March 10, 2012

#675: Samyang Nagasaki Jjampong

Here’s the second of the two packs sent to me by Chris H. of Westport, CT – thanks again! So this is the other extremely popular variety out of Korea, Samyang’s Nagasaki Jjampong. I read that ‘white broth’ instant noodles are all the rage there – none are for sale in the Asian grocery stores I frequent and the ones Chris sent are from Korea. Anyways, let’s give it a try!

Here’s the back of the package (click image to enlarge). I decided that adding 550mL water and cooking for three minutes would do the trick.

The noodle block in this one’s round.

Powder seasoning packet.

Amazing – it smells and tastes like Jalapeno Cheese Cheetos! It’s pretty tasty!

The veggie packet.

I smell fish and see some seaweed. Curious as to how this will come out.

Finished (click image to enlarge). First, the noodles. Wide and chewy – like an instant udon. The broth is spicy and has a nice heartiness to it. The little veggies are good too – not exactly sure of everything in the packet but it has a meat-like texture; maybe fish? Not sure. All in all, this is excellent. 4.75 out of 5.0 stars! UPC number 8801073110472 – get it here.

Samyang Nagasaki Jjampong commercial.

How to make Korean Jjampong!

Products cooked according to package instructions. Product reviews done prior to adding any additional ingredients.

9 thoughts on “#675: Samyang Nagasaki Jjampong

  1. Dan Isbell

    Just a tip- the directions say to boil everything for 5 minutes. Looking at the ingredients, seems there is some dried squid (cuttlefish), dried clam?, dried green onion, and mushroom in the veggie packet. Probably some other things too; my food-science Korean isn’t great.

  2. Gorgonzola

    The back of the packet doesn’t say to boil for 3 minutes, but rather equates 550ml of water to three of the small paper cups that are so ubiquitous in Korea. Cooking time is five minutes.

  3. Chris

    They say this ramen took it’s inspiration from a ramen served in a Chinese restaurant in Nagasaki, Japan. Invented by a Chinese-Japanese gentleman name Pingsun Chun (陳平順) at his restaurant Shikairo (四海樓) in the late 19th century, legend has it that he developed the dish as a nutritious affordable dish for hungry Chinese students living in Japan.

      1. Hannah

        This is indeed similar to Kko Kko Myun in that the broth is white, but the base of the broth is entirely different. Kko Kko Myun is chicken based, while Nagasaki Jjampong is mixed-seafood based. Personally, I prefer Nagasaki…

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