Tag Archives: import

#2769: Ottogi Kimchi Ramen

#2769: Ottogi Kimchi Ramen

Another one I found in Taiwan. This one is quite interesting as far as the packaging goes. Not only do you see Korean print but Chinese as well. This product is definitely for sale in Taiwan only – an export version. As far as the recipe changing from place to place, I have no clue. Here’s a little about kimchi from Wikipedia –

Kimchi (/ˈkɪm/Korean김치translit. gimchi, IPA: [kim.tɕʰi]), a staple in Korean cuisine, is a traditional side dish made from salted and fermented vegetables, most commonly napa cabbage and Korean radishes, with a variety of seasonings including chili powderscallionsgarlicginger, and jeotgal (salted seafood).[1][2] There are hundreds of varieties of kimchi made with different vegetables as the main ingredients.[3][4] In traditional preparations, kimchi was stored underground in jars to keep cool, and unfrozen during the winter months.[2] With the rise of technologykimchi refrigerators are more commonly used to make kimchi.

I’ve been a fan of kimchi for a while – tasty and tangy and spicy. I’ve gotten a lot of reactions to it – most notably my friend Matt B. who literally freaked out and ran out of my kitchen when he smelled it. Honestly, I really don’t know why he had such a reaction – I really like it. Anyways, let’s give this variety a try.

Ottogi Kimchi Ramen – South Korea

#2769: Ottogi Kimchi Ramen

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Unsure whether it contains meat or not. Some interesting things here – lower right, it mentions insurance. In instructions, mentions seasonings and condiments – however there’s only a powder sachet. To prepare, add noodles and sachet contents to 550ml boiling water and cook for 4 minutes. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2769: Ottogi Kimchi Ramen

The noodle block.

#2769: Ottogi Kimchi Ramen

The seasoning sachet.

#2769: Ottogi Kimchi Ramen

Looks like powder and some vegetable matter.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, spring onion, processed cheese and egg. The noodles are great – nice gauge ramyun with a kind of slick outer and chewier inner. The broth was nice as well – tangy kimchi hit to it. Good on the spicy as well. The aftertaste was a bit bitter. 3.5 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 8801045521312.

#2769: Ottogi Kimchi Ramen

Ottogi, Instant K i m c h i  Ramen, net weight 120 g (Pack of 2 pieces) / Beststore by KK8

An Ottogi TV spot – don’t you want to enjoy some mayonnaise right now?

#1955: Nissin Raoh Ramen Noodle Soup Umami Soy Sauce Flavor

Here’s the last of the three different Nissin Raoh varieties Nissin Foods USa sent me – thanks again! These have been availble overseas for a very long time, however they are now being imported and distributed in new packaging and with slightly different ingredients for easy import into the United States. This would be known as shoyu over in Japan (shoyu translates into soy sauce). Shoyu is a very popular variety of ramen – here’s a little on it from wikipedia:

Shōyu (“soy sauce”) ramen typically has a clear brown broth, based on a chicken and vegetable (or sometimes fish or beef) stock with plenty of soy sauce added resulting in a soup that is tangy, salty, and savory yet still fairly light on the palate. Shōyu ramen usually has curly noodles rather than straight ones, but this is not always the case. It is often adorned with marinated bamboo shoots or menma, green onions, kamaboko (fish cakes),nori (seaweed), boiled eggs, bean sprouts and/or black pepper; occasionally the soup will also contain chili oil or Chinese spices, and some shops serve sliced beef instead of the usual chāshū.

Let’s have a look and see how this one fares.

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, add noodle block to 2 cups of boiling water and cook for 4 minutes. Add contents of sachet to a bowl. Add water to bowl and mix well. Add in noodles. Enjoy!

The noodle block.

The soup base sachet.

Has a soy scent.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added hard boiled egg, spring onion and ito togarashi (pepper strands). The noodles are very good – nice gauge and chew. They are definitely premium – very good. The broth is a very lovely shoyu taste – complex and hearty, with a good oiliness. 4.75 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 070662500019.

Nissin RAOH Ramen Noodle Soup, Umami Soy Sauce, 107 Gram (Pack of 10)

An older Nissin Raoh TV commercial from Japan.

#795: Master Kong Red Oil Dan Dan Noodles

Here’s another one that Bo H. sent me from China! Thanks again! So what are Dan Dan noodles? here’s what Wikipedia says:

Dandan noodles or Dandanmian (traditional Chinese: 擔擔麵, simplified Chinese: 担担面) is a classic dish originating from ChineseSichuan cuisine. It consists of a spicy sauce containing preserved vegetables (often including zha cai, 榨菜, lower enlarged mustard stems, or ya cai, 芽菜, upper mustard stems), chili oil, Sichuan pepper, minced pork, and scallions served over noodles.

Alrighty then, let’s give it a try!

I cut and pasted all the text from the lid and scanned it. Click to enlarge.

Hey – chopsticks!

Here’s the big packet of spicy paste.

That’s a lot of goopy stuff – looks spicy!

The vegetables.

Looks like a nice little bunch of veggies.

Then there’s this little pouch with little hard things in it…

I ate one and I think they get sprinkled on top at the end.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Interesting… This one was fun to try; I’m really looking forward to these Master Kong’s as they’re huge in China and these aren’t available around this neck of the woods, that’s for sure. The noodles aren’t bad, – there’s a lot of them too. The flavor is a little bit spicy and a bit greasy. The veggies are nice. The only problem here is it seems kind of bland to me. Could use a little more flavor I think. 2.75 out of 5.0 stars.UPC bar code 6903252084818 .

Here’s a Master Kong commercial

How to make DanDan noodles at home

#321: Little Cook Spicy Beef Flavor

So this looks really interesting. Upon tearing off the outer cellophane, i notice that where it says NEW TVP SPICY BEEF FLAVOR is actually a sticker. In fact, on the sides there were stickers as well – ingredients, nutrition facts and direction on preparation.

My Spidey Senses were tingling. I took the lid off of the bowl and held it up to my swing arm lamp. Lo and behold, hidden by the NEW TVP SPICY BEEF sticker were the sacred words ‘with Real Meat.’

The bowl contained two packets – first a small one containing some bit of veg and some soup base very much smelling and tasting like curry.

Then, the retort pouch – something I have not seen since my youth. What is funny is that its exactly the same as it was when I was a kid – same size, lettering and everything. So this means there’s some sauce and possibly some decent veg and meat going on inside. Thing is that from seeing what it said underneath the sticker on top and reading the ingredients sticker, I was not going to find any meat in this sucker.

Ah yes – don’t use this if its punctured or oozing everywhere.

There’s the curry like soup base atop the noodles. See the line? That’s the boiling water line! I was floored – it asks for so much…

But I obliged it to a degree; it said to leave the lid attached and use the Retort Pouch to hold it down as the noodles ‘cooked.’ I decided of course to go the sane route and use an old Tower of Power record.

Here we are – the finished product (click image to enlarge). First, the noodles are great – nice texture and firmness. The broth is spicy and beef-like and very curry. Finally the textured vegetable protein fake meat things that are found here and there are really weird but interesting and flavorful too. In short, this whole things is a smorgasbord of oddities tat I find irresistable. 4.75 out of 5.0 stars! Little Cook is the man!