Tag Archives: soto

Meet The Manufacturer: #2663: Alhami Instant Noodle Soto Flavor

Meet The Manufacturer: #2663: Alhami Instant Noodle Soto Flavor

I reviewed a Maitri Soto variety earlier in this series, and since Jonathan at Waroeng Jajanan gave me some Soto Betawi, I thought I ought to review the non-vegetarian version to take advantage of the niceties therein. Here’s a little about Soto from Wikipedia –

Soto (also known as srototauto, or coto) is a traditional Indonesian soup mainly composed of broth, meat and vegetables. Many traditional soups are called soto, whereas foreign and Western influenced soups are called sop.

Soto is sometimes considered Indonesia’s national dish, as it is served from Sumatra to Papua, in a wide range of variations. Soto is omnipresent in Indonesia, available in many warungs and open-air eateries on many street corners, to fine dining restaurants and luxurious hotels.[1] Soto, especially soto ayam (chicken soto), is an Indonesian equivalent of chicken soup. Because it is always served warm with a tender texture, it is considered an Indonesian comfort food.[2][3][4]

Because of the proximity and significant numbers of Indonesian migrants working and settling in neighbouring countries, soto can also be found in Singapore and Malaysia, and has become a part of their cuisine.

Introduced to Suriname by Javanese migrants, it is part of the national cuisine of that country as well, where it is spelled saoto.[5]

I’m really excited about this series – and the fact that I’m getting some help from a local business. Jonathan over at Waroeng Jajanan. The store and restaurant combo is just an amazing place to check out authentic Indonesian cuisine, and you’ll be seeing a lot of (pretty much all) that I add in the end being from there in this series. Alright – let’s check out this one from Alhami as part of Meet The Manufacturer!

Alhami Instant Noodle Soto Flavor – Indonesia

Meet The Manufacturer: #2663: Alhami Instant Noodle Soto Flavor

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add noodle block to 350ml boiling water and cook for 3 minutes. Add in sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

Meet The Manufacturer: #2663: Alhami Instant Noodle Soto Flavor

The noodle block.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2663: Alhami Instant Noodle Soto Flavor

A dual sachet.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2663: Alhami Instant Noodle Soto Flavor

Chilli powder atop the soup base.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2663: Alhami Instant Noodle Soto Flavor

A seasoned oil.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2663: Alhami Instant Noodle Soto Flavor

Has a lime scent.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2663: Alhami Instant Noodle Soto Flavor

Finished (click to enlarge). Added (prepared by Waroeng Jajanan) some of the chunky parts from their Soto Betawi, fried onion and (my own) Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts. The noodles have been as all of them in this series – familiar gauge and soft chew with a good quantity. The broth has a nice taste – hints of spiciness and a good slap of lime flavor. This was a highlight for me so far. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 034126939050.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2663: Alhami Instant Noodle Soto Flavor

A History of Modern Indonesia Since c. 1200: Fourth Edition

An advert for the Maitri line from Olagafood

Meet The Manufacturer: #2652: Maitri Vegetarian Rasa Soto

Meet The Manufacturer: #2652: Maitri Vegetarian Rasa Soto - Indonesia - The Ramen Rater

Another line from Olagafood is Maitri. All of these are vegetarian. Today we have some soto – let’s hit up Wikipedia about it –

Soto (also known as srototauto, or coto) is a traditional Indonesian soup mainly composed of broth, meat and vegetables. Many traditional soups are called soto, whereas foreign and Western influenced soups are called sop.

Soto is sometimes considered Indonesia’s national dish, as it is served from Sumatra to Papua, in a wide range of variations. Soto is omnipresent in Indonesia, available in many warungs and open-air eateries on many street corners, to fine dining restaurants and luxurious hotels.[1] Soto, especially soto ayam (chicken soto), is an Indonesian equivalent of chicken soup. Because it is always served warm with a tender texture, it is considered an Indonesian comfort food.[2][3][4]

What’s great is that I’m working with Jonathan over at Waroeng Jajanan. The store/restaurant has all things Indonesian, and he’s offered to sponsor this series with some garnishes and insight into what will make them even better. Let’s check this one out!

Maitri Vegetarian Rasa Soto – Indonesia

Meet The Manufacturer: #2652: Maitri Vegetarian Rasa Soto - Indonesia - The Ramen Rater

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add noodle block to 350ml boiling water and cook for 3 minutes. Add in sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

Meet The Manufacturer: #2652: Maitri Vegetarian Rasa Soto - Indonesia - The Ramen Rater

The noodle block.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2652: Maitri Vegetarian Rasa Soto - Indonesia - The Ramen Rater

A dual sachet.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2652: Maitri Vegetarian Rasa Soto - Indonesia - The Ramen Rater

Chilli powder atop seasoning base.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2652: Maitri Vegetarian Rasa Soto - Indonesia - The Ramen Rater

A liquid sachet.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2652: Maitri Vegetarian Rasa Soto - Indonesia - The Ramen Rater

A seasoned oil.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added (prepared by Waroeng Jajanan) Indonesian pickle, vegetable fritter, fried onion (my own) coriander. The noodles come out nicely – standard gauge with a light bouncy chew. The broth has a nice slightly lime hinted and beefy taste – very good for a vegetarian version. 4.25 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 034126937278.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2652: Maitri Vegetarian Rasa Soto - Indonesia - The Ramen Rater

A History of Modern Indonesia Since c. 1200: Fourth Edition

Olagafood at a food expo in 2016

Meet The Manufacturer: #1267: Mi ABC Mi Cup Rasa Soto Ayam Chicken Soto Flavour

Today, we come to the end of this Meet The Manufacturer. Fifteen reviews! Let’s have a look at this one.

The side panels (click image to enlarge). Color removed and darkened for easier reading. Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. Empty all sachets into the cup and add boiling water to the line for 3 minutes.

Detail of the lid (click image to enlarge).

I’ve got quite a few included forks now!

The noodle block.

Dry seasoning sachets – soup base on left and chilli powder on right.

Chilli powder atop the soup base.

Seasoning oil sachet.

Nice color.

Vegetable sachet.

Veggies and TVP (textured vegetable protein).

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added sauteed chicken with garlic salt. Noodles are light with a decent texture. The broth has a comfortable chicken flavor and nice hints of lime and onion. 3.75 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 8992388121045.

Here’s Soto Ayam – made on the streets of Jakarta!

#1230: Saji Sajimee Original Soto Soup Flavour (Mi Sup Soto Asli)

Here’s one I was sent by Annie T. over at MyKuali – thank you very much! I mentioned to her how I’d not reviewed many Malaysian varieties and she sent me a bunch of them! Pretty neat since MyKuali make instant noodles in Malaysia! Let’s check out this variety!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Looks to be meat-free but check for yourself. To make it, boil 350ml water and add the noodle block and cook for 3 minutes. Add contentds of the sachets, stir, and you’re done.

The noodle block.

The soup base sachet.

Has a nice star anise scent.

The veggie sachet.

Fried shallot – smells good!

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added sauteed beef, sweet onion and bell peppers as well as hard boiled egg with a little Jane’s Krazy Mixed Up Salt. The noodles are good – nice chew and pretty standard texture. The broth is very nice – has a strong star anise scent and taste which was very welcome as well as the hint of lime in there. Refreshing and comforting as well. 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.UPC bar code 9557561500032.

Here’s a Sajimee TV advertisement.

#1203: GaGa Mie Gepeng Kuah Rasa Soto Cabe Hijau

Another one that was sent from Indonesia – thank you! Soto varieties usually have a broth with them, rather than mi goreng which are dry. Cabe means chilli and hijau means green; so green chilli flavor noodle soup. Let’s check it out!

The back of the package (click image to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. Noodles in 350cc boiling water for 3 minutes, then mix with contents of the sachets.

The noodles traveled far and no here’s one of the larger chunks.

The dry seasoning sachet.

Has a rich scent.

Seasoned oil on left and green chilli paste on right.

The green chilli scent is strong.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added sweet onion, hard boiled egg, lime and baked chicken with Lindberg-Snider Red Baron BBQ seasoning. The noodles are of a wider gauge than your standard instant. They have a nice bounce to them and a good chew. The broth has a little green chilli flavor, a little chicken flavor and a little heat from other spices along with an onion flavor thrown in. The broth isn’t overly oily and tastes nice. 3.5 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 8888327831840.

A Mie Gepeng commercial.

#1161: GaGa 100 Green Chilli Soto Flavour

Here’s one that was sent to me by a reader in Jakarta, Indonesia – thank you! Spicy green chilli soup – green chilli seems to be gaining popularity in Indonesia. Let’s check it out!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Looks to be meat-free but check for yourself.

The noodle block.

A dual packet of soup base and chilli powder.

Here’s the chilli powder atop the soup base.

Green chilli sauce on the left and seasoned oil on the right.

Has a strong green chilli scent.

Seasoned oil.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added baked chicken with panko, Lindberg-Snider Red Baron BBq Seasoning and Mexcene, Walla Walla sweet onion, hard boiled egg and red, orange and yellow bell pepper. The noodles are plump and suck up lots of the broth’s flavor. The broth has of course the green chilli element, but the base, seasoned oil’s onions and regular red chilli powder’s elements retain their character separately as well. One thing that green chilli brings is heat – and not an overwhelmingly painful heat (probably for most but not for me) but one that intermingles with the other flavors. This is excellent. 3.75 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 8888327831123.

Here’s an advert for another GaGa product – mie Jepeng.

#876: Mi Instan Sarimi Soto Koya Pedasss

This one was sent by a friend in Jakarta, Indonesia – thank you! What a day – so around 11am, people started flooding into the site! LifeHacker ran a story about The Ramen Rater and literally thousand of people have checked out the blog. Well, here’s one from Indonesia – Soto Koya Pedass. Pedas means spicy, so I guess Pedass means really spicy or it could be a nod to Turturro in The Big Lebowski. I have a feeling it just means really spicy. I’ve seen this kind of thing before – extra letters = extra emphasis, at least in Indonesian. Well, let’s dig in to this one!

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge).

The noodle block.

The seasoning powder. Usually these are paired with a chili powder packet, but not this time.

A light powder.

Seasoned oil.

Quite a nice scent of citrus and spices.

Koya powder. This stuff is interesting…

So upon some researching, I found that serbuk koya means Koya powder. According to Selby’s Food Corner, “Koya powder is made from prawn crackers, fried garlic and dried shrimp.” They mention sprinkling it on top of a dish at that link, so I am assuming that it is to be sprinkled on top as a garnish.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added fresh broccoli, green bell pepper and onions, a hard boiled egg with some Cavender’s Greek Seasoning and some Dua Belibis Indonesian chili sauce. The noodles are pretty good – they break apart nicely and soaked up a good amount of broth. The broth was great – a combination of lime and other spices as well as a slight spiciness. This wasn’t bad but was expecting more heat. 3.25 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 089686917239 .

A commercial for the Sarimi Soto Koya line.

The street food in Jakarta, Indonesia is absolutely amazing – check out this guy – his restaurant is carried!

#867: Indomie Mi Instan Rasa Coto Makassar

This is a real treat – this is one of the varieties not available in the United States and was kindly sent by Edwin N. of Vancouver, BC! Thank you again so much! So what is Coto Makassar anyways? Well, here’s something I found here:

Coto? Nope, I am not misspelled the word to Soto (popular Indonesian dishes). Its a local name for the traditional food from South Sulawesi, a soup that consist of meat, specifically the innards of cow, and mixed with spices like galangal and pepper. Galangal is also known as Blue ginger, Alpinia galanga, or lengkuas in Indonesian name.

Makassar in the name refers to the capital city of South Sulawesi, where this unique dishes is very popular as the local traditional food.

Wikipedia says:

Coto Makassar or Coto Mangkasara (Makassarese), is an Indonesian culinary food originating from Makassar, South Sulawesi. It is a soup with seasoning broth made from starch.[1] The main content of this soup is beef and it can be mixed with innards such as intestine, liver, lungs, heart, tripe, or cow brain.[2]

Coto Makassar is usually served with Burasa or Ketupat.

Soup’s on – let’s try it!

Was very hard to read – black deep red – so I used some Photoshop magic to make it easier. Click to enlarge.

The noodle block.

Dry seasoning powder and chili powder.

Dark colored chunky base with the chili powder on top.

Seasoning oil packet.

Curious – smells kind of like peanut butter.

Fried onion!

Nothing better than a little fried onion on top!

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added some grocery store frozen stir-fry veggies, a hard boiled egg with Krazy Mixed Up Salt and some Dua Belibis. Noodles are good and work well in soup. Nice texture. The broth Has a very deep and dark color. Has a spicy and a funky beef taste – kind of a spicy vegetable beef kind of thing going on. Good stuff. 4.0 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 089686043051 .

Short film showing the preparation of Coto Makassar.

This is one bizarre documentary – “Heavy Metal Parking Lot” – Judas Priest fans in a parking lot at a show in 1986 – quite interesting.

#838: Sarimi Soto Koya Gurih

Here’s another one from my friend in  Jakarta, Indonesia – thanks again! This is another Indonesian noodle soup – not a dry noodle. Let’s give it a try! By the way – ‘Baru’ means new.

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge).

The noodle block.

Dry powder seasoning and chili powder.

The dry seasoning with chili powder atop.

Seasoned oil.

Has a nice lime scent.

This is a powdery garnish that goes on top.

So upon some researching, I found that serbuk koya means Koya powder. According to Selby’s Food Corner, “Koya powder is made from prawn crackers, fried garlic and dried shrimp.” They mention sprinkling it on top of a dish at that link, so I am assuming that it is to be sprinkled on top as a garnish.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added red bell pepper, broccoli, a fried egg with a little Krazy Mixed Up Salt, some roast beef and some Dua Belibis chili sauce. Decent noodles – not soggy, spongy or tough. The broth was nice – a good hit of lime flavor and spices. The koya on top adds an interesting extra flavor. Great stuff – 4.0 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 089686917260 .

Commercial for Sarimi Soto Koya Gurih.

Documentary about travel to orphanages in Indonesia.

#794: Sarimi Mi Instan Soto Koya Jeruk Nipis

Here’s another one that a friend in Indonesia sent – thanks again! Curious how this one will be; I translated it to what looks like Koya lime flavor soup.

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge).

The noodle block.

The seasoning powder and chili powder.

Here’s the chili powder atop the seasoning powder.

So upon some researching, I found that serbuk koya means Koya powder. According to Selby’s Food Corner, “Koya powder is made from prawn crackers, fried garlic and dried shrimp.”

It has an interesting taste and I believe I’ll be sprinkling it on top.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added a few Blue Diamond Sea Salt almonds. Noodles are nice – they have a good tension to them and absorb some of the broth flavor. The koyo powder adds a little extra something to the mix – very nicely. I really like this stuff – refreshing, tasty, a great kick of lime and a nice spiciness to it. 4.75 out of 5.0 stars. The broth UPC bar code 089686917208 .

Here’s the commercial!

I’ll be reviewing this one soon as well!

#785: Sarimi Isi 2 Rasa Soto

Here’s another one sent by my friend in Indonesia! Soto I’ve had before has had a very nice lime flavor to it I very much enjoyed. Curious if this one will be the same. Let’s see!

The back of the packaging (click image to enlarge).

A piece of the noodle block.

Dry seasonings: base on the left and chili powder on the right.

Base with chili powder atop.

Seasoned oil.

Dark and a little murky!

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added a hard-boiled egg, some veggies, some roasted chicken, a little Ajishima Kimchi furikake, some kizami shoga (pickled ginger), some Melinda’s Garlic Habanero hot sauce and a pinch of Krazy Mixed Up Salt. Okay so the noodles were a little banged up during the voyage from Indonesia, but they’re still pretty good – Fluffy noodles. The broth has that nice salty and tasty lime taste that I’ve found in other Soto varieties. Good stuff! 3.5 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 089686017717 .

<iframe width=”420″ height=”315″ src=”http://www.youtube.com/embed/NfYWdpbNEn8″ frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen>A Sarimi TV commercial

This looks amazing

#733: Meet The Manufacturer – Indomie Mi Instan Rasa Soto Betawi Khas Jakarta

Some of you might be saying ‘hey it’s Thursday; didn’t Meet The Manufacturer week start on Wednesday last week?’ Well, yeah but I skipped two days of reviewing so gotta make those up – only fair. So here we have Soto Betawi. Wikipedia has this to say about it:

Betawi soto, made of beef or beef offal, cooked in a whitish cow milk or coconut milk broth, with fried potato and tomato.

Dang I’m out of beef. Ah well – let’s give this a try!

Here’s the back of the packaging (click image to enlarge).

The noodles – standard gauge.

Dry seasoning – powdered seasoning on the left and chili powder on the right.

Here’s the powder seasoning and chili powder.

The wets : seasoned oil on the left and sweet soy sauce on the right.

Here’s both of them in one little sake cup.

Fried onions to put on top!

These are such a nice addition.

Finished (click image to enlarge). I added some local veggies, a little kizami shoga (pickled ginger), a couple of Blue Diamond Sea Salt Almonds and some Krazy Mixed Up Salt. Of the Indomie soups, I will have to say this is one of my favorites so far. The noodles are good as always, and the broth has a nice beef flavor and rich depth to it. I really like how the soup isn’t thick but has the flavor of somegthing that you would imagine to be. What you end up with is a very flavorful noodle soup with good character. 4.5 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 089686011227 .

How it’s made on the streets of Jakarta!

A quick tour of Jakarta’s great sights!

To think this package traveled to me, originating in one of those big skyscrapers!

Indomie’s first commercial?