MEASURING

So one thing I’ve found is that sometimes it isn’t exactly logical what is printed on the back of noodle packaging so maybe I can help. For example, I’ve had packs say 400cc of water followed by saying that 400cc of water is 1 1/2 cups of water, but another one says its about 2 cups of water. 400cc of water is 1.7 cups.  Closer to 1 1/2 cups I guess. I look at it as being a kind of how flavorful do you want it kind of thing. Then again, you can always use this calculator to convert cubic centimeters [cc's] into cups. I like going this route…

Then there’s the taza. It drove me nuts for a long time actually! A package I had called for 2 tazas of water. I tried to figure how many tazas are in a cup for eons. Well, a taza IS a cup. So there’s that mystery solved.

Its really important to read those directions – I can’t stress thiis more! I mean, Indomie Mi Goreng is going to taste like completely crap if you didn’t drain the water. So watch the instructions.

6 thoughts on “MEASURING

  1. Eric

    Now I know what you mean – on my packet of Unif Bean Vermicelli – “Tong Tsai” flavor, the directions are completely messed up and whoever typed them up should be fired. This isnt a simple mistranslation which I could understand – its mere incompetence! How could such an error make it out of the factory? I mean, didnt anyone read their own label? Sheesh! Heres an image of the directions: http://www.shoptheeast.com/1711-2190-thickbox/unif-instant-bean-vermicelli-chinese-spices-tong-tsai-flavor-194-oz.jpg

    The first method calls for “one cup of water” which they say in parenthesis is 450cc which it isnt.. 450 is like two cups. But then, according to the alternate boiling water directions, it calls for 550cc of water! So now we have 3 different amounts of water suggested on the same package! Do they think that the boiling process will evaporate 100cc of water?

    Silly Unif!

    Reply
  2. Douglas

    Now that I think about it: I looked up the Portuguese word for “cup” and it’s “taça”.
    Portuguese traders visited Japan in the 1500s and were very influential in the development of certain Japanese foods. Tempura for example, and also cake and bread baking. I suspect the word “taza” came into Japanese (and then other Asian languages?) from the Portuguese taça”.

    Reply

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