Tag Archives: hakodate

#2711: Acecook Hakodate Shio Shrimp Ramen

#2711: Acecook Hakodate Shio Shrimp Ramen

Found this one at Osaka market up in Richmond, BC. We’ve been going on little day trips to Canada a lot lately and it’s a lot of fun! At this market, we go infrequently enough that they have some neat new stuff every time. They’ve got a special section by the hot food area that has special instant noodles. They’re almost all from Japan and usually on the pricy side. I want to thank Ryuuichirou Arai for helping me with the translation. Here’s a little about shio from Wikipedia –

Shio (“salt”) ramen is a pale, clear, yellowish broth made with plenty of salt and any combination of chicken, vegetables, fish, and seaweed. Occasionally pork bones are also used, but they are not boiled as long as they are for tonkotsu ramen, so the soup remains light and clear. Chāshū is sometimes swapped for lean chicken meatballs, and pickled plums and kamaboko (a slice of processed fish roll sometimes served as a frilly white circle with a pink or red spiral called narutomaki) are popular toppings as well. Noodle texture and thickness varies among shio ramen, but they are usually straight rather than curly.

Alright – let’s give this one a try!

Acecook Hakodate Shio Shrimp Ramen – Japan

#2711: Acecook Hakodate Shio Shrimp Ramen

Detail of the import/distributor sticker (click to enlarge).

#2711: Acecook Hakodate Shio Shrimp Ramen

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Unsure but probably contains pork, crustaceans, and seafood. To prepare, add boiling water to fill line and cover for 5 minutes. Add in the liquid base. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2711: Acecook Hakodate Shio Shrimp Ramen

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2711: Acecook Hakodate Shio Shrimp Ramen

The noodle block.

#2711: Acecook Hakodate Shio Shrimp Ramen

Loose seasoning and garnish from the cup.

#2711: Acecook Hakodate Shio Shrimp Ramen

A liquid base sachet.

#2711: Acecook Hakodate Shio Shrimp Ramen

Thick and lustrous.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Comso mung bean sprouts and spring onion. The noodles were pretty good – decent gauge and chew, especially for a cup. The broth was where this fell off. Now, it’s a shio (salt) broth, but damn I’ve never had one that was so salty before. I love shio, but this was just not very good. The microthin chashu seemed completely out of place. 1.0 out of 5,.0 stars. JAN bar code 4901071239190.

#2711: Acecook Hakodate Shio Shrimp Ramen

Acecook non-fried seaweed noodles soy sauce 86g ~ 12 pieces

An Acecook Japan noodles TV commercial

#2534: Fujiwara Hokkaido Hakodate Shoyu Ramen

#2534: Fujiwara Hokkaido Hakodate Shoyu Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Seems like a little while since I did a pack instant ramen from Japan. This is one I found during my trip to Taiwan last November at the Carrefour in Taipei by the Miramar Entertainment Park. I tell you – they had quite an impressive instant noodle aisle – like 4 aisles really. So this one is a shoyu instant ramen. Here’s a little from Wikipedia about shoyu ramen –

Shōyu (醤油, “soy sauce”) ramen is the oldest of the five, it has a clear brown broth, based on a chicken and vegetable (or sometimes fish or beef) stock with plenty of soy sauce added resulting in a soup that is tangy, salty, and savory yet still fairly light on the palate. Shōyu ramen usually has curly noodles rather than straight ones, but this is not always the case. It is often adorned with marinated bamboo shoots or menma, green onions, kamaboko (fish cakes), nori (seaweed), boiled eggs, bean sprouts and/or black pepper; occasionally the soup will also contain chili oil or Chinese spices, and some shops serve sliced beef instead of the usual chāshū.

Alright – this is the last of these varieties I lugger back from Taiwan. I think actually I’ve reviewed everything I brought back – gonna have to visit again and get more! Let’s check this one out.

Fujiwara Hokkaido Hakodate Shoyu Ramen – Japan

#2534: Fujiwara Hokkaido Hakodate Shoyu Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Probably contains pork but not sure. To prepare, add noodles to 600ml boiling water and cook for 3 minutes. Add in sachet contents. finally, stir and enjoy!

#2534: Fujiwara Hokkaido Hakodate Shoyu Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater

The noodle block.

#2534: Fujiwara Hokkaido Hakodate Shoyu Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Liquid soup base sachet.

#2534: Fujiwara Hokkaido Hakodate Shoyu Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Deep in color and fatty.

#2534: Fujiwara Hokkaido Hakodate Shoyu Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Finished (click to enlarge). Added egg, Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, kizami shoga, spring onion, chashu pork and shichimi togarashi. The noodles have a round gauge and a kind of rubbery chew. Not the way I generally like things, however the broth takes care of that. The broth has a very tasty shoyu flavor and is rich as well as good in body and oiliness. 4.0 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4976651083531.

#2534: Fujiwara Hokkaido Hakodate Shoyu Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Fujiwara noodle Hokkaido ramen Hakodate salt 111gX10 bags

Dancing squid!

#2516: Fujiwara Hokkaido Hakodate Miso Ramen

#2516: Fujiwara Hokkaido Hakodate Miso Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Seems like a little while since I did a pack instant ramen from Japan. This is one I found during my trip to Taiwan last November at the Carrefour in Taipei by the Miramar Entertainment Park. I tell you – they had quite an impressive instant noodle aisle – like 4 aisles really. So this one is a miso instant ramen. Here’s a little from Wikipedia about ramen –

The origin of ramen is unclear. Some sources say it is of Chinese origin.[7][8][9] Other sources say it was invented in Japan in the early 20th century.[10][11][12]

The name ramen is the Japanese pronunciation of the Chinese lamian (拉麵).[13] Until the 1950s, ramen was called shina soba (支那そば, literally “Chinese soba”) but today chūka soba (中華そば, also meaning “Chinese soba”) or just Ramen (ラーメン) are more common, as the word “支那” (shina, meaning “China”) has acquired a pejorative connotation.[4]

By 1900, restaurants serving Chinese cuisine from Canton and Shanghai offered a simple ramen dish of noodles (cut rather than hand-pulled), a few toppings, and a broth flavored with salt and pork bones. Many Chinese living in Japan also pulled portable food stalls, selling ramen and gyōza dumplings to workers. By the mid-1900s, these stalls used a type of a musical horn called a charumera (チャルメラ, from the Portuguese charamela) to advertise their presence, a practice some vendors still retain via a loudspeaker and a looped recording. By the early Shōwa period, ramen had become a popular dish when eating out.

Fujiwara Hokkaido Hakodate Miso Ramen – Japan

#2516: Fujiwara Hokkaido Hakodate Miso Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Unsure of meat contents. To prepare, add noodle block to 600ml boiling water and cook for 3 minutes. Add in sachet contents. finally, stir and enjoy!

#2516: Fujiwara Hokkaido Hakodate Miso Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater

The noodle block.

#2516: Fujiwara Hokkaido Hakodate Miso Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater

The soup base sachet.

#2516: Fujiwara Hokkaido Hakodate Miso Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Thick and oily.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion, Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, egg and chashu pork. The noodles came out well enough. A little chewy for the gauge. The broth is miso and has a pretty good taste to it. 3.5 out of 5.0 stars. JAN bar code 4976651083548.

#2516: Fujiwara Hokkaido Hakodate Miso Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater

Fujiwara noodle Hokkaido ramen Hakodate salt 111gX10 bags

A video on how to make ramen

#2461: Fujiwara Hokkaido Hakodate Shio Ramen

#2461: Fujiwara Hokkaido Hakodate Shio Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant ramen

Seems like a little while since I did a pack instant ramen from Japan. This is one I found during my trip to Taiwan last November at the Carrefour in Taipei by the Miramar Entertainment Park. I tell you – they had quite an impressive instant noodle aisle – like 4 aisles really. So this one is a shio instant ramen. Here’s a little from Wikipedia about shio –

The origin of ramen is unclear. Some sources say it is of Chinese origin.[7][8][9] Other sources say it was invented in Japan in the early 20th century.[10][11][12]

The name ramen is the Japanese pronunciation of the Chinese lamian (拉麵).[13] Until the 1950s, ramen was called shina soba (支那そば, literally “Chinese soba”) but today chūka soba (中華そば, also meaning “Chinese soba”) or just Ramen (ラーメン) are more common, as the word “支那” (shina, meaning “China”) has acquired a pejorative connotation.[4]

By 1900, restaurants serving Chinese cuisine from Canton and Shanghai offered a simple ramen dish of noodles (cut rather than hand-pulled), a few toppings, and a broth flavored with salt and pork bones. Many Chinese living in Japan also pulled portable food stalls, selling ramen and gyōza dumplings to workers. By the mid-1900s, these stalls used a type of a musical horn called a charumera (チャルメラ, from the Portuguese charamela) to advertise their presence, a practice some vendors still retain via a loudspeaker and a looped recording. By the early Shōwa period, ramen had become a popular dish when eating out.

According to ramen expert Hiroshi Osaki, the first specialized ramen shop opened in Yokohama in 1910.[9]

Shio (“salt”) ramen is a pale, clear, yellowish broth made with plenty of salt and any combination of chicken, vegetables, fish, and seaweed. Occasionally pork bones are also used, but they are not boiled as long as they are for tonkotsu ramen, so the soup remains light and clear. Chāshū is sometimes swapped for lean chicken meatballs, and pickled plums and kamaboko (a slice of processed fish roll sometimes served as a frilly white circle with a pink or red spiral called narutomaki) are popular toppings as well. Noodle texture and thickness varies among shio ramen, but they are usually straight rather than curly.

I should mention that while this article claims the origin of ramen is unclear, I have spoken with many people with many different opinions they hold as fact on this. Let’s tear open this package and see it’s innards.

Fujiwara Hokkaido Hakodate Shio Ramen – Japan

#2461: Fujiwara Hokkaido Hakodate Shio Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant ramen

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Unsure of meat contents. To prepare, add noodle block to 600ml boiling water and cook for 3 minutes. Add in sachet contents. finally, stir and enjoy!

#2461: Fujiwara Hokkaido Hakodate Shio Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant ramen

The noodles in their own sealed pouch.

#2461: Fujiwara Hokkaido Hakodate Shio Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant ramen

The soup base sachet.

#2461: Fujiwara Hokkaido Hakodate Shio Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant ramen

A liquid base.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, chashu pork, spring onion and shichimi togarashi. The noodles have a firmer chew to them than your average instant. This imparts a more quality effect. The broth is very tasty even though the pack only has one liquid sachet and takes 600ml water – a pretty large amount. The shio taste is pretty good – and the oiliness is just right; beads dance on the surface like glistening jewels of slurpiness. 4.5 out of 5.0 stars.  JAN bar code 4976651083555.

#2461: Fujiwara Hokkaido Hakodate Shio Ramen - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant ramen

Fujiwara noodle Hokkaido ramen Hakodate salt 111gX10 bags

Anthony Bourdain visits a Hokkaido ramen shop.