Category Archives: Mom’s Dry Noodle

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom’s Dry Noodle Vegan Chilli With Sesame Sauce

Mom’s Dry Noodle Vegan Chilli With Sesame Sauce - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

A lot of people these days are giving up meat and switching to the Vegan lifestyle. So, what’s the difference between Vegetarian and Vegan? It seems like there are many different ‘flavors’ of Vegetarianism. For example, I have a friend who claims to be vegetarian, however he eats bacon, eggs and Jack In The Box fast food tacos. Here’s what wikipedia has to say about Veganism:

Veganism is both the practice of abstaining from the use of animal products, particularly in diet, and an associated philosophy that rejects the commodity status of animals.[9] A follower of either the diet or the philosophy is known as a vegan (pronounced vee-gən).

Distinctions are sometimes made between several categories of veganism. Dietary vegans refrain from ingesting animal products. This means avoiding not only meat but also egg and dairy products and other animal-derived foodstuffs.[n 1] Some dietary vegans choose to wear clothing that includes animal products (for example, leather or wool).[15] The term ethical vegan is often applied to those who extend the philosophy beyond diet into other areas of their lives. This philosophy means opposing the use of animal products for any purpose.[n 2] Environmental veganism refers to avoiding animal products on the premise that harvesting or industrial farming of animals is environmentally damaging and unsustainable.[20]

The term vegan was coined in 1944 by Donald Watson when he co-founded the Vegan Society in England. At first this meant “non-dairy vegetarian” and later “the doctrine that man should live without exploiting animals”.[21] Interest in veganism increased in the 2010s; more vegan shops opened, and vegan options became increasingly available in more supermarkets and restaurants in many countries.[22]

Vegan diets tend to be higher in dietary fiber, magnesium, folic acid, vitamin C, vitamin E, iron, and phytochemicals, and lower in dietary energy, saturated fat, cholesterol, long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin D, calcium, zinc, and vitamin B12.[n 3] Well-planned vegan diets can reduce the risk of some types of chronic disease including heart disease.[24] Vegan diets are regarded as appropriate for all stages of the life-cycle by the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council, and Dietitians of Canada.[25] Because uncontaminated plant foods do not provide vitamin B12 (which is produced by microorganisms such as bacteria), researchers agree that vegans should eat B12-fortified foods or take a supplement.[n 4]

I always thought that Veganism just was about food, but apparently it can reach into other aspects of life as well. Let’s take a look at this spicy Vegan spicy chilli and sesame variety from Mom’s Dry Noodle.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Vegan Chilli With Sesame Sauce – Taiwan

Mom’s Dry Noodle Vegan Chilli With Sesame Sauce - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). The manufacturer has told me that this is Vegan friendly. To prepare, first add noodle block to a pot of water and boil for 5 1/2 minutes. Then drain. Add in sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

Mom’s Dry Noodle Vegan Chilli With Sesame Sauce - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

One of four servings in the package.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Vegan Chilli With Sesame Sauce - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

The noodle block.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Vegan Chilli With Sesame Sauce - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

A liquid sachet.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Vegan Chilli With Sesame Sauce - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Looks like soy sauce.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Vegan Chilli With Sesame Sauce - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

A tan colored liquid in a sachet.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Vegan Chilli With Sesame Sauce - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Definitely the sesame saucer.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Vegan Chilli With Sesame Sauce - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Finally, we have an oil sachet.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Vegan Chilli With Sesame Sauce - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

A spicy chilli oil.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, sliced shallot and garlic and spiralized cucumber. The noodles are great – nice chew and good quantity. The flavor is very strong – that nice kind of peanutty sesame sauce and then a really good spicy bite from Sichuan pepper oil. Ties together nicely. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 4717011150018.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Vegan Chilli With Sesame Sauce - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Find Mom’s Dry Noodle Products at Rakuten

A short documentary about Veganism.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom’s Dry Noodle Sour & Spicy Flavor

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodle Sour & Spicy Flavor - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Here’s one I really like. It has what I like to call a ‘back and forth effect flavor.’ It’s like you get one flavor lingering then your palate gets the hint of another flavor, then back to the first. It’s really unique in this way – reminds me of one of my favorite hot sauces – not in the taste, mind you, but this kind of back and forth. Let’s check it out!

Mom’s Dry Noodle Sour & Spicy Flavor – Taiwan

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodle Sour & Spicy Flavor - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Here’s the back of the outer package (click to enlarge). The manufacturer has assured me that this is Vegan friendly.. To prepare, boil a pot of water. Add in noodle block and cook for 5 1/2 minutes. Drain. Finally, add in sachet contents. Stir and enjoy!

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodle Sour & Spicy Flavor - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

The package contains 4 servings like this.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodle Sour & Spicy Flavor - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

A different style of noodle block.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodle Sour & Spicy Flavor - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

The first of 3 liquid sachets.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodle Sour & Spicy Flavor - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Has a kind of soy scent.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodle Sour & Spicy Flavor - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Another liquid sachet.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodle Sour & Spicy Flavor - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Black vinegar I believe.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodle Sour & Spicy Flavor - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

A final liquid sachet.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodle Sour & Spicy Flavor - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Looks like a spicy oil.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spiralized cucumber, baby corn and garlic. I really like these noodles. They are flat and a little broader with a very serious chew to them. The flavor is very unique. It’s a kind of crisp black vinegar hit along with a spicy oil hit to it. It’s like ping pong; you notice the heat, then the vinegar, then the heat. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 4717011150117.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodle Sour & Spicy Flavor - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Find Mom’s Dry Noodle Products at Rakuten

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp among other varieties being featured on a popular Taiwanese TV show.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom’s Dry Noodle Sichuan Spicy Flavor

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodles Sichuan Spicy Flavor - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - Instant NoodlesSo I remember the first time I tried this one a couple years ago. Indeed, it is spicy! Sichuan pepper is a little different kind of spicy in contrast to a jalapeno or wasabi – here’s a little info about the Sichuan pepper from wikipedia:

Sichuan pepper’s unique aroma and flavour is not hot or pungent like black, white, or chili peppers. Instead, it has slight lemony overtones and creates a tingly numbness in the mouth (caused by its 3% of hydroxy alpha sanshool) that sets the stage for hot spices. According to Harold McGee in On Food and Cooking, they are not simply pungent; “they produce a strange, tingling, buzzing, numbing sensation that is something like the effect of drinks with carbonation or of a mild electric current (touching the terminals of a nine-volt battery to the tongue).

Sanshools appear to act on several different kinds of nerve endings at once, induce sensitivity to touch and cold in nerves that are ordinarily nonsensitive, and so perhaps cause a kind of general neurological confusion.”

Recipes often suggest lightly toasting the tiny seed pods, then crushing them before adding them to food. Only the husks are used; the shiny black seeds are discarded or ignored as they have a very gritty, sand-like texture. The spice is generally added at the last moment. Star anise and ginger are often used with it in spicy Sichuan cuisine. It has an alkaline pH and a numbing effect on the lips when eaten in larger doses.

Ma la sauce (Chinese: 麻辣; pinyin: málà; literally “numbing and spicy”), common in Sichuan cooking, is a combination of Sichuan pepper and chili pepper, and it is a key ingredient in má là hot pot, the Sichuan version of the traditional Chinese dish. It is also a common flavouring in Sichuan baked goods such as sweetened cakes and biscuits.[citation needed] Beijingmicrobrewery Great Leap Brewing uses Sichuan peppercorns, offset by honey, as a flavouring adjunct in its Honey Ma Blonde.[12]

Sichuan pepper is also available as an oil (Chinese: 花椒油, marketed as either “Sichuan pepper oil”, “Bunge prickly ash oil”, or “huajiao oil”). In this form, it is best used in stir-fry noodle dishes without hot spices.[citation needed] The recipe may include ginger oil and brown sugar cooked with a base of noodles and vegetables, then rice vinegar and Sichuan pepper oil are added after cooking.[citation needed]

Indeed tingling and numbing going on here. As a matter of fact, yeah, that’s kind of something I would say describes the sensation very well. Definitely easier to understand if you have it firsthand of course. Of course, it’s kind of like explaining chocolate to someone who’s never tasted anything sweet. Ultimately, let’s give this one another look – it was #1 on my Top Ten Taiwan list in 2014!

 Mom’s Dry Noodles Sichuan Spicy Flavor – Taiwan

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodles Sichuan Spicy Flavor - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - Instant Noodles

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains meat. To prepare, add noodle block to a pot of boiling water and cook for 5 minutes. Drain. Add sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodles Sichuan Spicy Flavor - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - Instant Noodles

One of the four servings in the package.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodles Sichuan Spicy Flavor - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - Instant Noodles

The noodle block.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodles Sichuan Spicy Flavor - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - Instant Noodles

The first of three sachets.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodles Sichuan Spicy Flavor - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - Instant Noodles

A kind of soy mixture.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodles Sichuan Spicy Flavor - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - Instant Noodles

A reddish liquid.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodles Sichuan Spicy Flavor - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - Instant Noodles

A paste with a spicy scent.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodles Sichuan Spicy Flavor - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - Instant Noodles

An oil sachet.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodles Sichuan Spicy Flavor - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - Instant Noodles

An oil with a deep yellow hue.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Chinese sausage, carrot, spring onion and fried onion. So I have to say I love these noodles! The scalloped edges, the width, the chew are great and in fact, I could chew on these forever – not that they’re overly chewy and would require such. The spicy Sichuan pepper flavor coats and satisfies. Furthermore, it’s not a one trick pony and in the end, it’s spicy and very tasty as well. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 4717011150001.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodles Sichuan Spicy Flavor - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater - Instant Noodles

Find Mom’s Dry Noodle Products at Rakuten

A visit to the factory in Taichung where the noodles are produced.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Here’s one I’ve liked for a while . In fact, it’s on the Taiwanese op Ten list! I really like shrimp as well as onion! I thought since I’ve had the opportunity to try a nice amount of Taiwanese food now, I’d share this info about their food from wikipedia:

Pork, seafood, chicken, rice, and soy are very common ingredients. Beef is far less common, and some Taiwanese (particularly the elderly generation) still refrain from eating it.[1] This is in part due to the considerations of some Taiwanese Buddhists, a traditional reluctance towards slaughtering precious cattle needed for agriculture, and an emotional attachment and feeling of gratitude and thanks to the animals traditionally used for very hard labour.[1] However, due to influences from the influx of out of province Chinese in the early 1900s, the Taiwanese version of beef noodle soup is now one of the most popular dishes in Taiwan.

Taiwan’s cuisine has also been influenced by its geographic location. Living on a crowded island, the Taiwanese had to look aside from the farmlands for sources of protein. As a result, seafood figures prominently in their cuisine. This seafood encompasses many different things, from large fish such as tuna and grouper, to sardines and even smaller fish such as anchovies. Crustaceans, squid, and cuttlefish are also eaten.
A pork keⁿ, a thick soup with tofu and surimi-coated pork
Because of the island’s sub-tropical location, Taiwan has an abundant supply of various fruit, such as papayas, starfruit, melons, and citrus fruit. A wide variety of tropical fruits, imported and native, are also enjoyed in Taiwan. Other agricultural products in general are rice, corn, tea, pork, poultry, beef, fish, and other fruits and vegetables. Fresh ingredients in Taiwan are readily available from markets.

In many of their dishes, the Taiwanese have shown their creativity in their selection of spices. Taiwanese cuisine relies on an abundant array of seasonings for flavour: soy sauce, rice wine, sesame oil, fermented black beans, pickled radish, pickled mustard greens, peanuts, chili peppers, cilantro (sometimes called Chinese parsley), and a local variety of basil (九層塔; káu-chàn-tha̍h; “nine story pagoda”).

An important part of Taiwanese cuisine are xiaochi,[2] substantial snacks along the lines of Spanish tapas or Levantine meze.

The Taiwanese xiaochi has gained much reputation internationally. Many travelers go to Taiwan just for xiǎochī. The most common place to enjoy xiǎochī in Taiwan is in a night market. Each night market also has its own famous xiǎochī.

Moreover, the Taiwanese xiǎochī has been improving to a higher level. Nowadays, Taiwanese xiǎochī not only served in night markets but some luxury and high-end restaurants. The prices usually jump 100% or even higher in the restaurants. Also, the Taiwanese government supports the Taiwanese xiǎochī and has held national xiǎochī events in Taiwan regularly.

Let’s give this one a try.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor – Taiwan

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). Contains shrimp. To prepare, boil a pot of water. Add in noodle block and cook for 5 1/2 minutes. Drain. Finally, add in sachet contents. Stir and enjoy!

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

The package contains 4 servings like this.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

The noodle block.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

A dry sachet.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Looks like shrimp and chives perhaps?

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

A liquid sachet.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Dark – maybe soy sauce.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

A second liquid sachet.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

The onion oil.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added spiralized carrot, sliced spring onion and a shrimp. Good gauge and chew once again to these fine noodles. The flavor is amazing! I gave it 5 stars last time but I feel like I should give it 6 although that isn’t possible! The taste is a great shrimp and onion fusion – sweet and absolutely delicious. Okay, I’m saying it. yummy. 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.  EAN bar code 4717011150018.

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp Flavor - Taiwan - Taiwan - The Ramen Rater

Find Mom’s Dry Noodle Products at Rakuten

Mom’s Dry Noodle Onion Oil & Shrimp among other varieties being featured on a popular Taiwanese TV show.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom’s Dry Noodle Pepper & Sesame Sauce

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodle Pepper & Sesame Sauce - The Ramen Rater - Taiwan

So today we kick off Meet The Manufacturer with a unique variety – pepper and sesame sauce. First, this is black pepper, not hot chill. Second, sesame sauce is completely different from sesame oil. Sesame sauce has a more peanut butter kind of texture and flavor whereas sesame oil has that strong sesame scent and saltiness. Let’s dig into this one and get things started!

Mom’s Dry Noodle Pepper & Sesame Sauce – Taiwan

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodle Pepper & Sesame Sauce - The Ramen Rater - Taiwan

Here’s the back of the package (click to enlarge). The manufacturer has assured me it is Vegan friendly. To prepare, first add noodle block to a pot of water and boil for 5 1/2 minutes. Then drain. Add in sachet contents. Finally, stir and enjoy!

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodle Pepper & Sesame Sauce - The Ramen Rater - Taiwan

The package contains 4 servings like this.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodle Pepper & Sesame Sauce - The Ramen Rater - Taiwan

The noodle block.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodle Pepper & Sesame Sauce - The Ramen Rater - Taiwan

A dry sachet.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodle Pepper & Sesame Sauce - The Ramen Rater - Taiwan

Pepper! Made me sneeze!

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodle Pepper & Sesame Sauce - The Ramen Rater - Taiwan

The first of three liquid sachets.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodle Pepper & Sesame Sauce - The Ramen Rater - Taiwan

Smells like a soy sauce.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodle Pepper & Sesame Sauce - The Ramen Rater - Taiwan

The second liquid sachet.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodle Pepper & Sesame Sauce - The Ramen Rater - Taiwan

Has a kind of peanut scent to it.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodle Pepper & Sesame Sauce - The Ramen Rater - Taiwan

An oil sachet.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodle Pepper & Sesame Sauce - The Ramen Rater - Taiwan

A deep orange colored oil.

Finished (click to enlarge). Added Salad Cosmo mung bean sprouts, shredded carrot and Chinese yam. The noodles came out very well – good chew and gauge. I really liked how the sesame and pepper played off of eachother; worked very well. 4.25 out of 5.0 stars. EAN bar code 4717011150186.

Meet The Manufacturer: Re-Review: Mom's Dry Noodle Pepper & Sesame Sauce - The Ramen Rater - Taiwan

Find Mom’s Dry Noodle Products at Rakuten

I visited Mom’s Dry Noodle back in November, 2016. We traveled south to Tainan to visit a noodle factory – don’t worry, I won’t quit my day job when it comes to folding them, but flipping – that I can do!