Tag Archives: seleraku

#909: Indomie Mi Goreng Kriuuk Bawang

This is the final one – the last one that my friend from Jakarta, Indonesia sent. These have been a lot of fun since there’s no way you can buy them here in the states! Awesome! Thanks again! So what does bawang mean? Onion. And what about kriuuk? Crunchy. Let’s try this out.

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge).

A big chunk of the noodle block.

Bumbu? Seasoning powder!

Looks like a decent amount.

Liquid seasonings: seasoned oil, chili sauce and sweet soy sauce.

The seasoning oil has a nice onion aroma.

The chili sauce and sweet soy sauce.

Here’s the star of the show: the crunchy bits!

Kind of look like Rice Krispies, no? Well, they definitely end their resemblance with the visual – they’re spicy, crunchy little bits of enjoyment.

Thought I’d take a shot of them all together to really show what we have. This is a lot of extra stuff to go with a block of instant noodles; Indomie’s really quite unique in this.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added sweet onion, bell pepper, carrot, broccoli, green bean, water chestnut, baby corn, some baked chicken with Lindberg-Snider Red Baron BBQ Spice, a couple fried eggs with some Krazy Mixed Up salt, Dua Beliibis chili sauce and Urashima Sesame & Salt furikake. The noodles are trademark Indomie – nice chew and good quantity. The flavor is nice – the sweet and spicy is there as well as a nice hit of onion. The kriuuk? Well, it’s crunchy and abundant – almost too much of it! Good stuff – 4.25 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 089686059748 .

Indomie TV commercial

The Gong Ageng – turn up the bass and the volume – this is amazing!

#730: Meet The Manufacturer: Indomie Mi Instan Rasa Soto Banjar Limau Kuit Khas Kalimantan Selatan

Okay so here’s another soup – Soto Banjar. First off, here’s what Wikipedia says about Soto:

Soto, sroto, tauto or coto is a common dish, found in many regional variations of Indonesian cuisine. It is a traditional soup mainly composed of broth, meat and vegetables. There is no clear definition of what makes a soto, but normally many traditional soups are called soto, whereas foreign and Western influenced soups are called sop. Soto is sometimes considered Indonesia’s national dish, as it is served from Sumatra to Papua, in a wide range of variations. Soto is omnipresent in Indonesia, available in many an open-air eateries and on many street corners to fine dining restaurants and luxurious hotels.[1] Soto, especially soto ayam (chicken soto), is considered as Indonesian counterpart of chicken soup. Soto is a comforting soup,[2] because it is always served warm with tender texture in most of Indonesian households, and naturally considered as Indonesian comfort food.[3][4]

But what about the Banjar variety?

Banjar soto, spiced with star anise, clove, cassia and lemongrass and sour hot sambal, accompanied with potato cakes.

So this is a type of Indonesian soup from the capitol of South Kalimantan. Let’s give it a try!

Here’s the back of the packaging (click image to enlarge).

The noodle block is ready to absorb and assimilate liquid!

Our regular dry packets – dry powder on the left and chili powder on the right.

Here’s the seasoning powder and a little chili powder in the middle.

The liquids and garnish. Seasoned oil, kecap manis (sweet soy sauce) and fried onions.

A lighter colored oil – often these have been a cream color or a darker color. This one’s a little lighter and more transparent.

Thick, black and sweet, the soy sauce gives a nice sugary taste. Raw, it’s a bit like molasses.

Fried onions go on at the very end on top of everything.

Solid ingredients packet. What’s inside?

This reminds me of what’s in the Special versions that are sold in the US. It’s a veggie mix.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added a hard boiled egg with some Krazy Mixed Up Salt and some pepper, a little Kizami Shoga (pickled ginger) and some of my stir-fry mix made from veggies we got at Country Farms. Oh and a little chicken lunch meat. This was absolutely exquisite! The noodles are great and the broth has a sweet, spicy and deep flavor – this is great stuff! Hints of cinnamon and spices are rampant – this is really enjoyable! Perfect – 5.0 out of 5.0 stars – best Indomie soup I’ve tried yet! UPC bar code 089686011692 .

Floating market in Banjar!

This group, Nasida Ria, was in a compilation of Indonesian music.

#728: Meet The Manufacturer: Indomie Mi Instan Rasa Kari Ayam Medan Khas Sumatera Utara (Medan Chicken Curry)

Here’s another one of the regional special varieties that Indomie makes. This one’s chicken curry from Medan, a city in Indonesia. Let’s give it a try! By the way – check out the interview I did with Indomie here!

Here’s the back of the packaging (click image to enlarge).

The noodle block awaits the bath of boiling water.

The very familiar Indomie packet combo – powdered seasoning on the left and chili powder on the right.

IHere’s the contents of the packets – I only used part of the chili powder.

A big packet of seasoned oil.

Has a sweet scent.

Finally, the finishing touch – the garnish! Fried onions! Slightly more than usual.

These add a nice little crunch.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added some local veggies from the Country Farms produce stand, a little chicken lunch meat and a bit of kizami shoga (pickled ginger).  Ohhh I do enjoy curry! The noodles are great – good firmness and good amount of them. The broth is awesome – a great curry flavor – rich and tasty! The fried onion on top of everything adds a nice little crunch. This is where it’s at curry fans! 5.0 out of 5.0 stars! UPC bar code 089686011166 – althought you can’t get this one in the United States, there is an Indomie variety that is curry flavored called Rasa Kari Ayam – no Medan in the title but very good stuff. You can get it in the US, too – here it is.

This guy has a great Indonesian Kari Ayam recipe! Check it out!

Indonesian Food Safari!