Tag Archives: gochujang

The Ramen Rater’s Ramyun Sliders

With the recent popularity of the ‘ramen burger,’ I felt it necessary to try them out, but with a twist.  South Korean ramyun is easily available by many brand and the noodles are thicker as well as more plentiful than other country’s varieties. Let’s give this a try!

The Ramen Rater’s Ramyun Sliders

Ingredients

  • 1 block South Korean style ramyun noodles – any brand (Nongshim, Ottogi, Paldo, Samyang all would be perfect for this. I used Ottogi Ramyonsari as it doesn’t have a seasoning packet included).
  • 1 egg
  • Kimchi
  • Busan fish cake OR hamburger (I thought the fish cake would be perfect, but since not everyone likes fish, hamburger would go fine – could even use vegetarian meat)
  • gochucjang
  • cheese (optional)
  • oil

Directions:

2013_8_11_rec_001

Make sure you’ve got a block of ramyun – it’s pretty simple to do: if the noodles are wider than most instant noodles you’ve seen before, they’re probably ramyun (especially if they’re a product of South Korea – or in Nongshim’s case, Rancho Cucamonga, California).

Drop the noodles in a pot of boiling water for about 4 minutes. You won’t need the seasoning packets.

Drain the noodles really well. Return the noodles to the pot you cooked them in and crack an egg over them. Stir until the egg is full combined with the noodles.

Put the noodle/egg mixture on a dinner plate and flatten a little – spreading them out a little.

Now take the other plate and press it down on the mixture firmly. Put this in the fridge for two hours.

After the two hours, pull the plates out. Take the top plate off carefully. Use a spatula to loosen the noodles from the lower plate and drop them on a cutting board.

Use a pizza wheel to cut the noodles into squares. You could also use a cookie cutter to cuts them into circles or other shapes should you desire.

Put some oil in a skillet, heat, and start frying up the squares. I did it over medium heat and it took a few minutes per side to get them nice and golden. After they’re done, let cool for a minute on some paper towels (this will sop up any extra oil).

Let’s make these bad boys! First layer I did was the Busan fish cake. I cooked mine in the microwave.

Then a couple pieces of kimchi.

I really like cheese in my ramyun, so I thought why not try it on these?

A nice bit of gochujang.

Put the other half of the ‘bun’ on and you’re finished!

Finished (click to enlarge image). The ramyun buns came out really nice. They have a great crispness and wonderful textures to them. It’s kind of like a handheld spicy ramyun noodle bowl! If you decide to try this, let me know – send pictures and I’ll post them here! Eager to see your creations!

Gol Bim Men Recipe – Paldo Bibim Men with Bai-Top Shell

Today, I’m trying a new recipe sent to me by the folks at Paldo! Summer is right around the corner and this cold noodle dish is great to enjoy during the warmer months of the year. It was first introduced on a South Korean TV show on the KBS network called ‘Happy Together’ (click here to see the video). It uses some ingredients I’ve never heard of before, but I’m sure the folks in South Korea are very familiar with them – Cho Gochujang and Bai-Top Shell. Cho Gochujang is a gochujang infused with vinegar. But what’s bai-top you ask? Sea snails! Never had snails from the sea or otherwise before. Thank you to Moses over at Paldo America for sending me everything to make this! Always excited to try something new.

Here’s a video I made of how to create this simple and refreshing dish.

Gol-Bim-Men (골빔면)

Ingredients:

  • Paldo Bibim Men
  • Bai-Top Shell (in the recipe I’m using a can of Dongwon Canned Bai-Top Shell (hot))
  • Cucumber
  • 1 tsp Cho Gochujang (I’m using Ottogi)
  • 1/2 tsp Sesame Oil

Directions:

  1. Prepare the cucumber, slice into long pieces
  2. To prepare the Bai-Top Shell, slice into thin pieces. 5 prepared Bai-Top per pack of Bibim Men works here.
  3. Combine cucumber, sliced Bai-Top Shell, Bibim Men Sauce Pack, Cho Gochujang, Sesame oil.
  4. Add the mixture to the noodles and stir well. Enjoy!

Here’s the finished product (click image to enlarge). This is really quite good! The Bai-Top shell was extremely good – I hadn’t a clue that I would like sea snail! Also commonly known as whelk, it has a chewy texture not unlike clams. These canned ones were in a slightly spicy sauce which was really good. Paired with the cho gochujang, I devoured the leftovers of the can after the video.The sweet and spicy flavors along with the coolness of cucumber and texture of the bai-top all melded together very nicely. Give it a try!

#879: Song Hak Rice Topokki Bowl

While at the KS Mart in Lynnwood, Washington, I saw this and had to give it a try. Wasn’t sure what (if any) noodles would be within, although I know one thing: topokki (or ttebokki) are really neat – they’re like enormous noodle chunks. Korean food is awesome stuff. Here’s what Wikipedia says about how it arrived in its current form:

Following the Korean War a new type of tteokbokki became very popular. While the older version was a savory dish, this latter type was much spicier, and quickly became more popular than the older traditional dish. In addition to traditional ingredients, this tteokbokki used gochujang, a fermented, spicy paste made from chilli peppers, along with fish cakes. Other ingredients added to tteokbokki include boiled eggs, pan-fried mandu (Korean dumplings), sausages, ramyeon (which then becomes rabokki/labokki 라볶이), a variety of fried vegetables, and cheese. These days, many kinds of tteokbokki are popular such as seafood tteokbokki(해물 떡볶이) or rice tteokbokki(쌀떡볶이). Flour tteokbokki was popular in early days, but rice tteokbokki is more popular these days.

Sindang-dong in Seoul, where tteokbokki was first sold, is still very famous for the dish and treated as the mekkah of tteokbokki. Since Tteokbokki has become one of the most popular dishes, one will easily find a place to enjoy eating Tteokbokki in Korea.

Check out the full Wikipedia article here. Now, let’s open this thing up!

Here’s the importer’s sticker (click to enlarge). Ethyl alcohol? Yep – you definitely smell it when its cooking in the microwave.

Here are the side panels (click to enlarge). The sticker was hard to remove – my apologies.

Hey! A new included fork for the Included Forks page!

Here’s the topokki! Like big trippy noodle pieces.

Here’s the spicy sauce!

Hey what is this? I’m taking a shot in the dark here, but I think what you do is open it and pour water into it up to the line. This one’s going to be a real crap-shoot as far as figuring out how it is prepared, but here’s my guess: empty everything into the bowl as well as 50ml of water. Microwave for 2 1/2 minutes. Hope for good results…

Finished (click image to enlarge). I decided to pair it with some of the kimchi I also got at KS Mart in Lynnwood, Washington. I know, it’s a little greenish still – it was very fresh and it’s not completely ripe yet… I have trouble resisting the kimchi. Speaking of kimchi, my 7 year old boy HATES the stuff. But he’s awesome so here’s a link to his blog, Andy’s LEGO Stuff. So the stuff on the right – that’s the topokki. The topokki is chewy and hearty and enjoyable! The flavor is wonderful – spicy like gochujang and has just the right spices and stuff; kind of reminds me of canned ravioli sauce but spicy and a ton better. This should replace anything remotely like Spaghetti-O’s on your shelf if you can find it! This is some tasty and really spicy stuff! Yeeow! 5.0 out of 5.0 stars – pure tasty awesomeness in a very simple form.n UPC bar code 8803560010692 .

You know, every day that I realize that there hasn’t been a huge explosion of Korean and Indonesian restaurants in this country it saddens me a little more. I’m so lucky to live in an area that has a rich ethnic population and a lot of Asian groceries!

This guy’s gotta be happy going to school there! Wow!