Tag Archives: naengmyeon

#1105: Nongshim Doong Ji Authentic Korean Cold Noodles With Chili Sauce

Here’s one that I’ve waiting to review for a while. This is a variety specifically marketed for the summer months – cold South Korean noodles! Thought I’d consult Wikipedia to give some more information on South Korean cold noodle dishes:

Bibim guksu, a cold dish made with very thin wheat flour noodles called somyeon with added flavorings, is one of the most popular traditional noodle dishes in Korean cuisine. It is also called guksu bibim or goldong myeon, all of which literally mean “stirred noodles” or “mixed noodles”. [1] The dish is especially popular during summer.

There are many kinds of cold noodle dishes in Korea, including one made with cold beef broth; however, spicy cold noodles have historically been appreciated by spice-loving people in Korea and recognized internationally. What makes this dish so distinct from other cold noodle dishes from different cultures is the strong spicy flavor produced from the combination of red pepper powder, gochujang, and minced garlic, along with a sweet-and-sour flavor created by vinegar and sugar. Most spicy cold noodles are prepared with haszing duu and a slight touch of sesame oil to enhance the richness of its flavor.

Typically the dish would be prepared by stir frying diced beef, julienned pickled cucumbers, and mushrooms in sesame oil, which is all mixed together with the cooked noodles, soy sauce, sesame oil, sesame seeds and sugar. Garnishes placed on top and around the spicy noodles include hard-boiled eggs, pickled mu, dried gim strips, sliced cucumbers, and sometimes sliced Korean pear or tomato.[1][2]

Sounds like something that’d be great today – supposed to be pretty warm! Let’s give it a try.

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Contains wheat, soybean and pollock.

Buckwheat gives these noodles their dark brown color. Usually when you order naengmyeon, another cold noodle dish, it is served at a restaurant with a pair of scissors to cut the noodles into manageable lengths – works well here as well.

The veggies and solid ingredients.

The larger bits are the Korean pear.

The chili sauce packet.

Nice color and a spicy scent.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added green onion, hard boiled egg, roast beef and a little sliced kimchi on the side. The noodles are nice – they have a chewiness you can only get from buckwheat and chillling them makes their texture tighten up – only words I can think to describe. The flavoring is great – spicy and slightly sweet – and there more than enough of the sauce to coat all the noodles. The pear is great too – chewy and flavorful. All in all quite nice! 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 031146158164.

#748: Naengmyeon Combo at Hosoonyi In Edmonds, WA

Okay I know – I don’t usually review restaurant food but I thought I would this time. After our trip to Nongshim and learning about Korean food and culture, we were curious about this local restaurant. I looked through the menu and decided I should give their noodles a try! I found Naengmyeon combo and thought that might be good. I had no idea what it would be about, except that noodles were involved and that it was ‘good in the Summer.’ Here’s what Wikipedia says about Naengmyeon:

Naengmyeon (hangul: 냉면, naeng-myeon, naengmyun, naeng-myun, meaning “cold noodles”) is a Korean dish of long and thin hand-made noodles made from the flour and starch of various ingredients: buckwheat (메밀, memil), potatoes, sweet potatoes, 칡냉면, naengmyun made with the starch from arrowroot (darker color and chewier than buckwheat noodles), and kudzu (칡, chik). Varieties with ingredients such as seaweed and green tea are available. According to the 19th century documents of Dongguksesigi (동국세시기, 東國歲時記), it has been made since the Joseon Dynasty.[1]

Originally a delicacy in northern Korea, especially the cities of Pyongyang and Hamhung in North Korea, naengmyeon became widely popular in Korea after the Korean War.[1]

Naengmyeon is served in a large stainless bowl with a tangy iced broth, julienned cucumbers, slices of Korean pear, and either a boiled egg or slices of cold boiled beef or both. Spicy Mustard sauce (or Mustard oil) and vinegar are often added before consumption. The long noodles would be eaten without cutting, as they symbolized longevity of life and good health, but modernly, servers at restaurants usually ask if the noodles should be cut prior to eating and use food scissors to cut the noodles.

Cold noodles? Not what I expected but it’s always a good idea to try new things, and so I did.

Being a combo, it came with some nice BBQ short ribs. These were very tasty and quite enjoyable.

Here’s the Naengmyeon. Wow – definitely different. I think these were either buckwheat or sweet potato noodles; not sure. The slushy ice in there was very interesting; and it worked very well! I can see why they would say this is good in the summer – I think it’d be great on a 90+ degree day!

See the color of the noodles? Very different. This was an interesting dish – probably not something I’ll frequent again but not for reasons of poor preparation. This was very nice quality and very nicely presented – but I think suffice it to say that I am not a fan of cold noodles. Nice little restaurant with pretty good service. Check it out if you’re in Edmonds, WA! The noodles get 3.75 out of 5.0 stars.

Here’s a video about Naengmyeon