Tag Archives: 明星食品

#2715: Myojo Hyobanya Shio Yakisoba

#2215: Myojo Hyobanya Shio Yakisoba - Japan - zenpop zenpop.jp www.zenpop.jp

Today we have a Zenpop.JP variety – so what’s Zenpop? They’re a subscription service for all things Japanese! Definitely, check them out. By the way, use coupon code RAMENRATER to get $2 off! Here’s what they had to say about this variety:

This is also low-salt but you would never notice that (which is same for other noodles in this pack too!) It has a flavor of savory beef and vegetable. Nice and simple! Enjoy this popular Japanese noodle dish anytime. 

This Myojo variety is a yakisoba – here’s a little about it from Wikipedia –

Yakisoba (焼きそば[jakʲiꜜsoba]), literally “fried buckwheat,” is a Japanese noodle stir-fry dish. Although soba means buckwheat, yakisoba noodles are actually made from wheat flour, and are typically flavored with a condiment similar to oyster sauce. The dish first appeared in food stalls in Japan during the early 20th century.[1]

Yakisoba is most familiarly served on a plate either as a main dish or a side dish. Another popular way to prepare and serve yakisoba in Japan is to pile the noodles into a bun sliced down the middle in the style of a hot dog, and garnish the top with mayonnaise and shreds of pickled ginger. Called yakisoba-pan (pan meaning bread) it is commonly available at local festivals or konbini (convenience stores).

Sometimes, Japanese white Udon is used as a replacement of Chinese style Soba and called Yakiudon. This variation was started in Kitakyushu or Kokura in Fukuoka Prefecture.

In Okinawa, Yakisoba is popular with Okinawans and U.S. service members stationed on the island alike. After the 1945 hostilities ended on Okinawa, the US military command supplied American food products to the malnourished residents. The preferred Okinawan Yakisoba was prepared from spaghetti, spam, ketchup, any available vegetable (usually canned), and mayonnaise for frying. Mess halls and other on-base eateries often serve yakisoba. Chopped hotdogs are a popular addition to yakisoba made on Okinawa, in addition to other meats such as ham, chicken, and pork.

Sounds great to me – let’s take a look!

Myojo Hyobanya Shio Yakisoba – Japan

#2215: Myojo Hyobanya Shio Yakisoba - Japan - zenpop zenpop.jp www.zenpop.jp

Detail of the bottom and side panels (click to enlarge because this took extra long for me to do). Contains pork, chicken, and beef. To prepare, add boiling water to line and cover for 3 minutes. Use drain spout to drain carefully. Add in sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2215: Myojo Hyobanya Shio Yakisoba - Japan - zenpop zenpop.jp www.zenpop.jp

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2215: Myojo Hyobanya Shio Yakisoba - Japan - zenpop zenpop.jp www.zenpop.jp

The noodle block.

#2215: Myojo Hyobanya Shio Yakisoba - Japan - zenpop zenpop.jp www.zenpop.jp

Loose bits from inside the tray.

#2215: Myojo Hyobanya Shio Yakisoba - Japan - zenpop zenpop.jp www.zenpop.jp

The liquid base sachet.

#2215: Myojo Hyobanya Shio Yakisoba - Japan - zenpop zenpop.jp www.zenpop.jp

Oil and seasoning.

#2215: Myojo Hyobanya Shio Yakisoba - Japan - zenpop zenpop.jp www.zenpop.jp

The garnish sachet.

#2215: Myojo Hyobanya Shio Yakisoba - Japan - zenpop zenpop.jp www.zenpop.jp

Has a seaweed scent.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added baked chicken, spring onion, and Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts. The noodles were light and almost a little fluffy. The flavor was really great – definitely a grilled chicken kind of taste which was very good. The bits of meat and cabbage were nicely hydrated and of good quality. 4.5 out of 5.0 stars.  JAN bar code 4902881426367.

#2215: Myojo Hyobanya Shio Yakisoba - Japan - zenpop zenpop.jp www.zenpop.jp

MYOJO IPPEI-CHAN YOMISE Y A K I S O B A  INSTANT NOODLE CASE [12pcs] by Myojo

I’m unusre but I think this guy does a periodic run-down of the new instant ramen in Japan

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Here’s another one I found in Taiwan on my trip in November of 2016. Yakisoba is one of my favorites – and my wife Kit likes it quite a bit as well. As I’ve said before, I’m usually quite a few reviews ahead as normally I do two reviews a day but only post one. Right now It’s February 20th, 2017 and our new President Trump has only been in office for a month. I have to assure my friends from all over the world that indeed not all of us are rude and boorish as he is and respect other people’s rights. That being said, let’s talk more about this one!

This is a yaki soba with mentaiko and mentaiko flavored mayo. Here’s some info from Wikipedia about mentaiko:

Pollock roe, the salted roe of Alaska pollock, is a popular culinary ingredient in Japan, Korea, and Russia. In Korea, the roe of Alaska pollock is traditionally called myeongnan (명란), and the salted roe is called myeongnanjeot (명란젓). The food was introduced to Japan after World War II, and is called mentaiko (明太子) in Japanese. The milder, less spicy version is called tarako (鱈子) in Japan. In Russian, it is called ikra mintaya (икра минтая).

Yessir – fish eggs! They’re pretty common in Japanese foods. They’re bright and colorful and I like ’em! So let’s check out this mentaiko flavor instant yakisoba!

Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor – Japan

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Detail of the side and bottom of the package (click to enlarge).

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge). Contains fish products. To prepare, open tab 1 to dotted line marked 2. Remove sachets. Add boiling water to line and close for 3 minutes. Open tab 3 to expose drain spout and drain. Add in sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The noodle block.

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Some loose pieces in the tray.

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

A liquid sachet.

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

Definitely yakisoba sauce.

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

A dry sachet.

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The mentaiko.

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

The mentaiko taste karashi mayo.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spring onion and Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts. The noodles have a nice chew and the sheer amount of them is pretty impressive. They have a nice slaty and oily taste with a bit of mentaiko throughout. The karashi masyo with mentaiko flavor is really good – also lubes up the noodles a little more. 4.5 out of 5.0 stars.  JAN bar code 4902881436137.

#2418: Myojo Yomise No Yakisoba Karashi Mentaiko Flavor - Japan - The Ramen Rater - instant noodles

MYOJO IPPEI-CHAN YOMISE YAKISOBA INSTANT NOODLE CASE [12pcs] by Myojo

A vintage Myojo TV commercial for Yakisoba Jumbo.

#2030: Myojo Charumera Artificial Tonkotsu Shouyu Flavor

Here’s another one sent by Colin – thanks, man! I’m a big fan of tonkotsu ramen – I would say it probably my favorite variety of the Japanese dish. Rich pork bone broth with a creamy and milky look and mouthfeel. Ahhh… Let’s check this one out!

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains fish. To prepare, add noodle block to 2 cups boiling water and cook for 3 minutes stirring occasionally. Add in powder seasoning and stir. Add in liquid seasoning. Stir and enjoy!

The noodle block.

Powder soup base.

Fluffy powder.

A liquid seasoning sachet.

Oil.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, spring onion and chashu pork. The noodles are of nice gauge and chewiness. The broth is a thinner one for tonkotsu, but it has a very nice and creamy pork taste to it with a nice bit of shoyu. 3.75 out of 5.0 stars.

Myojo Charumera Tonkotsu Ramen, 17.6 Ounce

A Myojo Charumera TV spot.

#1446: Myojo Ippei-Chan Jumbo Night Market Style Yakisoba

To start off, thanks to Raissa T. and Andre L. for their help on translating! Today feels like a yakisoba day. I really like yakisoba! It’s a pretty versatile dish; you can add anything to it and it’s still good! Well, strawberry jelly probably isn’t the best add-in… Then again, with that mention perhaps someone will try it and make it the new craze? The latest weird add-in craze was adding those little pudding cups or flan into a Cup Noodle. Bizarre… Well, let’s see how this comes out – looks good on the package! Especially with the amazingly cool little recommendation to…

Enjoy Mayo Beam! Japanese mayo is pretty awesome stuff! I used to rave about Best Foods/Hellman’s, but that Kewpie stuff is top-notch. I thought that Japan was the biggest consumer of mayonnaise, but it turns out the Russian love the stuff – they eat more of it than any other country in the world! What’s interesting too is that a component of yakisoba sauce is Worcestershire sauce, which also is a European thing. Trippy. Let’s dig in!

Her’s the distributor/import sticker (click image to enlarge). Not sure if it contains meat as the label is very light, but it probably does.

Side panel details (click image to enlarge).

The lid (click image to enlarge). To prepare, remove sachets. Add in boiling water to line and re-cover for 3 minutes. Use the orange spout to drain. Add sachet contents and enjoy!

The noodle block.

Bits of cabbage and maybe meat from the bottom of the tray.

The yakisoba sauce sachet.

Has a sweet and Worcestershire scent.

Furikake is mentioned on the front, so I’m guessing that’s what this is.

Furikake is a seasoning often added as a condiment for rice with sesame seeds and seaweed and other tasty bits.

All hail the mayo beam!

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added green onion, bean sprout, sauteed beef and sweet onion. The noodles were your standard tray yakisoba noodle – but with a huge quantity. I would say this was the most food from a noodle tray I’ve seen yet! Unfortunately, although tasty, it didn’t seem that there was enough yakisoba sauce really; the flavor could have been a little stronger. The furikake was a nice touch though, and the mayo beam gave the meal a ray of light! The cabbage and meaty bits hydrated perfectly. 4.5 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 4902881404532.

Yakisoba! Yakisoba!

#1416: Myojo Chukazanmai Szechuan Style Miso

Here’s an interesting one. Myojo does this premium Chukazanmai line and there are quite a few different varieties! This one has me a little worried though. I haven’t really liked Szechuan style much of anything in the past. Hopefully this will turn the tide! Let’s check it out.

The distributor’s sticker (click image to enlarge). Contains chicken and shrimp.

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). To prepare, add noodles to 600ml boiling water for 4 minutes. Add contents of sachets and stir. Enjoy!

The premium noodle block.

The powder base sachet.

A light, granular concoction.

The liquid sachet.

Has a Szechuan scent. Hmm.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). The noodles were quite nice – they had some serious chewiness and a feel of higher quality than many. The flavor however wasn’t the greatest. It had a miso side of things and a funky Szechuan soy and chilli flavor that just felt greasy and funky to me. I could see some people liking it, but just not my kind of thing. 2.0 out of 5.0 stars.UPC bar code 4902881052313.

A Myojo Chukazanmai TV commercial from Japan!

#1103: Myojo Ippei-chan Yomise No Yakisoba Teriyaki Mayo Flavor

So today’s noodles were sent to me by Ichiro Yamato, proprietor of Yakantei over in Japan! He specializes in interesting and hard to find instant noodles – thank you very much. Today is a special day around here for a couple of reasons.

Today’s my wife and I’s third wedding anniversary! We went up to Anacortes, Washington (my hometown) on the Fourth of July and took this pic at a beach right next to where I grew up. Happy Anniversary, Kitten! I love you!

Some of you may have noticed there haven’t been any posts in the past few days, and the people who follow The Ramen Rater on facebook will know why. Alas, my computer decided to stop living – the power supply and video card both went out at about the same time. I decided to ask people on the facebook page if someone could help.

Not two minutes after I posted the call for help, a fellow by the name of Kam Desai offered to help! Before I knew it, he’d sent the parts and they arrived yesterday! Wow! Thank you so much, Kam! I have a box all ready for you – he’s a fan of hot and spicy and this box is jam packed full of spicy goodness!

Now my computer is back to life thanks to Kam. Kam runs an IT company in North Carolina – it’s called Silicon Solutions, Inc – check out his site!

Details from the cellophane outer covering (click image to enlarge).

The lid (click image to enlarge).

The noodle block.

Some of the veggies that were hiding under the noodle block.

The bigger seasoning powder packet.

Not sure exactly what kind of seasoning this one was, but it looked like a dry herb mix.

The front and back of the wondrous mayonnaise packet!

We decided to go to the Japanese Garden in Seattle today – kind of fits the noodles eh?

Even Andy liked it!

You can get little cups of food to toss to the massive Koi swimming around – pretty nice place on a beautiful summer day. Back to the review!

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added kamaboko, green onion and Urashima Sesame & Salt furikake. The noodles are thin and light with a soft chew to them and slight crumble to the texture. The flavor is semi-light with a bit of a teriyaki flavor. The mayonnaise somehow mystically binds everything together and gives it that ‘greasy noodle’ niceness which I find delectable. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. 4902881404549.

A nice assortment of older Japanese instant noodle commercials from various brands.