Tag Archives: asam laksa

Meet The Manufacturer: #3092: Way Premium Foods Authentic Penang Asam Laksa – Malaysia

Meet The Manufacturer: #3092: Way Premium Foods Authentic Penang Asam Laksa - Malaysia

Today, we bid a fond farewell to this great series of products from Way Premium Foods of Malaysia with a Malaysian favorite, Asam Laksa. Here’s some info about it from WIkipedia –

Asam laksa is a sour, fish and tamarind-based soup. Penang Asam Laksa listed at number 26th on World’s 50 most delicious foods compiled by CNN Go in 2011.[12] Asam is the Malay word for any ingredients that makes a dish tastes sour (e.g. tamarindgelugur or kokum). Laksa typically uses asam keping, known as kokum in the English speaking world, which is a type of dried slices of sour mangosteens. The modern Malay spelling is asam, though the spelling assam is still frequently used.

The main ingredients for asam laksa include shredded fish, normally kembung (small mackerel of the Rastrelliger genus), and finely sliced vegetables including cucumber, onions, red chillies, pineapple, lettuce, common mint, daun kesum (Vietnamese mint or laksa mint), and pink bunga kantan (torch ginger). Asam laksa is normally served with either thick rice noodles or thin rice noodles (vermicelli). And topped off with petis udang or “hae ko” (蝦膏), a thick sweet prawn/shrimp paste.[1]

Variants of asam laksa include:

Penang laksa (Malay: Laksa Pulau Pinang), also known as asam laksa from the Malay for tamarind, comes from the Malaysian island of Penang. It is made with mackerel (ikan kembung) soup and its main distinguishing feature is the asam or tamarind which gives the soup a sour taste. The fish is poached and then flaked. Other ingredients that give Penang laksa its distinctive flavour include lemongrassgalangal (lengkuas) and chilli. Typical garnishes include mintpineapple slices, thinly sliced onion, hε-ko, a thick sweet prawn paste and use of torch ginger flower. This, and not ‘curry mee’ is the usual ‘laksa’ one gets in Penang. Penang Laksa is listed at number 7 on the World’s 50 best foodscompiled by CNN Go in July 2011

Time to cook – let’s go!

Way Premium Foods Authentic Penang Asam Laksa – Malaysia

Meet The Manufacturer: #3092: Way Premium Foods Authentic Penang Asam Laksa - Malaysia

Detail of the side panels (click to enlarge). Contains fish. To prepare, boil noodles for 3~4 minutes. Drain and set aside. add liquid sachet to 200ml water and bring to a boil. Add noodles. Finally, stir and enjoy!

Meet The Manufacturer: #3092: Way Premium Foods Authentic Penang Asam Laksa - Malaysia

A pillow pack of instant noodles.

Meet The Manufacturer: #3092: Way Premium Foods Authentic Penang Asam Laksa - Malaysia

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge).

Meet The Manufacturer: #3092: Way Premium Foods Authentic Penang Asam Laksa - Malaysia

The noodle block.

Meet The Manufacturer: #3092: Way Premium Foods Authentic Penang Asam Laksa - Malaysia

A large wet sachet.

Meet The Manufacturer: #3092: Way Premium Foods Authentic Penang Asam Laksa - Malaysia

A spicy and sour scented paste.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added pineapple, hard boiled egg, fried tofu with lemongrass, lettuce, fried garlic, and Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts. This was just delightful. The broth has a tangy and sour hit to it with a nice tomato kind of taste. The noodles marry to it so well and it just sings of Penang flavor. Very impressed. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 9555861000861.

Meet The Manufacturer: #3092: Way Premium Foods Authentic Penang Asam Laksa - Malaysia

Enchanting Penang (Enchanting Asia)

Watch me put this together on the 150th episode of Instant Noodle Recipe Time!

#2819: World O’ Noodle Asam Laksa Flavour Instant Noodles

#2819: World O' Noodle Asam Laksa Flavour Instant Noodles

Got this one at the Jason’s Market at the foot of the Taipei 101. Asam laksa – possibly a new taste for you. Here’s something from Wikipedia –

Asam laksa is a sour, fish and tamarind-based soup. Penang Asam Laksa listed at number 26th on World’s 50 most delicious foods compiled by CNN Go in 2011.[13] Asam is the Malay word for any ingredients that makes a dish tastes sour (e.g. tamarindgelugur or kokum). Laksa typically uses asam keping, known as kokum in the English speaking world, which is a type of dried slices of sour mangosteens. The modern Malay spelling is asam, though the spelling assam is still frequently used.

The main ingredients for asam laksa include shredded fish, normally kembung (small mackerel of the Rastrelliger genus), and finely sliced vegetables including cucumber, onions, red chillies, pineapple, lettuce, common mint, daun kesum (Vietnamese mint or laksa mint), and pink bunga kantan (torch ginger). Asam laksa is normally served with either thick rice noodles or thin rice noodles (vermicelli). And topped off with petis udang or “hae ko” (蝦膏), a thick sweet prawn/shrimp paste.[1]

Alright – let’s crack it open and give it a try!

World O’ Noodle Asam Laksa Flavour Instant Noodles – Malaysia

#2819: World O' Noodle Asam Laksa Flavour Instant Noodles

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains fish and crustaceans. To prepare, boil noodles in 400ml water for 2 minutes. Add in sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

#2819: World O' Noodle Asam Laksa Flavour Instant Noodles

The noodle block.

#2819: World O' Noodle Asam Laksa Flavour Instant Noodles

The soup base sachet.

#2819: World O' Noodle Asam Laksa Flavour Instant Noodles

A granular powder.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Dodo fishball, coriander and Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts. The noodles are good – nice gauge and soft chew. The broth has that nice little spicy kick and sour notes. Basic and good. 3.75 out of 5.-0 stars. EAN bar code 4894514002744.

#2819: World O' Noodle Asam Laksa Flavour Instant Noodles

The Little Malaysian Cookbook

A recipe for Asam Laksa.

Meet The Manufacturer: #1838: Vit’s Taste Of Malaysia Penang Asam Laksa Fried Instant Noodle

So these new Taste of Malaysia varieties from Vit’s come in two ways: a fried instant noodle accompanying a paste or a fresh ramen pouch with a paste. It’s a very early morning here – we had to be up at 3am! In fact, my first taste of the day was this laksa at 5:42am! Let’s check out this new one from Vit’s!

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains prawn and anchovy. To prepare, add paste and noodle block to 400ml boiling water and cook for 3-4 minutes (I’ll be cooking 3.5 minutes). Stir and enjoy!

The noodle block.

The paste sachet.

Thick stuff!

Finished (click to enlarge). Added carved squid and Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts. The noodles are Vit’s standard fare – nice gauge, good mouthfell. The broth has a nice and strong flavor of spiciness and fish with a good oiliness to it. 4.5 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 9556354000957.

I LOVE PENANG ASAM LAKSA Tag License Plate Frame Gift Car Accessory

A short video about hawkers in Malaysia, specifically Penang.

Meet The Manufacturer: #1835: Vit’s Taste Of Malaysia Penang Asam Laksa Ramen

Here’s something fancy – asam laksa ramen! Vit’s has a ramen line which uses these pouches of fresh ramen noodles – haven’t seen this kind of thing before with Malaysian flavors. Here’s a little about what asam laksa is from wikipedia:

Asam laksa is a sour, fish and tamarind-based soup. Penang Asam Laksa listed at number 26th on World’s 50 most delicious foods complied by CNN Go in 2011.[6] Asam is the Malay word for any ingredients that makes a dish tastes sour (e.g. tamarind, gelugur or kokum). Laksa typically uses asam keping, known as kokum in the English speaking world, which is a type of dried slices of sour mangosteens. The modern Malay spelling is asam, though the spelling assam is still frequently used.

The main ingredients for asam laksa include shredded fish, normally kembung (small mackerel of the Rastrelliger genus), and finely sliced vegetables including cucumber, onions, red chillies, pineapple, lettuce, common mint,daun kesum (Vietnamese mint or laksa mint) and pink bunga kantan (torch ginger). Asam laksa is normally served with either thick rice noodles or thin rice noodles (vermicelli). And topped off with petis udang or “hae ko” (蝦羔), a thick sweet prawn/shrimp paste.

Penang laksa (Malay: Laksa Pulau Pinang), also known as asam laksa from the Malay for tamarind, comes from the Malaysian island of Penang. It is made with mackerel (ikan kembung) soup and its main distinguishing feature is the asam or tamarind which gives the soup a sour taste. The fish is poached and then flaked. Other ingredients that give Penang laksa its distinctive flavour include lemongrass, galangal (lengkuas) and chilli. Typical garnishes include mint, pineapple slices, thinly sliced onion, hε-ko, a thick sweet prawn paste and use of torch ginger flower. This, and not ‘curry mee’ is the usual ‘laksa’ one gets in Penang. Penang Laksa is listed at number 7 on the World’s 50 best foodscompiled by CNN Go in July 2011

Sound good? Let’s check it out!

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains prawn and fish. To prepare, take noodles out of one of the two pouches and run under water to loosen. Add paste to 250ml boiling water for 30 seconds. Add noodles and cook for 30 seconds. Stir and enjoy!

The the package contains two servings, so two of these fresh ramen pouches.

There are also two of these large paste sachets.

Paste!

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts. The noodles in this one were probably the best fresh pouch/shelf stable ramen I’ve had yet. Chewy and thick. The broth was top notch as well with a sweet and spicy flavor and a good amount of oiliness. The thickness was there – rich with bits of fish floating around. Awesome asam laksa! 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 9556354000810.

I must say that travelling to Malaysia was one of the highlights in my life. Here’s a Lone Planet guide to KL, Melaka and PG!

A day in Penang with curry mee and asam laksa!

#1620: Premiere Gold Penang Asam Laksa Bihun

Another new Malaysian variety! It seems like the Malaysian instant scene has really caught fire these days – and no complaints from me! This is asam laksa – asam means tamarind, so it has a sour taste to it. Couples with seafood flavors, Bihun is also known as rice vermicelli! Let’s have a look at this Premiere Gold Penang Asam Laksa!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Contains fish. To prepare, add noodles to 380ml boiling water and cook 3-5 minutes. Add in contents of sachet and stir. Enjoy!

The block of bihun.

A single sachet, although a large one.

Scent includes fish and spices.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added broccoli, mung bean sprouts and coriander. The noodles came out very nicely – very thin bihun but not the ultra thin. The vermicelli was very well cooked with a good texture. The flavor from the paste was quite nice – a spicy, sour and fish flavor was ever present. I was expecting more broth though. 3.25 out of 5.0 stars.EAN bar code 9555064200978.

Penang Heritage Food: Yesterday’s Recipes for Today’s Cook

A short video showing an asam laksa hawker stall in Penang, Malaysia.

#1545: Nanyang Chef Penang Asam Pedas Hot & Sour Instant Noodle

A while back, I reviewed Nanyang Chef’s Penang White Curry Noodle With Nanyang Chili Paste. Today, it’s a new product from them – Asan Pedas. At first, I thought this would be Asam Laksa, but then I dug a little in Wikipedia and found that Asam Pedas is a stew accompanied by fish. The Asam word refers to tamarind, which lends to the sour nature of Asam Laksa as well as Asam Pedas. Let’s check out this new comer from Nanyang Chef!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Contains shrimp. To prepare, add instant noodle block to 380ml boiling water and cook for 3 minutes. Add in paste and stir gently. Enjoy!

The noodle block.

A very large Asam Pedas paste sachet.

This smells absolutely wonderful!

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added fried mackarel in chilli sauce, cili padi, bean sprouts, coriander and sliced spring onion. The noodles have a good gauge and a decent chew to them. They have a nice gauge as well. The broth has a really great balance of spiciness as well and that great tamarind sour taste. This is really delicious stuff! 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.EAN bar code 9555098800359.

Penang Heritage Food: Yesterday’s Recipes for Today’s Cook (from Amazon) – Penang is one of the food capitals of Malaysia. However, over time, many Penang heritage dishes have been modified so much that what is served today is just a pale image of the original. The tastes of home-cooked dishes have not been faithfully reproduced from one generation to the next. Similarly, street- food and restaurant recipes have not been faithfully passed from a retiring chef to his successor. This book preserves the Penang heritage food from days of yore, covering home- cooked food, street food and restaurant dishes. Meticulously researched, every recipe is prefaced with heritage information and, together, they trace Penang heritage food to its Thai, Hokkien, Hainanese, Indian and Malay roots. Penang Heritage Food won a national award for best culinary history in the World Gourmand World Cookbook Awards.

During our trip in early October, we spent much of our time in Georgetown, Penang. This video shows some of what it looks like there, but it is no substitute for the sights, sounds, and people of Penang in person. I have been bitten by the travel bug and hopefully we’ll be able to return someday. I would say Penang was truly paradise.

Meet The Manufacturer: #1435: Maggi 2 Minute Noodles Assam Laksa Flavour

A while back I reviewed the Malaysian version of this one. This is the one from Singapore – and it says it’s got a ‘new look, better taste’ – sounds awesome! But what is Assam Laksa? Here’s what Wikipedia says:

Asam laksa is a sour, fish-based soup. It is listed at number 7 on World’s 50 most delicious foods complied by CNN Go in 2011.[5]Asam (or asam jawa) is the Malay word for tamarind, which is commonly used to give the stock its sour flavor. It is also common to use asam keping (also known as asam gelugor), dried slices of sour mangosteen, for added sourness. The modern Malay spelling is asam, though the spelling assam is still frequently used.

The main ingredients for asam laksa include shredded fish, normally kembung fish or mackerel, and finely sliced vegetables including cucumber, onions, red chillies, pineapple, lettuce, common mint, “daun kesum” (Vietnamese mint or laksa mint) and pink bunga kantan (ginger buds). Asam laksa is normally served with either thick rice noodles or thin rice noodles (vermicelli). And topped off with “petis udang” or “hae ko” (蝦羔), a thick sweet prawn/shrimp paste.

Let’s see what I can do with this one with the extra garnishes I have around here.

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). Contains fish and milk. To prepare, add noodle block and sachet contents to 400ml boiling water. Cook for 2 minutes, stirring gently. Enjoy!

The noodle block.

The soup base sachet.

A granular powder.

 

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added fish ball, mint, lime, sliced green onion, bell pepper and sweet onion. The noodles are your typical instant with a very nice firmness – good stuff. The broth has a slightly spicy and sour/tart finish which is fascinating. 4.0 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 9556001129970.

Nestle Singapore recently did a special Google Hangout called Cook-Along. Check it out!

Meet The Manufacturer: Product Samples From Maggi Singapore 1

A big long box – let’s see what’s within!

Somebody spent a long time crumpling up paper – it was very well packed!

Here’s what remains when I took out all the paper. Let’s check it out!

Hey this looks good – spicy curry!

Three varieties of their 2 minute noodles – curry, asam laksa and tom yam.

Hey cool – I’ve seen these quite often on Instagram and been really curious about them!

A new bowl!

A trolley cart! Wow! Definitely holds all the noodles, too!

What a neat poster! Signed, too! Thank you very much!

#844: Maggi 2 Minute Noodles Perencah Asam Laksa

Spent some time hanging out with my friend Matt B. the other day and we went to HT Oaktree Market on 100th & Aurora in Seattle and found this new one. But what is Asam Laksa? Here’s what Wikipedia has to say:

Asam laksa is a sour, fish-based soup. It is listed at number 7 on World’s 50 most delicious foods complied by CNN Go in 2011.[5] Asam (or asam jawa) is the Malay word for tamarind, which is commonly used to give the stock its sour flavor. It is also common to use asam keping (also known as asam gelugor), dried slices of sour mangosteen, for added sourness. The modern Malay spelling is asam, though the spelling assam is still frequently used.

The main ingredients for asam laksa include shredded fish, normally kembung fish or mackerel, and finely sliced vegetables including cucumber, onions, red chillies, pineapple, lettuce, common mint, “daun kesum” (Vietnamese mint or laksa mint) and pink bunga kantan (ginger buds). Asam laksa is normally served with either thick rice noodles or thin rice noodles (vermicelli). And topped off with “petis udang” or “hae ko” (蝦羔), a thick sweet prawn/shrimp paste.

Was about to drop some beef or chicken in there but I think that wouldn’t make much sense here. Sounds neat! From Malaysia! Let’s hit it up.

Here’s the back (click image to enlarge). So I’m going to go with 2 cups of boiling water and drop in the noodles and seasoning for 2 minutes.

A very light colored noodle block – almost white.

One seasoning packet.

Here’s the stuff of flavor.

Found these things at HT Oaktree Market too – they were in the Indonesian section and looked interesting. Upon bringing them home, I tried them and found they were horrid. Today I looked at the bag and you have to fry them. IT’S CRAZY!!! You drop some of them into some hot oil and fry them – they expand – really quickly too – and turn into these crunchy shrimp flavored chip-like things. Thought I’d add some.

Finished (click image to enlarge). Added onion, Fresno chili pepper, lettuce, some Komodo Shrimp Chips, a scrambled egg with Krazy Mixed Up Salt and Dua Belibis Chili sauce. The noodles aren’t shabby – nothing to write home about but decent. The broth is great – it is indeed sour, spicy and has a hit of seafood taste. If you squirted a ton of lemon juice in, it’d be a lot like Tom Yum. I really liked it – 4.0 out of 5.0 stars! UPC bar code 9556001128850 – get it here.

A Maggi Laksa commercial

Singapore documentary