togarashi. The noodles are indeed unique. The gauge definitely works for this style though; while they have a gummy kind of texture, it works with the broth. The miso broth is strong and tasty which I enjoyed. Couple that with a 136 calorie per reasonably sized serving size too. I was surprised how much I liked this. 3.75 out of 5.0 stars.  UPC bar code 767921033608.

#3244: Yamachan Ramen Z Miso Flavor Ramen - United States

Gluten Free Ramen Z Sapporo style Miso soup flavor (shirataki, ramen noodles, pasta, chowmein), 7 oz -3 pags (2 servings in each bag)

Watch me cook on Instant Noodle Recipe Time!

Gluten-Free Japanese Ramen?! | Unboxing Time

gluten free jpanese ramen japan yamachan ramen z

In all the years of reviewing I’ve done, I’ve never seen a gluten-free ramen. Sure, I’ve seen rice noodles which generally are gluten free, but this is entirely different. Let’s take a first look at Ramen Z.

Gluten-Free Japanese Ramen?! – United States

#2569: Yamachan Yokohama Tonkotsu Shoyu

#2569: Yamachan Yokohama Tonkotsu Shoyu - Japan - The Ramen Rater

So this is the last of the three fresh varieties sent to me by Yamachan – thank you again! First off, Yamachan is pretty easily found in the United States – I’ve not only seen their products in Japanese/Asian supermarkets but at higher-end domestic grocery stores. Here’s a little from Wikipedia on Tonkotsu and Shoyu Ramen –

Shōyu (醤油, “soy sauce”) ramen is the oldest of the five, it has a clear brown broth, based on a chicken and vegetable (or sometimes fish or beef) stock with plenty of soy sauce added resulting in a soup that is tangy, salty, and savory yet still fairly light on the palate. Shōyu ramen usually has curly noodles rather than straight ones, but this is not always the case. It is often adorned with marinated bamboo shoots or menma, green onions, kamaboko(fish cakes), nori (seaweed), boiled eggs, bean sprouts or black pepper; occasionally the soup will also contain chili oil or Chinese spices, and some shops serve sliced beef instead of the usual chāshū.

Tonkotsu ramen is a ramen dish that originated in FukuokaFukuoka Prefecture on the Kyushu island of Japan, and it is a specialty dish in Fukuoka and Kyushu. It was originally prepared as an affordable fast food for laborers at fish markets. Today, it is renowned for the significant time it can take to properly prepare the dish. The soup broth is based upon pork bones and other ingredients, which is typically boiled for several hours, and the dish is traditionally served with ramen noodles that are hard in the center and topped with sliced pork belly. In Fukuoka, Japan, tonkotsu ramen is referred to as Hakata ramen.

Alrighty – let’s check out this third and final new variety from Yamachan!

Yamachan Yokohama Tonkotsu Shoyu – United States

#2569: Yamachan Yokohama Tonkotsu Shoyu - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains pork and chicken. To prepare, boil noodles in 800ml water for 3 minutes and drain. While boiling, combine sachet with 300ml boiling water and stir in. Finally, add noodles to a bowl and pour broth over them – slurp and enjoy!

#2569: Yamachan Yokohama Tonkotsu Shoyu - Japan - The Ramen Rater

The noodles – two servings in this pack.

#2569: Yamachan Yokohama Tonkotsu Shoyu - Japan - The Ramen Rater

The soup base.

#2569: Yamachan Yokohama Tonkotsu Shoyu - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Definitely looks like a mashup of shoyu and tonkotsu.

#2569: Yamachan Yokohama Tonkotsu Shoyu - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, egg, spring onion and chashu pork. The noodles are thicker than the other varieties it seems and very good. They have a nice gauge and chewiness to them. The broth is salty with a strong tonkotsu flavor. It’s complemented by the shoyu taste as well – and very rich. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 767921011316.

Yokohama Yankee: My Family’s Five Generations as Outsiders in Japan

A short video about Yokohama, Japan

#2557: Yamachan Sapporo Miso Ramen

#2557: Yamachan Sapporo Miso Ramen - United States - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - shirakiku

I contacted Yamachan a couple of weeks ago and they had new varieties for me to review! I did a Meet The Manufacturer with them a long time ago and their stuff is really great. Let’s see what Wikipedia has to say about miso –

Miso ramen is a relative newcomer, having reached national prominence around 1965. This uniquely Japanese ramen, which was developed in Hokkaido, features a broth that combines copious amounts of miso and is blended with oily chicken or fish broth – and sometimes with tonkotsu or lard – to create a thick, nutty, slightly sweet and very hearty soup. Miso ramen broth tends to have a robust, tangy flavor, so it stands up to a variety of flavorful toppings: spicy bean paste or tōbanjan (豆瓣醤), butter and corn, leeks, onions, bean sprouts, ground pork, cabbage, sesame seeds, white pepper, and chopped garlic are common. The noodles are typically thick, curly, and slightly chewy.

So let’s give this new variety from Yamachan a try!

Yamachan Sapporo Miso Ramen – United States

#2557: Yamachan Sapporo Miso Ramen - United States - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - shirakiku

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge) Contains pork and chicken. To prepare, add one of the noodle packs to 800ml boiling water and cook for 2 minutes. In a separate pot, add base to 300ml boiling water. Drain noodles and add to a bowl. Pour on soup and enjoy!

#2557: Yamachan Sapporo Miso Ramen - United States - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - shirakiku

One of the noodle packs.

#2557: Yamachan Sapporo Miso Ramen - United States - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - shirakiku

The soup base.

#2557: Yamachan Sapporo Miso Ramen - United States - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - shirakiku

Seriously thick!

#2557: Yamachan Sapporo Miso Ramen - United States - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - shirakiku

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, chashu pork, spring onion and shichimi togarashi. The noodles are great – very premium with a good hearty chew. The broth is indeed very rich and strong but not overly salty or anything like that. This is a delicious bowl of miso ramen. 4.75 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 767921011217.

#2557: Yamachan Sapporo Miso Ramen - United States - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles - shirakiku

The Book of Miso

Anthony Bourdain in Sapporo, Japan

#2563: Yamachan Tokyo Shoyu Ramen

#2563: Yamachan Tokyo Shoyu Ramen - Japanese - The Ramen Rater - United States - style oriental original noodle instant

Here’s another fresh variety from Yamachan. Yamachan’s in Southern California. So this is a fresh noodle (must be refrigerated) and is a shoyu variety. Shoyu translated to soy sauce, but it’s definitely not just a soy sauce flavor. Here’s a little from Wikipedia on Shoyu style ramen:

Ramen (/ˈrɑːmən/) (ラーメン rāmen, IPA: [ɾaꜜːmeɴ]) is a Japanese dish. It consists of Chinese-style wheat noodles served in a meat or (occasionally) fish-based broth, often flavored with soy sauce or miso, and uses toppings such as sliced pork (チャーシュー chāshū), dried seaweed (海苔 nori), menma (メンマ menma), and green onions ( negi). Nearly every region in Japan has its own variation of ramen, from the tonkotsu (pork bone broth) ramen of Kyushu to the miso ramen of Hokkaido.

Shōyu (醤油, “soy sauce”) ramen is the oldest of the five, it has a clear brown broth, based on a chicken and vegetable (or sometimes fish or beef) stock with plenty of soy sauce added resulting in a soup that is tangy, salty, and savory yet still fairly light on the palate. Shōyu ramen usually has curly noodles rather than straight ones, but this is not always the case. It is often adorned with marinated bamboo shoots or menma, green onions, kamaboko (fish cakes), nori (seaweed), boiled eggs, bean sprouts or black pepper; occasionally the soup will also contain chili oil or Chinese spices, and some shops serve sliced beef instead of the usual chāshū.

These packs from Yamachan have two servings. Let’s check this Shoyu variety out!

Yamachan Tokyo Shoyu Ramen – United States

#2563: Yamachan Tokyo Shoyu Ramen - Japanese - The Ramen Rater - United States - style oriental original noodle instant

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains fish. To prepare, add noodle pouch to 800ml boiling water and cook for 1 minute. Add soup base sachet contents to 300ml boiling water. Drain noodles and add to bowl. Finally, add soup to bowl and enjoy!

#2563: Yamachan Tokyo Shoyu Ramen - Japanese - The Ramen Rater - United States - style oriental original noodle instant

The fresh noodle pouches.

#2563: Yamachan Tokyo Shoyu Ramen - Japanese - The Ramen Rater - United States - style oriental original noodle instant

The soup base sachets.

#2563: Yamachan Tokyo Shoyu Ramen - Japanese - The Ramen Rater - United States - style oriental original noodle instant

Thick base!

Finished (click to enlarge). Added chashu pork, Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, spring onion and shichimi togarashi. The noodles are very premium and fresh. Great gauge and chew – good quantity as well. The broth is indeed rich and very hearty. It has the right amount of shoyu and a little hint of bonito in the background. Excellent! 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 767921011118.

#2563: Yamachan Tokyo Shoyu Ramen - Japanese - The Ramen Rater - United States - style oriental original noodle instant

Japanese 8.25″ Diameter Fu-Un Ceramic Donburi Ramen Noodle Udon Rice Bowl

How soy sauce is made

#936: Yamachan Tonkotsu Ramen Mild Pork Flavor Soup Base

I did a Meet The Manufacturer on Yamachan a little while back and found their products to be quite good! Here’s a new one they’ve come out with – a mild Tonkotsu! Sounds excellent! Thanks to the folks at Yamachan in San Jose, California for sending this! Now, to the review!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge).

The noodle blocks, although they’re not very blocky! Fresh and nice looking!

Here’s the soup base.

They also sent bamboo shoots, aka ‘menma.’ Click image to enlarge.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added sweet onions, thinly sliced ham, minced garlic, hard boiled egg, kizami shoga (pickled ginger, menma, and Urashima Sesame & Salt furikake. The noodles are very nice – a little chewy and firm of backbone but gentle and giving as well. The broth is extremely good. Strong notes of pork and a very comforting flavor makes the noodle and broth pair exquisite., This is wonderful stuff – go find it (I’ve seen Yamachan products it in the cold case at 99 Ranch Market as well as Uwajimaya in the Seattle area)! 5.0 out of 5.0 stars! UPC bar code 767921019305 .

How to make and share Yamachan ramen!

Drumming at a Japanese festival in San Jose, California – lot of stamina to do this stuff!

Meet The Manufacturer #889: Yamachan Ramen Rich Shoyu Ramen

This is the last of the samples I got from Yamachan Ramen! Must admit I’m sad to see them go! Very tasty fare and it’s been a lot of fun! This one’s shoyu. Let’s give it a try.

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge).

Here are the bags of fresh ramen noodles.

The soup base.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added broccoli, yellow onion, green bell pepper, turkey breast, hard boiled egg, kizami shoga (pickled ginger), green onions and Ajishima Kimchi furikake. The noodles are nice – chewy and fresh. The broth is pretty good – has a strong soy taste but also a bitterness and a sweetness – as lot going on there. Good stuff! 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.UPC bar code 767921011101 .

A neat video on how they demo the mild Yamachan Ramen varieties at a grocery store.

How to make Yakibuta Ramen – this is classic!

Meet The Manufacturer #888: Yamachan Ramen Nagasaki Sara Udon Chicken Flavor

Here’s something different. Sara Udon means plate noodles – what you have is a crispy noodle that is thin. You put them on the plate and crush gently, then add the sauce and during the meal, the noodles go from crisp to soft. It’s a texture sensation! Well, let’s check it out!

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Notice the directions.

Here are the noodles. Like big nests of thin noodles.

Here are the packets of liquid seasoning.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added yellow onion, broccoli, green bell pepper, chicken, green onion and Ajishima Kimchi furikake. The noodles are of a very interesting nature; when they don’t have sauce on them, they are crunchy. When they do, they absorb the liquid and become increasingly soggy – in a good way! The sauce is a slightly thick lightly chicken flavored concoction. The flavor is very nice – definitely not too salty at all and really tasty. This is a uniquely Japanese dish that evolves as you eat it – from crisp to soft noodle texture. Loved this one – 4.25 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 767921016809 .

Yamachan Ramen factory!

This guy looks pretty happy!

Meet The Manufacturer #887: Yamachan Ramen Cold Noodles With Lemon Soy Dressing

I’ve had a few cold noodle varieties from South Korean manufacturers, but never any Japanese cold noodles. Let’s have a look at this one!

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Notice the different cooking instructions.

The noodle blocks.

This is the dressing; you don’t dilute it.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added green bell pepper, yellow onion, broccoli, green onion, oven baked chicken, hard boiled egg and Ajishima Kimchi furikake. The noodles are just as good cold as hot – they are nice and fresh and chewy and wonderful. The dressing is very delicate and light. It goes very well – has a light lemon taste which is nice. Good stuff! 4.0 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 767921019404 .

The Yamachan Ramen noodle factory!

This looks really cool – I think I’ll see what my son thinks of it. He’s seen all of the Star Blazers (Space Battleship Yamato) and we’re checking out Robotech currently;y.

Meet The Manufacturer: Yamachan Ramen Samples

So Lifehacker came out with an article about The Ramen Rater a couple weeks ago and I noticed something about Yamachan Ramen in the comments on it. I contacted them and they were very interested in doing a Meet The Manufacturer. Very shortly, I received this box in the mail…

Seven fresh ramen varieties! Thanks again! Can’t wait to say I’ve tried them all!

Meet The Manufacturer: An Interview With Yamachan Ramen

Welcome one and all to another Meet The Manufacturer! This time it’s San Jose, CA based Yamachan Ramen!They make fresh ramen products – here’s the interview I did with them.

THE RAMEN RATER> Thank you very much for agreeing to do this interview! Could we start off with Some information about Yamachan; when was Yamachan founded, where and by who?

YAMACHAN RAMEN>Yamachan Ramen is a brand name for our retail products. Our company’s official name is Nippon Trends Food Services, Inc. (NTF for short), which was found by Mr. Hideyuki Yamashita (the president of the company-A.K.A Yamachan) in San Jose, CA in 2000.
The factory was originally built as a central kitchen for Japanese franchise restaurant Ringer Hut.co (http://www.ringerhut.co.jp).
Ringer Hut had a plan to open 100 restaurants in US late 90’s, but Ramen wasn’t popular (or unknown to the most of the people in US), so Ringer Hut, Co. only opened 2 restaurants and left the USA. (Although the company left here, their 1st restaurant is still in San Jose, CA www.ringerhutusa.com ). It was president of the Ringer Hut’s dream to introduce Japanese ramen noodles to US, so Mr. Yamashita stayed in US with his family to continue on manufacturing noodle products.

TRR> For those of my readers who are not familiar with your line of products, could
You tell us a little about them?
 
YR> We have several items in the market for customer’s needs.  Our products are not dried instant noodles that you see at the supermarket.
It takes few steps to make it but you can enjoy Ramen almost as well as you eat at restaurant.

For the basic ramen fans.
Yamachan Mild (regular) series-all soup base for these products are imported from Japan and contains no meat products in the soup base. (Some fish products in the base).
Shoyu (Soy sauce flavor)
Miso (Soy bean paste flavor)
Shio (Sea food flavor)
We also have Tonkotsu (pork and chicken) flavor. However, this product has been out of the market for almost a year but it will be back in the market soon. Tonkotsu Ramen series contains Chicken and pork in the soup base and it is made in US.
Yamachan Noukou (Richer flavor) series-all soup base for these products are imported from Japan and no meat products in the soup base. (Some fish products in it). Noodles for Noukou series are made from premium Japanese flour.
Noukou Shoyu (Soy sauce flavor)
Noukou Miso (Soy bean paste flavor)
Noukou Tonkotsu Shoyu (Soy sauce, pork and chicken flavor)
Yamachan NO MSG series
No MSG Shoyu (Soy sauce with chicken flavor soup base)
No MSG Miso (Soy bean paste with fish flavor sauce)
No MSG HIYASHI CHUKA (cold salad noodle- Lemmon soy flavor)
No MSG Sarandon (Crispy noodle- with chicken flavor gravy)

We also sell Menma (bamboo shoots) and restaurant size (1kg) soup base,

TRR> What does the name ‘Yamachan’ mean?

YR> Yamachan is a nickname for Mr. Yamashita’s last name. The character of the man with on the package is Yamachan.

TRR> Is Yamachan involved in the local community around you?

YR> Yes. We do donate our products to local Japanese community events or school charity.
Also Mr. Yamashita goes to cook at Japanese community events every summer.

TRR> Are there any new products that will be coming out soon that you could tell us about?

YR> Shio (Sea food flavor) just came out about 6 months ago.
Our Tonkotsu Ramen will be back to the market in November.
We are also developing allergy free, egg free, no gluten ramen.

TRR> A lot of people wonder about the health factors (sodium, etc.) when it comes to instant noodles. How do you recommend people made instant noodles a healthy part of their diet?

YR> Ramen soup is well known to have MSG in it. We offer No MSG retail products for the customers who are concerned about MGS products.
Also ramen soup contains a lot of sodium but if you only have 1/2 of the soup, your sodium you will only have 1/2 of the sodium.
Try to eat fresh/ locally instant noodles like Yamachan ramen.

TRR> Do you make/sell products other than instant noodles?

YR> Our main business is to manufacture noodles to restaurant. (80% of our products go to Japanese restaurants)
We offer variety of noodles, which includes organic, no preservatives, vegan, egg free. Etc.…
We also manufacture crispy noodles, Pot sticker skins, Udon, Buckwheat noodles…. etc.

TRR> What was your first product?

YR> Yamachan Shoyu ramen and miso ramen.

TRR> How does the process in which you make your noodles differ from other brands?

YR> We made the noodles just like the factory in Japan.
Our machines are from Japan and flour is milled by Japanese technique, and we go Japan to find the best soup that matches to our noodles.
We design noodles for customer’s need (Thickness, weights, recipe)

TRR> When you make instant noodles for yourself, do you add anything or have any recommendations?

YR> You can add anything. Regular ramen put green onions, Chashu (Braised Pork), a halt cooked egg, bamboo s
I think for topping wise, you can put anything you want to. I like to put small chopped raw onions on Noukou Tonkotsu Shoyu Ramen.
The best way to cook them is to FOLLOW the cooking instruction on the package. Use cooking timer and measuring cup to make exactly how to cook. That is the best way.
You can check how to make Chashu and a half cooked eggs at  This page.

TRR> Where can people find your products?

YR> Most of the Asian supermarket nears you. If you cannot find them, please contact us via website.

TRR> Thank you very much for this opportunity to learn more about Yamachan Ramen!

Meet The Manufacturer Yamachan Ramen Reviews: Interview * Yamachan Ramen Samples * Yamachan Shio Ramen Seafood Clear Soup Base Mild * Yamachan Miso Ramen – Mild * Yamachan Miso Ramen Rich Sapporo Miso * Yamachan Tonkotsu-Shoyu Rich Pork Ramen * Yamachan Ramen Cold Noodles With Lemon Soy Dressing * Yamachan Ramen Nagasaki Sara Udon Chicken Flavor * Yamachan Ramen Rich Shoyu Ramen

Meet The Manufacturer #885: Yamachan Miso Ramen Rich Sapporo Miso

So yesterday I tried the mild miso and today I’m hitting up the rich. This one says it’s ‘Sapporo miso’ – curious to see what its like.

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge).

The noodle portions come individually wrapped on a tray.

The miso packets.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added some onions, a hard boiled egg with some Krazy Mixed Up Salt and some baked chicken with Soul Seasoning and Ajishima Kimchi Furikake. The noodles are reaslly good – chewy and fresh. The broth was a surprise. I expected a really really strong miso flavor that would bowl me over. It’s exactly as mentioned on the package – rich. Broth is of a brown and almost milky color. The broth has an extremely nice depth to it and is really good. I was expecting a really salty and almost funky bitter taste which I did not get at all and I am happy about that. Serious depth of flavor – I like it. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars – this is excellence.  UPC bar code 767921011200 .

How to do product demos of Yamachan products. Basically, this guy’s a pro at makingh this stuff and so have a look to make sure you’re doing it right!

This is a Japanese cooking show called Dotch. They’re having a challeng: Onion Miso Ramen vs Salt Butter Ramen! I had no idea onion miso ramen was somewhat normal – I just like onions a lot and it sounded good.