Tag Archives: KiKi椒麻麵

Meet The Manufacturer: #2478: Kiki Noodles Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle

Meet The Manufacturer: #2478: Kiki Noodles Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi蔥油拌麵

Today we have the second of the Kiki Noodles products – the scallion oil and soy sauce. Definitely a lighter and more mild taste than a Sichuan peppercorn. These noodles come from Tainan in the south of Taiwan. Here’s some background on the city from Wikipedia –

Tainan, officially Tainan City is a special municipality of Taiwan, facing the Taiwan Strait in the west and south. Tainan is the oldest city on the island of Taiwan and also commonly known as the “Capital City” (府城; Fǔchéng; Hú-siâⁿ) for its over 200 years of history as the capital of Taiwan under Koxinga and later Qing dynasty rule. Tainan’s complex history of comebacks, redefinitions and renewals inspired its popular nickname “the Phoenix City”.

Tainan was initially established by the Dutch East India Company as a ruling and trading base called Fort Zeelandia during the period of Dutch rule on Taiwan. After Dutch colonists were defeated by Koxinga in 1661, Tainan remained as the capital of the Tungning Kingdom until 1683 and afterwards the capital of Taiwan Prefecture under Qing Dynasty rule until 1887, when the new provincial capital was moved to Taipei. Tainan has been historically regarded as one of the oldest cities in Taiwan, and its former name, Tayouan, has been claimed to be the origin of the name “Taiwan”. It is also one of Taiwan’s cultural capitals, for its rich folk cultures including the famous local snack food, extensively preserved Taoist rites and other living local traditions covering everything from child birth to funerals. The city houses the first Confucian school–temple, built in 1665,[9] the remains of the Eastern and Southern gates of the old city, and countless other historical monuments. Tainan claims more Buddhist and Taoist temples than any other city in Taiwan.

I can say from experience that Tainan is a really fascinating and amazing place. Indeed, if you visit Taiwan, you really must visit Tainan. Let’s give this second variety by Kiki Noodles a try!

Kiki Noodles Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle – Taiwan

Meet The Manufacturer: #2478: Kiki Noodles Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi蔥油拌麵

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, boil noodles in a pot for 3~5 minutes. Stir to loosen. Drain. Add to bowl and add sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

Meet The Manufacturer: #2478: Kiki Noodles Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi蔥油拌麵

One of the six servings in the large bag.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2478: Kiki Noodles Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi蔥油拌麵

The dry noodles.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2478: Kiki Noodles Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi蔥油拌麵

A liquid sachet.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2478: Kiki Noodles Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi蔥油拌麵

Has a nice scallion scent.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, sliced fishball and spring onion. The noodles are round in gauge and chewy in nature. The flavor is extremely good – definitely soy and scallion here. What I like is that it’s got a nice sweetness along with it. It seems so basic but it’s so tasty! 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. No barcode provided.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2478: Kiki Noodles Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi蔥油拌麵

Kiki Scallion Oil & Soy Sauce Flavor Noodle

A visit to Tainan, where these noodles come from.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2477: Kiki Noodles Sichuan Spices Flavor Noodle

Meet The Manufacturer: #2477: Kiki Noodles Sichuan Spices Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi椒麻拌麵

Kiki has two products – this one and a scallion oil variety. Sichuan spicy – that’s an interesting kind of peppery taste. Here’s a little about the pepper from Wikipedia –

Sichuan pepper, Sichuan peppercorn, or Chinese coriander, is a commonly used spice in Chinese, Tibetan, Nepali, and Indian cuisine. It is derived from at least two species of the global genus Zanthoxylum, including Z. simulans and Z. bungeanum. The botanical name comes from the Greek xanthon xylon (ξανθὸν ξύλον), meaning “blond wood”. It refers to the brightly coloured sapwood possessed by several of the species. The genus Zanthoxylum belongs in the rue or citrus family, and, despite its name, is not closely related to either black pepper or the chili pepper.

The husk or hull (pericarp) around the seeds may be used whole, especially in Sichuan cuisine, and the finely ground powder is one of the ingredients for five-spice powder. It is also used in traditional Chinese medicine. The pericarp is most often used, but the leaves of various species are also used in some regions of China.[1]

Sichuan pepper’s unique aroma and flavour is not hot or pungent like black, white, or chili peppers. Instead, it has slight lemony overtones and creates a tingly numbness in the mouth (caused by its 3% of hydroxy alpha sanshool) that sets the stage for hot spices. According to Harold McGee in On Food and Cooking, they are not simply pungent; “they produce a strange, tingling, buzzing, numbing sensation that is something like the effect of carbonated drinks or of a mild electric current (touching the terminals of a nine-volt battery to the tongue). Sanshools appear to act on several different kinds of nerve endings at once, induce sensitivity to touch and cold in nerves that are ordinarily nonsensitive, and so perhaps cause a kind of general neurological confusion.”

Yeah to sum up, Sichuan pepper is something very different from say, a jalapeno pepper. It’s interesting stuff! Let’s give this one a try.

Kiki Noodles Sichuan Spices Flavor Noodle – Taiwan

Meet The Manufacturer: #2477: Kiki Noodles Sichuan Spices Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi椒麻拌麵

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Looks to be meat free but check for yourself. To prepare, boil noodles in a pot for 3~5 minutes. Stir to loosen. Drain. Add to bowl and add sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

Meet The Manufacturer: #2477: Kiki Noodles Sichuan Spices Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi椒麻拌麵

Six of these bags are in each package.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2477: Kiki Noodles Sichuan Spices Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi椒麻拌麵

The dry noodles.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2477: Kiki Noodles Sichuan Spices Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi椒麻拌麵

A liquid base.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2477: Kiki Noodles Sichuan Spices Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi椒麻拌麵

Has an oiliness and slight sweetness to the scent.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2477: Kiki Noodles Sichuan Spices Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi椒麻拌麵

A sachet of Sichuan pepper.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2477: Kiki Noodles Sichuan Spices Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi椒麻拌麵

This is quite a lot of it – curious to see how spicy it is.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, chicken baked with Kiki seasoning and Salt For Life, sweet onion, red bell pepper and sesame seeds. The Noodles are thin with a great chew to them. The flavor is excellent – there’s a sweetness and a fire! I really like how the pepper is in a sachet – gives one the option for how hot they like their noodles. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. oodles. No barcode provided.

Meet The Manufacturer: #2477: Kiki Sichuan Spices Flavor Noodle - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - KiKi椒麻拌麵

Kiki Sichuan Spices Flavor Noodle

A visit to Kiki Restaurant in Taiwan.