Tag Archives: 농심

#2533: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black (SK Version)

#2533: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black (SK Version) - South Korea - The Ramen Rater

So for a long time, I’ve wanted to review the South Korean version of Shin Ramyun Black, and I know lots of people have wanted me to. Here in the United States, we have Nongshim America (NSA) in Rancho Cucamonga. Anywhere you find Shin Ramyun Black in the United States, it originates in California. However, Nonshim Korea (NSK) is its origin. You can thank Anders and his girlfriend Ji-Min from South Korea for sending this along! Thanks again! Here’s a little something about the Shin from Wikipedia –

Shin Ramyun/Ramyeon is a brand of instant noodle (including cup ramyeon) that is produced by a South Korean food company Nongshim since October, 1986. It is now exported to over 100 countries, and is the highest selling instant noodle brand in South Korea.

Shin Ramyun is well known for its spicy flavor. It is produced in two kinds: Shin Ramyun,[1] the original one, and Shin Ramyun Black,[2] which was introduced in 2011. A standard package of Shin Ramyun consists of noodles, a sachet of flavoring powder (soup base), and a sachet of vegetable flakes. Shin Ramyun Black contains extra beef stock soup.

Shin Ramyun was introduced in October 1986 by Nongshim. The Nongshim R&D team came up with the idea of Sogogijanguk, a Cabbage and Beef Stew, which is one of the most popular traditional South Korean dishes.[3]

After Shin Ramyun was introduced, Nongshim’s market share hit 46.3% in 1987, and exceeded 50% for the first time in 1988 (53.8%).[4] With the market share of over 20% just by itself, Shin Ramyun is a leading brand of the instant noodles in Korea.

In 2015, Shin Ramyun has achieved 28 billion units sold since it was first introduced.[5] Shin Ramyun is listed on the National Brand Consumption Index (NBCI)[6] as the number 1 brand in South Korea (2012~2016) for its brand awareness and brand power.[7]

The name of Shin Ramyun is from a Chinese character Shin (), which means “spicy.” Shin Ramyun uses red and black packaging with the emphasized calligraphic word “辛”.[3] The meaning of the Chinese character is shown on the background of the package. Nongshim decided to emphasize the Chinese character Shin (辛) for their brand with a belief that a single Chinese character delivers the brand image better than written in Korean. Additionally, the character is the surname of both the founder of Nongshim and his elder brother, who started Lotte.

Ok bam there’s a little snippet of info. Indeed, Shin Ramyun is quite a phenomenon in the instant noodle world. Let’s check out it’s new companion, Shin Ramyun Black.

Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black – South Korea

#2533: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black (SK Version) - South Korea - The Ramen Rater

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). I think this contains beef. To prepare, add everything into a pot with 550ml boiling water and cook for 4 1/2 minutes. Finall,y stir and enjoy!

#2533: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black (SK Version) - South Korea - The Ramen Rater

The round noodle block.

#2533: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black (SK Version) - South Korea - The Ramen Rater

The powder base.

#2533: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black (SK Version) - South Korea - The Ramen Rater

A lot of powder here.

#2533: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black (SK Version) - South Korea - The Ramen Rater

The sul-long tang powder.

#2533: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black (SK Version) - South Korea - The Ramen Rater

Light and powdery with a pleasant scent.

#2533: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black (SK Version) - South Korea - The Ramen Rater

The vegetables sachet.

#2533: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black (SK Version) - South Korea - The Ramen Rater

A groovy mixture.

#2533: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black (SK Version) - South Korea - The Ramen Rater

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, stewed beef and egg. The noodles hydrated very nicely – good thickness and chew – excellent ramyun. The broth is quite good. You have the spicy side and the smooth side – kind of creamy Shin Ramyun with garlic; more savory. The vegetables they include hydrate well. Very good! 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code

#2533: Nongshim Shin Ramyun Black (SK Version) - South Korea - The Ramen Rater

Original Korea Nongshim Shin Black Noodle Soup (Pack of 4)

A timely Shin Ramyun TV spot

#2523: Nongshim Budae Jjigae Noodle Soup

#2523: Nongshim Budae Jjigae Noodle Soup - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - 농심 보글보글 부대찌개 라면을 먹어봤습니다

Here’s one I found at the local HMart a couple months ago. I’ve had a budae jjigae instant once before – I know there’s at least one more variety out there… Very curious how this one is. Let’s see what Wikipedia has to say about budae jjigae –

Budae-jjigae[1] (부대찌개; literally “troop stew”) or sausage stew[1] is a type of jjigae (a thick Korean soup similar to a Western stew). Soon after the Korean War, food was scarce in Seoul, South Korea. Some people made use of surplus foods from U.S. military bases around the Uijeongbu area, Pyeongtaek area (also called Songtan)[2] or Munsan area, such as hot dogs, Spam, or ham, and incorporated them into a traditional spicy soup flavored with gochujang (red chili paste) and kimchi.

Uijeongbu Budaejjigae-Street
Budae jjigae is still popular in South Korea. The dish often incorporates such modern ingredients as instant noodles and sliced American cheese. Other ingredients may include ground beef, sliced sausages, baked beans, minari, onions, green onions, tteok, tofu, chili peppers, macaroni, garlic, mushrooms, and other vegetables in season.[3]

Alright – let’s get started.

Nongshim Budae Jjigae Noodle Soup – South Korea

#2523: Nongshim Budae Jjigae Noodle Soup - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - 농심 보글보글 부대찌개 라면을 먹어봤습니다

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains fish. To prepare, add noodle block and sachets to 500ml boiling water. Cook for 4 1/2 minutes. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2523: Nongshim Budae Jjigae Noodle Soup - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - 농심 보글보글 부대찌개 라면을 먹어봤습니다

The noodle block.

#2523: Nongshim Budae Jjigae Noodle Soup - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - 농심 보글보글 부대찌개 라면을 먹어봤습니다

The soup base sachet.

#2523: Nongshim Budae Jjigae Noodle Soup - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - 농심 보글보글 부대찌개 라면을 먹어봤습니다

A tan colored mixture.

#2523: Nongshim Budae Jjigae Noodle Soup - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - 농심 보글보글 부대찌개 라면을 먹어봤습니다

The vegetables sachet.

#2523: Nongshim Budae Jjigae Noodle Soup - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - 농심 보글보글 부대찌개 라면을 먹어봤습니다

Quite the mix here.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, yaki kamaboko, and salami. These noodles were excellent – nice and chewy with a pleasant gumminess and gauge. This is the kind of ramyun I adore! The bro has a lightly spicy hit and has a really rounded flavor; reminds me of pork and beans and hot dogs – with a nice dose of kimchi taste. The garnish includes decent pieces of kimchi as well and these pieces that are very much like slices of hot dog, however, remind me of fish cake too. 4.5 out of 5.0 stars.  UPC bar code 031146037780.

#2523: Nongshim Budae Jjigae Noodle Soup - South Korea - The Ramen Rater - 농심 보글보글 부대찌개 라면을 먹어봤습니다

Nongshim Budae Jigae Noodle Soup, 4.48 Ounce Unit (Pack of 4)

A TV advert for this one

#2356: Nongshim Spicy Shrimp Cup Noodle

#2356: Nongshim Spicy Shrimp Cup Noodle - South Korea - The Ramen Rater -  instant noodles

I’ve had the export version in the past but this is the version that Koreans eat in South Korea. I picked this up in Taipei at a Carrefour store. I’d never been to one before and really didn’t know anything about them other than that I knew they existed in Taiwan. Here’s some info from Wikipedia –

Carrefour S.A. (French pronunciation: ​[kaʁfuʁ]) is a French multinational retailer headquartered in Boulogne Billancourt, France, in the Hauts-de-Seine Department near Paris.[2] It is one of the largest hypermarket chains in the world (with close to 1,600 hypermarkets at the end of 2015). Carrefour operates in more than 30 countries, in Europe, the Americas, Asia and Africa. Carrefour means “crossroads” and “public square” in French. The company is a component of the Euro Stoxx 50 stock market index.[3]

In 1989, Carrefour became the first international retailer to establish a presence in Asia when it entered Taiwan through a joint venture with Uni President Enterprises Corporation. It leveraged the experience it gathered in Taiwan to expand into other Asian markets.

Apparently there are 87 of them in Taiwan. We call them supermarkets here, but overseas they’re known as hypermarkets. Shrimp! Let’s take a gander.

Nongshim Spicy Shrimp Cup Noodle – South Korea

#2356: Nongshim Spicy Shrimp Cup Noodle - South Korea - The Ramen Rater -  instant noodles

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains shrimp. To prepare, add in sachet contents. Add boiling water to fill line and cover for 3 minutes. Stir and enjoy!

#2356: Nongshim Spicy Shrimp Cup Noodle - South Korea - The Ramen Rater -  instant noodles

Detail of the lid (click to enlarge).

#2356: Nongshim Spicy Shrimp Cup Noodle - South Korea - The Ramen Rater -  instant noodles

The noodle block.

#2356: Nongshim Spicy Shrimp Cup Noodle - South Korea - The Ramen Rater -  instant noodles

Loose vegetables and shrimp from the cup.

#2356: Nongshim Spicy Shrimp Cup Noodle - South Korea - The Ramen Rater -  instant noodles

The soup base sachet.

#2356: Nongshim Spicy Shrimp Cup Noodle - South Korea - The Ramen Rater -  instant noodles

A spicy mixture.

#2356: Nongshim Spicy Shrimp Cup Noodle - South Korea - The Ramen Rater -  instant noodles

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, shrimp, spring onion and chilli flake. The noodles hydrated well and were of good quality – soft and definitely upright citizens. The broth was very nice – good shrimp hit and spicy hit, and definitely Korean. The included bits hydrated very well. 4.0 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 8801043015776.

#2356: Nongshim Spicy Shrimp Cup Noodle - South Korea - The Ramen Rater -  instant noodles

Nongshim Easy Meals Spicy S h r i m p Noodle Cup, 2.36 Ounce (Pack of 6)

A Nongshim Spicy Shrimp TV spot.

#1827: Nongshim Zha Wang (Jjawang) Noodles With Chajang Sauce

Being a superfan of all things instant noodle, I have newsfeeds I check daily on my phone pertaining to them. I saw an article about Nongshim’s Jjawang in the Korea Times New York edition. It mentioned with it’s release, jjajang variants are flying off the shelves in NY and NJ. I figured hey – I better find this stuff!

I had an idea where to look. In Lynnwood, WA, there’s a store called G Mart. They usually have a Nongshim promo at the front and sure enough, they did. We also had my friend Paul S. over last night and he brought some Heaven Sent fried chicken. I had bought some Nongshim Waffle snacks (they taste like maple syrup and crunchy waffle) and they went together well. Now, what’s jjajang? Here’s something from wikipedia:

Jajangmyeon (자장면; 짜장면; jjajangmyeon), a Korean Chinese cuisine, is a noodle dish topped with a thick sauce made of chunjang (a salty black soybean paste when unheated), diced pork and vegetables, and sometimes also seafood. Jajang (alternately spelled jjajang), the name of the sauce when heated, is the Korean pronunciation of the Chinese characters , which literally means “fried sauce.” Myeon (also spelledmyun) means “noodle”, which is represented by the Chinese character .

The dish originated from zhajiangmian (, literally “fried sauce noodles”) in China’s Shandong region. [1] Zhajiangmian was adapted in Korea to fit the Korean taste. The start of jajangmyeon can be traced back to theJoseon Dynasty. When the Joseon opened the Incheon port, many Chinese people from the Shandong region moved to a town in Incheon, which is now known as Incheon China Town.[2] These people created Chinese restaurants and adapted the traditional Shandong food zhajiangmian in a way that Korean people could enjoy. It is rumored that in 1905 a Chinese restaurant named Gonghwacheun (공화춘), created jajangmyeon. However, it turned out that Gonghwacheun was the first registered business.[3] At this time jajangmyeon was a cheap dish that the worker class enjoyed and was more similar to Shandong region’s zhajiangmian than the current day Korean jajamyeon. After the Korean War, Korean chunjang was invented. With Korean chunjang, caramel was added to give it a sweet taste. After this jajangmyeon became a completely different food from zhajiangmian.[4] The pronunciation of the dish’s name is nearly identical to that of its Korean counterpart. But Korean jajangmyeon differs from Chinese zhajiangmian, as Korean jjajangmyeon uses black Korean chunjangincluding caramel, and onions.[citation needed]

Alright – with your education complete, let’s check out this new Nongshim Zha Wang!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Contains shrimp. To prepare, add noodle and flake sachet to 600ml boiling water and cook 5 minutes, stirring occasionally, As it cooks, make the sauce by adding 3 tablespoons of water (45ml) and stirring. Drain noodles. Add in the contents of the oil sachet. Add prepared sauce and combine thoroughly. Enjoy!

Broad, flat noodles. There are little specks of kelp powder in them.

The sauce powder sachet.

Has a nice black bean scent.

The vegetable flake sachet.

A nice mixture of vegetables.

An oil sachet.

Vegetable oil.

Finished. The noodles are out of this world – soft and chewy, with a nice width and thickness – very hearty. The sauce coats everything and there’s more than enough of it. It has a rich black bean flavor augmented with peas, cabbage and other veggies. This is the best jjajang I’ve ever tried. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 031146033324.

Korean Nong Shim Ramen Jjawang/zzawang (Pack of 8)

A TV spot from South Korea for Nongshim Zha Wang.

#1824: Nongshim Soon Veggie Noodle Soup

I’ve seen this one online a few times recently, but never in the store – until a couple of weeks ago, that is! I really liked the pack version of this one – made the 2014 Top Ten Instant Noodles Of All Time list – the first vegetarian one to do so. The pack was made in South Korea – but this cup is made here in the United States at Nongshim America down in sunny Rancho Cucamonga, California. I went and visited Nongshim America in 2012 – was really neat – big factory and nice people! Let’s check out this cup and see how it compares to the pack version.

Detail of the side panels (click image to enlarge). Vegan friendly! To prepare in a microwave, remove lid and add in sachet contents. Add room temp water to fill line and microwave at 1000W for 3 minutes. Stir and enjoy!

Detail of the lid.

The noodle block.

The soup base sachet.

Has a nice scent – kind of a slight spicy beef.

Some of the vegetables loose in the cup – there was quite a bit more.

Finished. The noodles came out perfectly – a nice and soft texture to them with just the right backbone. The broth is reminiscent of Shin Ramyun, albeit almost completely devoid of spiciness. The vegetables were exceptional – rarely do I review a cup whose kernels of corn actually taste fresh – but this one did that – and the large mushroom pieces were great as well. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 031146027033.

Nongshim Soon Cup Veggie Noodles, 2.6 Ounce (Pack of 6)

A Nongshim Veggie Noodle Soup commercial from South Korea.

#1593: Nongshim Tteokgukmyun

This one came from Anders E., a reader in South Korea – thanks! He mentioned that this variety is often enjoyed on Korean New Year, and since that was a couple days ago, I thought I’d have it today. Here’s a little info about how it fits in with Lunar New Year celebrations from wikipedia:

The origin of eating tteokguk on New Year’s Day is unknown. However, tteokguk is mentioned in the 19th century book of customs Dongguksesigi (동국세시기, 東國歲時記) as being made with beef or pheasant used as the main ingredient for the broth, and pepper added as seasoning.[2] The book also mentions the custom of having a bowl of tteokguk in the morning of New Year’s Day to get a year older, and the custom of saying “How many bowls of tteokguk have you eaten?” to ask a person’s age.[3]

In the book The Customs of Joseon written in 1946 by historian Choe Nam-seon, the New Year custom of eating tteokguk is speculated as being originated from ancient times. The white tteok signifying purity and cleanliness would be eaten as a ritual to start off the New Year for good fortune.[3]

In Korea, on Lunar New Year’s Day, a family performs ancestral rites by serving tteokguk to their ancestors during a joint meal.[4] Although tteokguk is traditionally a seasonal dish, it is now eaten at all times of the year.

Happy Lunar New Year! Let’s have some tteokgukmyun!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Not sure whether it contains beef or not, but I’m guessing it does. To prepare, add everything to 500ml boiling water and cook for 4 minutes. Enjoy!

The rice noodle block.

The soup base sachet.

Has a rich beef scent.

The vegetables sachet.

Lots of mushroom in there!

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). The noodles are made of rice and are broad with a nice chewiness. The broth is quite good – it has a nice beef flavor with a nice thickness as well as a little hint of spiciness. The vegetables hydrated perfectly. 4.25 out of 5.0 stars.EAN bar code 8801043023399.

Nongshim Ramen Flavor Combo, Shin Noodle Ramyun, Chappagetti, Neoguri, Anseung Tangmyun, 20-count

#1515: Nongshim Neoguri Udon Seafood & Mild

It’s a really cold day today and I think a big bowl of seafood noodles sound good. This is a Nongshim Neoguri I got up in Canada. It’s made in South Korea and it’s the milder version of Neoguri. Raccoons I say raccoons! Why do I say raccoons? Well, check out the video at the end of the post – it’ll all become clear I think. Let’s dig in to some Nongshim Neoguri!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Contains fish. To prepare, add all package contents to 550ml boiling water and cook 4-5 minutes. Enjoy!

The noodle block.

The soup base sachet.

Has a nice seafoody scent.

The vegetables sachet.

Bits of seafood and vegetable.

A nice big piece of seaweed. Some people have mentioned that this is not to be eaten, but just as a seasoning. I grew up on an island and miss it a lot, so I tend to eat it. Call me crazy (many do) but it makes me feel like a kid again.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added sweet onion, kamaboko, narutomaki, shrimp, sliced squid, sliced green onion and egg. The noodles are indeed very broad and have a nice chewiness to them. The broth is indeed on the mild side compared to a lot of South Korean noodle soups. It does has a nice and rich seafood flavor, just not all the spice. The vegetable bits hydrated nicely. The seaweed? Soft and quite tasty. A nice well rounded bowl of South Korean seafood udon! 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.UPC bar code 031146150205.

This is pretty neat – you can get 5 each of Shin Ramyun, Neoguri, Ansungtangmyun and Chapagetti – pretty awesome if you’d like to immerse yourself in South Korean ramyun for a while!

This is a song that they made about raccoons. Why raccoons? Well, Neoguri means raccoon. Why? I’m not exactly sure – but you can find out more Neoguri info here.

#1308: Nongshim Soon Veggie Noodle Soup

Here’s a new one from Nongshim for the vegetable crown. At first, I thought it would be a tofu based variety; the reason was that I’ve gone to a local Korean restaurant and ordered ‘Soon Tofu’ a few times, which is a spicy soup with tofu in it. Well, ‘soon’ translates to ‘soft.’ Well, tofu is a vegetarian friendly construct, so I thought I’d give it a try today with this new one. A few people have been asking about this one, so with that, let’s check it out.

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). This is Vegan friendly. To prepare, boil 500ml water and add noodles and sachet contents. Cook for 4 – 5 minutes stirring every once in a while. Eat!

The noodle block.

Soup base sachet.

A light powder with a nice scent.

The vegetable sachet.

A colorful mix.

Prep, prep, prep… We hit the local Boo Han Market nearby for vegetables last night. All sorts of things I’d never seen before – green onions the size of leeks! Huge bags of peeled garlic! Something called Gobo that looked like a spear for impaling someone! I also was hunting for tofu and found this extra firm ‘tofu cutlet’ which looked pretty good.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added enormous green onion, sweet onion, Fresno pepper, white mushroom, baby bok choy and fried tofu cutlet. The noodles are perfect – nice ramyun gauge and texture I enjoy thoroughly. The broth is very good – especially for a vegetarian skewed variety. Usually I find anything vegetarian to have this, well, funk to it. This doesn’t have that. It’s very reminiscent of Shin Ramyun, yet a little less spicy. Add to it the fact that it isn’t as heavy; while the broth is very rich and tastes very good, it seems somewhat fresher and light. The hydrated veggies did pretty well. All in all, I’m quite impressed – best Vegan instant ever. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 031146022823.

I’m not sure what they’re conversing about, but it’s pretty interesting!

Chapaguri: A Popular New Recipe In South Korea!

I’ve heard of recipes people make where they combine two different types of instant noodles to make something new. Well, here’s one from South Korea that is very popular right now! Chapaguri! 짜파구리 !

As I’m sure you can guess, it’s a combination of Nongshim’s Chapagetti Chajang Noodles and Nongshim’s Neoguri Spicy Seafood Udon. I got the recipe from Nongshim’s South Korean website here.

What I get is that you cook the noodles, add the veggies from the white packets, drain the water off except for about a ladle-full, then add the seasonings and stir. Finally, stir fry for a minute or so, adding the oil packet. Voila – Chapaguri! There is a difference between the Neoguri and Chapagetti made in the US, but it’s not big. In the recipe, you’ll see a little piece of seaweed – that’s not included in the Neoguri made here. With that, let’s check this out!

Here’s a video I made showing the process of making Chapaguri with instructions that I made.

Here are the two noodle blocks.

Packets aplenty!

Seasonings ready to go!

Finished (click image to enlarge). Excellent! Like a spicy seafood jjajang! They mention adding fried egg and cucumber, but I would also think that a little thin sliced beef and odeng would go well with it – also some onion would be nice. Of course, kimchi would go very nicely with it too.

Re-Review: Nongshim Potato Noodle Soup

I’ve been wanting to re-review this one for a while, and so here we are. Potato noodles! Chewy! Let’s check it out.

Here’s the back of the packaging (click image to enlarge).

A pretty massive block of noodles! Taste pretty good raw.

The powder seasoning.

Smells good!

A big veggie packet.

Interesting…

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added some kimchi, baked chicken, sweet onion and an egg. The noodles are indeed chewier than the normal Nongshim package noodles. They’re also slightly gelatinous like bean thread. They’re quite good though and unique. The broth is light – and tasty. Not really spicy; more of a vegetable broth. The veggies taste nice too. Good stuff! 3.5 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 031146157792.

Here’s a South Korean commercial for Potato Noodles!