February 1, 2011

Re-Review: Nongshim Neoguri Udon Type Noodles Spicy Seafood Noodle Soup

So here’s a classic – Nongshim’s Neoguri. I haven’t had this in a few years so I suppose I’d better have some!

Seasoning powder on the left, veggies on the right.

Bright green veggies on the left, deep red powder on the right.

Boiling in the kettle.

Click image to enlarge. With a couple of eggs, yolk broken. So despite the eggs, this stuff packs a wallop of heat. The broth is spicy but has a very rich seafood flavor. The noodles got bigger and I would definitely consider them to be approaching udon size, but not as big as say Myojo’s Udon packs. The noodles are nice and chewy. I like the amount of vegetables too – lots of seaweed makes me happy with this bowl of noodles. I would’ve liked to have seen more seafood in the ingredients though; all I’m seeing is mussel. I do see sea tangle and seaweed which is a welcome sight though. I’m going to give this one 3.5 out of 5.0 stars. It’s pretty good but I feel left wanting something more. Get it here.

Here’s a commercial for Neoguri. As it turns out, neoguri is Korean for raccoon.

So here’s a weird music video. Enjoy the vids – this stuff uses 19 1/2 ounces of water so it’s a lot to eat!

5 thoughts on “Re-Review: Nongshim Neoguri Udon Type Noodles Spicy Seafood Noodle Soup

  1. Lisa

    I LOVE this ramen. It’s my absolute favorite. Pop in 2 eggs while the water is boiling along w/ the veggie pack, pop in the noodles. Cook to the consistancy you like. Pour out however much water you want to get the right intensity that you want. Add seasoning. Love it!

    Reply
  2. Pingback: #648: Nong Shim Noodle Soup Seafood Ramyun | THE RAMEN RATER

  3. kimmy

    I had this today with two eggs and shiitake. You can really taste the cuttlefish in this one. Delicious! I want to add something seafood-y next time…even just some tiny shrimp, or crab or chopped clams from a can.

    Reply
  4. Jenn

    This is one of my favourites as well. I love the chewiness of these noodles (vs regular ramen noodles). I always rehydrate 2-3 dried shiitakes, slice, and put them in the bottom of the bowl along with 4-5 thawed shrimp (peeled) cut into smaller pieces, depending on the size of the shrimp. I drizzle some sesame oil over them while I cook the noodles with the soup and seasoning – I like it extra spicy so I always put in a few dashes of hot sauce. Pour it all into the bowl, top with green onions, and good to go. Om nom.

    Reply
  5. SOUMEN BANERJEE

    Below is my review for this product that I wrote for Amazon today:

    These have been my most favorite packaged noodles by far for more than a decade

    Though I never bought this item from Amazon, these have been my most favorite packaged noodles by far for more than a decade, and today my taste buds feel vindicated after finding out that it’s the number one best seller on Amazon. I have tried a few other noodles out of curiosity, always in the hope of discovering better or other great-tasting pre-packaged noodles, but have never found anything close to it. That said, I have not really tried out a large number of other varieties of noodles and I also came across The Ramen Rater website today and do plan to try out his all time best packages over the next few months .. but I digress.

    While I like its extra-hot spicy taste, I usually add the following ingredients (sparingly, so as not to overwhelm its original taste): shrimp, green hot serrano chili peppers, button mushrooms, frozen peas, a few slices of chopped tomatoes, garlic, ginger, Chinese parsley (a k a coriander leaves or Cilantro) and last but not the least, my own secret ingredient – a few tablespoons of ready-made Tom Yum Paste which I buy from Asian grocery stores. Sometimes I also add lime juice and or lemon / lime zest at the end if I want a slightly sour taste. These ingredients, especially the Tom Yum paste even make far lesser noodles like Maruchan Instant Lunch, Hot and Spicy Shrimp, 2.25-Ounce Packages – which are sold by Walmart for about thirty cents per cup – taste almost (but not quite) as good.

    Reply

Leave a Reply