Tag Archives: mayo

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Alright – bring on the confusion, the shock and the WTF’s. Yes, mayonnaise is very popular as a topping in Japan. Why? Well, it’s freaking awesome – it’s tasty and works very well. Yakisoba without it is just not as good.

Speaking of mayonnaise, I once had the chance to partake in a contest with a friend many years ago. Two jars of mayonnaise, I believe 12 ounce, were purchased. The challenge was to see who could eat more in 10 minutes. I was on no problem; I had the title of Mayonnaise King for a long time. But he wanted to challenge me so I figured why the hell not. This was at a party and people were actually betting on who would win. The timer started and the eating began.

Mayonnaise is thick and oily stuff. The first big bite was no problem, however, the second was. Once the first goes down, the next wants to stick to it so it is a very slow process. I did win, but by a slim margin. I think where I won though was as this was a party we were having some beers and I chose a Coors – very bubbly. This broke down the funk I had in my mouth from the mayo and I was back in action quickly. My opponent, however, sat on a couch, whining and moaning for much of the evening.

Here’s a little from Wikipedia about Japanese mayonnaise –

Japanese mayonnaise is typically made with apple cider vinegar or rice vinegar and a small amount of MSG, which gives it a different flavor from mayonnaise made from distilled vinegar.[39][page needed][40] It is most often sold in soft plastic squeeze bottles. Its texture is thicker than most Western commercial mayonnaise in part because only egg yolks and not the entire egg is used when making it.[41]

Apart from salads, it is popular with dishes such as okonomiyakitakoyaki and yakisoba and may also accompany katsu and karaage.[42]

Kewpie (Q.P.) is the most popular brand of Japanese mayonnaise,[43] advertised with a Kewpie doll logo. The vinegar is a proprietary blend containing apple and malt vinegars.[44] The Kewpie company was started in 1925 by Tochiro Nakashima, his goal was to create a condiment that made eating vegetables more enjoyable.[45]

So yeah – mayonnaise is great in yakisoba. I will say right here that I absolutely despise and wretch at the thought of Miracle Whip, so don’t even consider using it on yakisona. Let’s check this one out.

Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise – Japan

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The distribution sticker (click to enlarge). I wish they were better with the names of these products on these labels…

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Here’s detail of the outer wraps (click to enlarge). Unsure whether or not it contains meat. To prepare, open tab 1 to line 2. Take out sachets. Add in boiling water to line and close for 3~4 minutes. Open tab 3 and use to drain. Remove lid. add in powder sachet and combine. Finally, add mayonnaise sachet contents and enjoy!

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The noodle block.

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Loose garnish from inside the tray.

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

A powder sachet.

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The flavoring base.

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The mayonnaise sachet!

Finished (click to enlarge). The noodles are on the dry side although they pull in the yakisoba powder nicely. The powder coats everything and has a very authentic taste to it. The included garnish is great – I especially love the crunchy cabbage. Finally, the mayonnaise has a little kick to it and just brings it all home. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4902105226797.

#2687: Nissin Yakisoba With Mayonnaise - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Nissin UFO, Instant Japanese Sosu Yakisoba(Pan-fried Noodles), 4.5oz(129g) x 6pcs (For 6 servings)[Japan Import] (get it here)

A great TV spot for Nissin’s U.F.O.

#2668: Samyang Foods Wasa-Mayo Ramen

#2668: Samyang Foods Wasa-Mayo Ramen

I’ve had this for a little while – just sitting and waiting for me to give it a try. With the prodding of my readers, today is the day. People seem to be really interested in this one! Here’s what Samyang Foods had to say about it –

This is a stir-fried noodle with original mayonnaise and soybean sauce.
It features a friendly and cute package with a new character.
You can taste a harmonious flavor of Wasabi and Mayonnaise.
It’s a new concept of stir-fried noodle with three different sauces.
Enjoy our premium stir-fried noodles!

Alright – let’s get to it!

Samyang Foods Wasa-Mayo Ramen – South Korea

#2668: Samyang Foods Wasa-Mayo Ramen

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains egg. To prepare, add boiling water to line and cover for 4 minutes. Drain using poke-thru spout system in lid. Add in sachet contents. Stir and enjoy!

#2668: Samyang Foods Wasa-Mayo Ramen

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2668: Samyang Foods Wasa-Mayo Ramen

The noodle block.

#2668: Samyang Foods Wasa-Mayo Ramen

Loose bits from the bottom of the bowl.

#2668: Samyang Foods Wasa-Mayo Ramen

A liquid sachet.

#2668: Samyang Foods Wasa-Mayo Ramen

Thick and dark.

#2668: Samyang Foods Wasa-Mayo Ramen

A dual sachet.

#2668: Samyang Foods Wasa-Mayo Ramen

Wasabi on the left, mayo on the right.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts and spring onion. The noodles came out pretty well although slightly spongy. The flavor was pretty good – the soy flavor sauce had a nice sweetness to it. The mayonnaise and wasabi was a nice mixture but seemed to be missing something I can’t put my finger on. 3.25 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 8801073211261.

#2668: Samyang Foods Wasa-Mayo Ramen

Samyang Real WasaMayo Stir Noodle / newly launched / wasabi mayo / wasabi mayo stir noodle

really like this one

#1890: Kuriki Beef Tongue Shio Mayo Ramen

Okay so you might be wondering – beef tongue shio mayo ramen – that couldn’t possibly mean… Yes. Where did I get it though?

This is Shinichi. In the intro to the Bottom Ten List video, he was kind enough to do the narration. I thought he resided in Osaka, Japan, but he’s currently in the Seattle area going to college! We decided we should meet up at The Ramen Rater WHQ and talk about noodles. He’s working with Mr., Yamato of Yakantei in an attempt to educate people about instant noodles from very localized regions of Japan – I’ll let you know a lot more about it soon. He brought me some really different varieties of instant noodles over, one of them was this one.  To answer the question, yes – it’s mayonnaise flavor! Let’s check this one out!

The back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains fish. to prepare, boil 550ml water and cook noodle block for 3 minutes. Add in sachet contents and stir – cook another 1.5 minutes. Stir and enjoy!

The noodle block.

The first of two sachets.

Has an interesting scent – going to guess that this is the beef tongue flavor.

The second sachet.

Wow – it smells like mayonnaise – very strange!

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion, kizami shoga (pickled ginger), hard boiled egg and barbecue pork. The noodles have a nice gauge and tooth to them – like a light upgrade to your standard instant noodles. But that’s where the term ‘standard’ ends it applicability. The broth has a strong mayonnaise flavor with a kind of beefiness which is very ‘organ like’ – guessing it is ‘tongue-like.’ It’s a little weird eating something that’s supposed to taste like a tongue of a cow, but honestly, it’s quite good. The broth has a nice flavor and isn’t super thin, either. 4.5 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 4543185002002.

If you’re in the mood for something Japanese and want to try it with mayo style, look no further! Kewpie Mayonnaise (Japanese Mayo) – 500g Net 17.64 FL. OZ.

Eating beef tongue in Japan.

#1831: Kuriki Plum Mayo Ramen

Okay so you might be wondering – plum mayo ramen – that couldn’t possibly mean… Yes – plum and mayonnaise flavor. Where did I get it?

This is Shinichi. In the intro to the Bottom Ten List video, he was kind enough to do the narration. I thought he resided in Osaka, Japan, but he’s currently in the Seattle area going to college! We decided we should meet up at The Ramen Rater WHQ and talk about noodles. He’s working with Mr., Yamato of Yakantei in an attempt to educate people about instant noodles from very localized regions of Japan – and they have a special subscription box to check out. He brought me some really different varieties of instant noodles over, one of them was this one.  To answer the question, yes – it’s mayonnaise flavor! Let’s check this one out!

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains fish. to prepare, boil 550ml water and cook noodle block for 3 minutes. Add in sachet contents and stir – cook another 1.5 minutes. Stir and enjoy!

The noodle block.

The first of two powder sachets.

Has a definite plum scent – something I’ve never found when sniffing instant noodle seasonings!

The second seasoning sachet.

This one does indeed smell like mayonnaise!

Finished. Added spring onion. The noodles are perfect instant noodles – gauge and chew are as standard and right as the sky is blue. The broth is something that will make anyone stop for a second and then emit a resounding ‘hmm.’ It’s definitely got a plum scent as well as a mayonnaise scent. I would never think of dipping a plum in mayonnaise, but perhaps people in Japan have and maybe some even do. Well, it works – there’s a nice balance of flavor and little bits of plum and a hint of spiciness.  My wife said it tasted like Christmas! This works though – worth trying if you can find it. 4.0 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4543185002170.

If you’re in the mood for something Japanese and want to try it with mayo style, look no further! Kewpie Mayonnaise (Japanese Mayo) – 500g Net 17.64 FL. OZ.

This guys really likes mayonnaise!

#1752: Kuriki Mayo Ramen

Okay so you might be wondering – mayo ramen – that couldn’t possibly mean… Yes. Where did I get it though?

This is Shinichi. In the intro to the Bottom Ten List video, he was kind enough to do the narration. I thought he resided in Osaka, Japan, but he’s currently in the Seattle area going to college! We decided we should meet up at The Ramen Rater WHQ and talk about noodles. He’s working with Mr., Yamato of Yakantei in an attempt to educate people about instant noodles from very localized regions of Japan – I’ll let you know a lot more about it soon. He brought me some really different varieties of instant noodles over, one of them was this one.  To answer the question, yes – it’s mayonnaise flavor! Let’s check this one out!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Contains fish. to prepare, boil 550ml water and cook noodle block for 3 minutes. Add in sachet contents and stir – cook another 1.5 minutes. Stir and enjoy!

Inside, the noodle block is within its own bag.

The noodle block.

The soup base sachet.

Has a nice scent with pork notes.

A second sachet.

This smells like mayonnaise for sure!

A solid ingredients sachet.

A very nice assortment of what looks to be crab stick, corn, cabbage and other bits.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added pork, spring onion, mung bean sprout and hard boiled egg. The noodles were extremely good – excellent quality and chew to them. Quite a lot of them as well. The broth was really intriguing; indeed, it has the flavor of mayonnaise, but also I get a pork kind of flavor as well; like a creamy mayo pork. It works very well! The added bits hydrated very well and were of great diversity and quality – corn and crab stick among them. 4.75 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4543185001975.

If you’re in the mood for something Japanese and want to try it with mayo style, look no further! Kewpie Mayonnaise (Japanese Mayo) – 500g Net 17.64 FL. OZ.

I think he’s wolfing down mayonnaise and wasabi.

#244: Nissin Karashi Mayonnaise Flavor Yakisoba Pan-Fried Noodles

So look upon this with awe and silent adoration. Mayonnaise flavor noodles. Mayonnaise on the noodles. Mayonnaise. It’s just so amazing. This one is using something called Karashi Mayo.  Wikipedia says lends  some light to this situation…

Karashi (芥子, 辛子, からし, or カラシ?) is a type of mustard used as a condiment or as a seasoning in Japanese cuisine. Karashi is made from the crushed seeds of Brassica juncea. Karashi is usually sold in powder form or paste form in tubes. Karashi in powder form is prepared for use by mixing with lukewarm water to a paste and leaving it covered for a few minutes.[1]Karashi is often served with tonkatsu, oden, natto, and shumai.[2]Karashi can be used as part of a dipping sauce when mixed with mayonnaise, called karashi mayonnaise or with vinegar and miso, called karashi su miso.[3] It is also used to make pickledjapanese eggplant, called karashi-nasu.[4]

So it’s a mayo infused with some karashi. Sounds good – on! on!

Click image to enlarge. Very straightforward instructions – hot water, spout, packets out, yes yes…

The top is a nice little packet of the karashi mayo and the lower is powdered yakisoba sauce.

Finished noodles and the soba sauce powder on top awaiting a vigorous stir.

Click image to enlarge. Well there you have it – maybe not as perfect as on the package but a reasonably successful attempt. So how is it? Oh, it’s freaking awesome! Kind of like wasabi mayo. The noodles are great too and the veggies are nice. One thing though – I wish the noodles were a slight bit chewier. But other than that, bravo Nissin, thank you for this flavorful indulgence – 4.75 out of 5.0 stars!