Tag Archives: summer

#1105: Nongshim Doong Ji Authentic Korean Cold Noodles With Chili Sauce

Here’s one that I’ve waiting to review for a while. This is a variety specifically marketed for the summer months – cold South Korean noodles! Thought I’d consult Wikipedia to give some more information on South Korean cold noodle dishes:

Bibim guksu, a cold dish made with very thin wheat flour noodles called somyeon with added flavorings, is one of the most popular traditional noodle dishes in Korean cuisine. It is also called guksu bibim or goldong myeon, all of which literally mean “stirred noodles” or “mixed noodles”. [1] The dish is especially popular during summer.

There are many kinds of cold noodle dishes in Korea, including one made with cold beef broth; however, spicy cold noodles have historically been appreciated by spice-loving people in Korea and recognized internationally. What makes this dish so distinct from other cold noodle dishes from different cultures is the strong spicy flavor produced from the combination of red pepper powder, gochujang, and minced garlic, along with a sweet-and-sour flavor created by vinegar and sugar. Most spicy cold noodles are prepared with haszing duu and a slight touch of sesame oil to enhance the richness of its flavor.

Typically the dish would be prepared by stir frying diced beef, julienned pickled cucumbers, and mushrooms in sesame oil, which is all mixed together with the cooked noodles, soy sauce, sesame oil, sesame seeds and sugar. Garnishes placed on top and around the spicy noodles include hard-boiled eggs, pickled mu, dried gim strips, sliced cucumbers, and sometimes sliced Korean pear or tomato.[1][2]

Sounds like something that’d be great today – supposed to be pretty warm! Let’s give it a try.

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Contains wheat, soybean and pollock.

Buckwheat gives these noodles their dark brown color. Usually when you order naengmyeon, another cold noodle dish, it is served at a restaurant with a pair of scissors to cut the noodles into manageable lengths – works well here as well.

The veggies and solid ingredients.

The larger bits are the Korean pear.

The chili sauce packet.

Nice color and a spicy scent.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added green onion, hard boiled egg, roast beef and a little sliced kimchi on the side. The noodles are nice – they have a chewiness you can only get from buckwheat and chillling them makes their texture tighten up – only words I can think to describe. The flavoring is great – spicy and slightly sweet – and there more than enough of the sauce to coat all the noodles. The pear is great too – chewy and flavorful. All in all quite nice! 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 031146158164.

Gol Bim Men Recipe – Paldo Bibim Men with Bai-Top Shell

Today, I’m trying a new recipe sent to me by the folks at Paldo! Summer is right around the corner and this cold noodle dish is great to enjoy during the warmer months of the year. It was first introduced on a South Korean TV show on the KBS network called ‘Happy Together’ (click here to see the video). It uses some ingredients I’ve never heard of before, but I’m sure the folks in South Korea are very familiar with them – Cho Gochujang and Bai-Top Shell. Cho Gochujang is a gochujang infused with vinegar. But what’s bai-top you ask? Sea snails! Never had snails from the sea or otherwise before. Thank you to Moses over at Paldo America for sending me everything to make this! Always excited to try something new.

Here’s a video I made of how to create this simple and refreshing dish.

Gol-Bim-Men (골빔면)

Ingredients:

  • Paldo Bibim Men
  • Bai-Top Shell (in the recipe I’m using a can of Dongwon Canned Bai-Top Shell (hot))
  • Cucumber
  • 1 tsp Cho Gochujang (I’m using Ottogi)
  • 1/2 tsp Sesame Oil

Directions:

  1. Prepare the cucumber, slice into long pieces
  2. To prepare the Bai-Top Shell, slice into thin pieces. 5 prepared Bai-Top per pack of Bibim Men works here.
  3. Combine cucumber, sliced Bai-Top Shell, Bibim Men Sauce Pack, Cho Gochujang, Sesame oil.
  4. Add the mixture to the noodles and stir well. Enjoy!

Here’s the finished product (click image to enlarge). This is really quite good! The Bai-Top shell was extremely good – I hadn’t a clue that I would like sea snail! Also commonly known as whelk, it has a chewy texture not unlike clams. These canned ones were in a slightly spicy sauce which was really good. Paired with the cho gochujang, I devoured the leftovers of the can after the video.The sweet and spicy flavors along with the coolness of cucumber and texture of the bai-top all melded together very nicely. Give it a try!