Tag Archives: kalamansi

The Ramen Rater’s Top Ten Philippines Instant Noodles Of All Time 2018 Edition

The Ramen Rater's Top Ten Philippines Instant Noodles Of All Time 2018 Edition

As I mentioned at the begginning of the Top Ten Japanese list, I have added a little chat option to the site. If I’m available, I can turn it on on my phone and people can ask me questions or comment while they browse the website. Thus far, the most questions and comments are from the Philippines. I thought hey – why isn’t there a top ten Philippines list? I haven’t reviewed many from the Philippines lately and I kind of hope companies in the Philippines that make instant noodles might be interested in having me review their products – if so, please contact me. I would love to do an annual list for the Philippines, however without more reviews, there’s not a whole lot of reason to do so. So let’s have a look! These are my favorite Filipino varieties from the over 2,500 reviews I’ve posted to date.

The Ramen Rater’s Top Ten Philippines Instant Noodles Of All Time 2018 Edition

Video Presentation

This is a presentation of the top ten with commentary by The Ramen Rater.

The Ramen Rater’s Top Ten Philippines Instant Noodles Of All Time 2018 Edition

#10: Lucky Me! Supreme Seafood Flavor Big Cup

#10: Lucky Me! Supreme Seafood Flavor Big Cup

The noodles have a light gauge and chew – there’s a decent amount of them, and they don’t exhibit any mushiness or sponginess. The broth is very luxuriant – kind of a milky and creamy seafood affair. Definitely a comfort food feel to it. Original review

#9: Lucky Me! Beef Na Beef Instant Noodles

#9: Lucky Me! Beef Na Beef Instant Noodles

The noodles have a nice gauge and good texture to them – nice quantity too. The broth has a very beefy flavor – not one brought about like bouillon does but more like stewed beef. The garnish worked just right. If you like beef, you’ll really love this. Original review

#8: Lucky Me! Special Instant Curly Spaghetti With Yummy Red Sauce

#8: Lucky Me! Special Instant Curly Spaghetti With Yummy Red Sauce

The noodles are definitely large gauge – larger than ramyun even. They also have an excellent chewiness to them. The flavor is a sweet tomato sauce which coats everything quite well. Original review

#7: Lucky Me! Pancit Canton (Chow Mein) Original Flavor

#7: Lucky Me! Pancit Canton (Chow Mein) Original Flavor

The noodles have a great gauge and chew. The flavor is like a salty and garlic kind of thing which is really quite enjoyable. The dry component seems to give it an almost chicken kind of sense whereas the oil and sauce lend to it an oiliness and more garlic flavor which round things out. As I’ve said before, this is much like mee goreng and is very good! Original review

#6: Lucky Me! Pancit Canton (Chow Mein) Sweet & Spicy Flavor

#6: Lucky Me! Pancit Canton (Chow Mein) Sweet & Spicy Flavor

The noodles have a nice standard gauge with a light spring. The chew is right for this application. The flavor is like a nice sweet and spicy with butter and salt kind of thing. Original review

#5: Lucky Me! Special Instant Noodles Jjamppong Flavor

#5: Lucky Me! Special Instant Noodles Jjamppong Flavor

The noodles are thin and have a nice lightness to them – much like one would find in a cup noodle but a little different. The broth has a very good spiciness and seafood flavor which I would expect in a jjamppong instant and works well. The solid ingredients hydrated well and were of excellent quality. Original review

#4: Lucky Me! Special Baked Mac Style Instant Macaroni

#4: Lucky Me! Special Baked Mac Style Instant Macaroni

The noodles have a nice shape and chew to them. The sauce is very good – it has a sweetness and tomato flavor and is frequently augmented with bits of textured vegetable protein which are just like little bits of real hamburger. This was a very pleasant surprise. Original review

 

#3: Quickchow Pancit Canton Toyo-Mansi

#3: Quickchow Pancit Canton Toyo-Mansi

Well I must say this is stupendous and wonderful stuff and I could eat it every day.  I like the noodles and the flavor has a kind of spicy and citrus flavor. Original review

#2: Payless Xtra Big Chilimansi Pancit Canton

#2: Payless Xtra Big Chilimansi Pancit Canton

The noodles were awesome and very tasty! A bit of chili flavor, a bit citrus. Kind of sweet and salty too. Everything played off of eachother and it was like listening to some groovy funky music but it was going from the bowl into my facehole, getting chewed and into the great oblivious beyond that is my digestive system. Good good stuff – stuff of poetry and philosophy. Original review

#1: Lucky Me! Instant Pancit Canton (Chow Mein) Extra Hot Chili Flavor

#1: Lucky Me! Instant Pancit Canton (Chow Mein) Extra Hot Chili Flavor

The noodles as always in their pancit canton are just right – good gauge and chew. They are complimented this time with a nice coating of salty and spicy flavors that were really good – and the spiciness was definitely more than adequate. Original review

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Lucky Me! Special Instant Pancit Bihon With Kalamansi

Rice vvermicelli isknown by many names in the world; bihun, beehoon, bihon – it’s all the same thing! One thing though – these noodles are made with corn starch! But pancit – let’s see what wikipedia has to say:

Pancit or pansit is the term for noodles in Filipino cuisine. Noodles were introduced into the Philippines by the Chinese and have since been adopted into local cuisine. The term pancit is derived from the Hokkien pian i sit (Chinese: 便ê食; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: piān-ê-si̍t or Chinese: 便食; pinyin: biàn shí) which means “something conveniently cooked fast.”[1] Different kinds of noodles can be found in Filipino supermarkets which can then be cooked at home. Noodle dishes are also standard fare in local restaurants. Food establishments specializing in noodles are often referred to as panciterias.

Nancy Reyes Lumen of the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism writes that according to food lore handed down from the Chinese, noodles should be eaten on one’s birthday.[1] They are therefore commonly served at birthday celebrations and Chinese restaurants in the Philippines often have “birthday noodles” listed on their menus. However, she warns that since “noodles represent long life and good health; they must not be cut short so as not to corrupt the symbolism.”[1]

Another one here is kalamansi. What is that? Again, wikipedia:

Citrofortunella microcarpa, the calamondin or calamansi, is a fruit tree in the family Rutaceae in native Asia. Other English language common names include calamonding, calamandarin, golden lime, Philippine lime,Panama orange, Chinese orange, and acid orange.[1] Its cultivation has spread throughout Southeast Asia, India, Hawaii, the West Indies, and Central and North America.[2] The plant is characterized by wing-like appendages on the leaf stalks and white or purplish flowers. Its fruit has either a spongy or leathery rind with a juicy pulp that is divided into sections.

The fruit is indigenous and widely cultivated in the Philippines (Tagalog: calamansi or kalamansî [kɐlɐmɐnˈsɪʔ]; Visayan: limonsito or simuyaw [sɪˈmujɐw]), Malaysia (Also known as limau kasturi) and neighboring northern parts of Indonesia. It is available year-round in the Philippines and is usually seen in its unripened green state. When left to ripen it turns a tangerine orange.

I has always thought that kalamansi was just the Filipino word for lime! Now it sounds more like a smaller kind of thing, like a lime and a kumquat combined. Interesting! Let’s check out Lucky Me! Special Bihon – with kalamansi!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Looks to be meat free, but check for yourself. To prepare, add vegetables sachet content and noodle block to a bowl and cover with boiling water. Cover for 4 minutes and drain. Add in contents of remaining sachets and stir well. Enjoy!

The bihon block.

The powder base sachet.

A light powder.

A dual sachet of seasoned oil and sauce.

The two seen here co-mingling.

The vegetables sachet.

An interesting mix – looks to be green onion and regular onion.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added pork, sweet onion, spring onion, shrimp, carrot and bell pepper sauteed with soy sauce. The noodles are thin and light. They don’t have to strong of a chewiness which I liked in this one. The flavor is kind of a light meat kind of thing with a little sweet and savory in there but no spiciness. The garnish hydrated well and added a little something something. 3.75 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 4807770272547.

I couldn’t find the Bihon variety on Amazon, but here’s the Pancit Canton Kalamansi flavor!

A short documentary by the BBC about the Philippines.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Lucky Me! Instant Pancit Canton (Chow Mein) Chili & Citrus

It’s been a while since I had any Lucky Me! Pancit Canton. This is a re-review of the 40th instant I ever reviewed! That puts it around 2002 or 2003 being the last time I tried this one. Not only that, it’s been about 1,000 reviews since I had any Pancit Canton. So what’s Pencit? Wikipedia has this to say:

Pancit or pansit is the term for noodles in Filipino cuisine. Noodles were introduced into the Philippines by the Chinese and have since been adopted into local cuisine. The term pancit is derived from the Hokkien pian i sit (Chinese: 便ê食; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: piān-ê-si̍t or Chinese: 便食; pinyin: biàn shí) which literally means “convenient food.”[1] Different kinds of noodles can be found in Filipino supermarkets which can then be cooked at home. Noodle dishes are also standard fare in local restaurants. Food establishments specializing in noodles are often referred to as panciterias.

Nancy Reyes Lumen of the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism writes that according to food lore handed down from the Chinese, noodles should be eaten on one’s birthday.[1] They are therefore commonly served at birthday celebrations and Chinese restaurants in the Philippines often have “birthday noodles” listed on their menus. However, she warns that since “noodles represent long life and good health; they must not be cut short so as not to corrupt the symbolism.”[1]

Pancit Canton is chow mein instead of just noodles. As for the mention of birthday noodles – yeah – the Chinese thought is that if you eat uncut noodles on your birthday, it symbolizes a long life and is a lucky thing to do. Perhaps the name Lucky Me! has some roots in this idea? Let’s check out Lucky Me! Pancit Canton – Chili and Citrus!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Looks to be meat-free but check for yourself. To prepare, add noodle block to 400ml boiling water and cook for 3 minutes. While cooking, add sachet contents to a plate and combine to create a paste. Drain noodles and add to plate. Stir, combining thoroughly. Enjoy!

The noodle block.

A dry seasoning sachet.

A dry mix with flecks in it.

A dual sachet of seasoned oil and a thin dark sauce.

Dual sachet contents co-mingling together.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added prawn, lime and red chilli paddi. The noodles are just perfect – it’s so reminiscent of Indonesian Mi Goreng. They have a good gauge and nice chewiness. The flavor is like a slightly spicy, lime-infused buttery salty kind of melange that just works so well. The only downside? Yeah – I want to eat more! 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.EAN bar code 4807770270291.

If you really like this variety, you can get 72 packs of it here! I know of many people who like to make two at a time!

A Lucky Me! Pancit Canton TV advertisement.

#1128: Lucky Me! Special Instant Pancit Bihon With Kalamansi

Hey look! Something from The Philippines! I can’t remember the last time I had anything from The Philippines (looked it up – August 18th, 2012 – almost a whole year ago). You might be wondering, what is pancit bihon? Wikipedia says:

Pancit or pansit is the term for noodles in Filipino cuisine. Noodles were introduced into the Philippines by the Chinese and have since been adopted into local cuisine. The term pancit is derived from the Hokkien pian i sit (Chinese: 便ê食; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: piān-ê-si̍t or Chinese: 便食; pinyin: biàn shí) which means “something conveniently cooked fast.”[1] Different kinds of noodles can be found in Filipino supermarkets which can then be cooked at home. Noodle dishes are also standard fare in local restaurants. Food establishments specializing in noodles are often referred to as panciterias.

Nancy Reyes Lumen of the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism writes that according to food lore handed down from the Chinese, noodles should be eaten on one’s birthday.[1] They are therefore commonly served at birthday celebrations and Chinese restaurants in the Philippines often have “birthday noodles” listed on their menus. However, she warns that since “noodles represent long life and good health; they must not be cut short so as not to corrupt the symbolism.”[1]

Holy cow! I’m gonna live forever! With that, let’s check these noodles out.

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Looks to be meat-free but check for yourself.

Thin rice noodles.

Powder base.

Has a sweet and salty scent.

The liquid packets – soy sauce on the left and seasoned oil on the right.

Interesting colors.

The veggie packet.

A curious melange.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added Walla Walla sweet onion, red bell pepper and beef sauteed with a little soy sauce. The noodles are as thin as can be. That coupled with the fact that they’re rice noodles gives them a really crumbly texture.. The flavor is nice though, with a sweet and salty balance which works well. The veggies hydrated nicely as well. 3.25 out of 5.0 stars. UPC bar code 4801110272547.

A Lucky Me! TV commercial.

#895: SuperMi Sedaaap Mi Goreng & Citrojugo Lime Juice Review

Here’s one of the last couple from my friend in Jakarta, Indonesia – thanks again – mailed off your sticker yesterday! Mi Goreng – always a tasty treat! Today, I’m doing things a little differently. Not only am I reviewing these noodles but…

A few weeks ago, I received an email from a representative of Citrojugo. They make lime juice – in fact, they make a lot of lime juice! They wanted to know if I would be interested in purchasing some of their lime juiced for use with my products. I let them know I don’t make anything, I just review, but I would be happy to review their lime juice, not that I’m a lime juice expert or anything. Here’s what they sent – almost a liter of thick, cloudy lime juice concentrate. This stuff is potent! Decided to marinate a chicken breast with it, some chicken broth and Cavendar’s Greek seasoning. We’ll see how it came out further down.

Here’s the back of the noodle package (click to enlarge).

Part of the noodle block.

Here we have the crispy fried onion garnish and powder seasoning.

Crunchy stuff!

Powder seasoning.

Liquid seasonings: chili sauce and sweet soy sauce/oil mixture.

Lots of it.

I put the chicken breast in the over in a 8×8 dish with the Citrojugo lime juice, chicken broth and seasoning, covered and baked for 50 minutes. Looks pretty good to me!

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added yellow onions, green bell pepper, broccoli, hard boiled egg with Krazy Mixed Up Salt, Dua Belibis chili sauce, kizami shoga (pickled ginger) and some baked chicken marinated in Citrojugo lime juice concentrate with a little Cavender’s Greek Seasoning. The noodles are great – not too chewy, not at all soggy. The flavor of the powder and liquid give it a sweet and spicy taste that can only be described as Mi Goreng – wonderful! The crunchy fried onions are an absolute treat. These are great 5.0/5.0 stars noodles. As for the lime juice, I can’t say that I’m any form of authority on lime juice, but its really good with the chicken! I has a crisp and tasty acidity that makes the chicken taste great! Best concentrated lime juice I’ve ever had the fortune to sample. Special thanks to Jazmin at Citrojugo! UPC bar code 089686915709 .

Wow I wish they sold this stuff here! Really wish I had a SuperMi bowl and apron for when I’m making it too!

Happy Eid al-Adha! Here’s a Wikipedia link for those not familiar with this holiday.

#38: Lucky Me! Pancit Canton Citrus Flavor


Lucky Me: Pancit Canton Citrus Flavor
Stars: ***
Notes: This was something new for sure – citrus ramen? Well, it didn’t taste all that
extremely fruity. I ate it without any adulterants [veggies, chicken, eggs etc]
and found it to be quite good – was like the way lemon juice highlights a good
salmon dish. Was definitely lime juice doing all the marketing here.